37 Pink Perennial Flowers with Names and Pictures

Thinking of adding some perennial flowers to your garden but aren't sure which ones to pick? Perhaps some pink perennial flowers are just the right addition to your gardening space! In this article, hobby gardener Jason White takes a look at some popular pink perennial plants, with names and pictures of each!

Astrantia Major

Are you on the hunt for some pink perennial flowers, but aren’t sure which ones are going to be perennial in your zone? If you’ve landed here, you likely want pink flowers that come back year after year and not die, like annuals. But, which pink flowers are classified as perennial flowers? And which ones will work in your garden?

When you’re selecting flowers, you want to think about your whole garden. What other colors are you using in your garden? How much space do you have? How much shade and sunlight do you get in a day?

Part of the gardening decision, however, is not about the plants. You need to pick the flowers you find the most beautiful. So without further ado, here are our favorite pink perennials. Take a look and see which ones belong in your garden this season!

Achimenes

Achimenes Longiflora
These gorgeous blooms thrive in warmer climates.
Scientific name: Achimenes Longiflora
  • Plant Type: Perennial (zones 10-11), Annual
  • Geographic Origin: Central and South America
  • Sun Exposure: Partial shade, full shade
  • Plant Zone: 10-11

The first flower on our list is the achimenes. This delicate little plant is also known as the cupid’s bow. Usually, achimenes range from light to dark purple, so it might surprise you that they’re on this list. However, you can raise light pink achimenes, and trust us, it’s a gorgeous variant!

Achimenes grow in light to partial shade but need a good amount of light throughout the day. It works best as a perennial in hardiness zones 10-11, which are some of the warmest zones. This is because the plant is related to the African violet, so it’s used to warmer climates. However, you can collect the tubers and replant them in colder climates.

Amarcrinum

X Amarcrinum
This beautiful hybrid can bloom with very little sunlight.
Scientific name: X Amarcrinum
  • Plant Type: Perennial (zones 8-10), Annual
  • Geographic Origin: South Africa
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 8-10

Amarcrinum is a genetically engineered perennial based on an amaryllis flower and a crinum. The result is a beautiful pale pink flower that is a hardier version of amaryllis. The amarcrinum will outlast most winters and provide a lovely, lily-like bloom all summer long.

The amaryllis is a flower native to South Africa that is known for its ability to bloom without much sunlight. It is often confused with a lily but is actually only distantly related. Amaryllis can grow for years but is a delicate flower.

Crinum, on the other hand, is a marsh plant and is often grown in aquariums or swamplands. It has thin, bright petals that fan out and is a hardy plant. However, crinum plants only last a few seasons and rarely make it to maturity.

Amarcrinum is the happy medium between the two. Combining the looks of both amaryllis and crinum, amarcrinum takes the strength of the crinum and the longevity of the amaryllis to create a lovely new perennial plant.

Amarcrinum grows in hardiness zones 8-10. Some gardeners can get it to grow as a perennial in zone 7. It can grow pretty much anywhere in the lower United States. Some northern states might freeze too hard for Amarcinum, but if your home is in one of these zones, you should be able to grow Amarcrinum as an annual.

Anemone

Anemone
This bush-like plant is one of the easiest to grow in the garden.
Scientific name: Anemone
  • Plant Type: Perennial (Zones 3-7), Annual
  • Geographic Origin: Subtropical regions of Africa, Asia, Europe, Americas
  • Sun Exposure: Full to Partial
  • Plant Zone: 3-7

One of the perennials with the most varieties, anemones can range from large to small, dark to light pink, and delicate to hardy. These perennials provide bursts of color in pink, and other colors. The most common type of anemone for a regular garden is a Japanese anemone. Japanese anemones can flower into an almost bush-like plant after years of care.

One of the easiest flowers to grow in the garden, anemones can grow in zones 3-7. Anemones tend to thrive in light shade if you live in a warmer climate. However, cooler temperatures need more sunlight to keep the flowers warm enough. If you choose to plant anemone in your garden, research the specific type before planting them.

Anise Hyssop

Anise Hyssop
As these thrive in the wild, it can be difficult to keep these in only one part of your garden.
Scientific name: Agastache Foeniculum
  • Plant Type: Short Lived Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Northern Regions
  • Sun Exposure: Partial shade to full sun
  • Plant Zone: 4-8

Anise is a beautiful and sweet-smelling plant that blooms in the wild more often than in gardens. It has a light lavender color that can lean towards pink in certain settings. This plant is hardy, thriving in hardiness zones 4-8. It does the best in partial to full suns, like the meadows where it originated.

Anise hyssop is a flower that grows tall (up to four feet in proper conditions) and the roots spread underneath the ground. This means that if you’re not careful, your anise will self-seed and spread throughout your entire garden. It’s a beautiful plant but needs to be kept under control!

Antirrhinum (SnapDragon)

Antirrhinum
These beauties are among the first blooms in the spring.
Scientific name: Antirrhinum
  • Plant Type: Short lived perennial, annual
  • Geographic Origin: Mediterranean
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial shade
  • Plant Zone: 7-11

Commonly known as the snapdragon, an antirrhinum is a popular multi-colored perennial that blooms all over North America. They are native to the higher altitudes of the Alps, Rocky Mountains, and other mountain ranges. While they bloom in zones 7-11, snapdragons generally prefer colder climates. They are also grown as annuals and bloom late into the summer.

Pink snapdragons are known as antirrhinum majus and are among the first flowers to bloom in the spring. If you want to start your garden off with some stunning pink stalks, invest in snapdragons and watch them bloom every year.

Aster

Aster
These Europe and Asia natives can thrive anywhere they have enough sun.
Scientific name: Aster
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Europe, Asia, North America
  • Sun Exposure: Full to partial sun
  • Plant Zone: 3-8

There are over 170 different species in the Aster family, all of which are native to Europe and Asia. They have been planted in many different climates and thrive anywhere they have enough sun. Asters can range from purple to white; pink asters are generally a light pale pink.

Asters grow well in full sun, so make sure they’re not planted under trees or bushes! They are remarkably hardy and work well in zones 3-8. However, make sure you are planting the right kinds of aster for your garden. Some asters are tall and work well as a high border, while others look more like small bushes and shouldn’t be behind other plants.

Astrantia

Astrantia
This low maintenance plant will add unique beauty to your garden.
Scientific name: Astrantia Major
  • Plant Type: Perennial (zones 4-9), Annual
  • Geographic Origin: Central and Eastern Europe
  • Sun Exposure: Partial Shade to Full Shade
  • Plant Zone: 4-9

So far, many of the perennials we’ve discussed are common plants in the garden. However, some more unique plants are equally beautiful in a garden. Astrantia is one of these plants. Commonly known as masterworts, astrantia is a less common perennial.

Astrantia has pointy petals and a pin cushion look, often in contrast to softer, more delicate flowers around it. The petals can vary from white to dark pink, but mostly are white with pink edges and a hot pink center.

Astrantia works well with more shade and in the hardiness zones from 4-9. It’s a very low-maintenance plant and once you plant it, it only needs occasional watering and weeding. The unique look of astrantia can add a very special look to your garden.

Baptisia

Baptisia
This sun lover needs regular watering in the beginning growing stages.
Scientific name: Baptisia
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: North America
  • Sun Exposure: Partial Shade to Full Sun
  • Plant Zone: 5-9

Also called false indigo, baptisia is similar to the indigo plant, only pink. Baptisia can add a wilderness look to your garden. With the large, shrub-leaves, the small pink or lavender flowers accentuate the amount of green. It looks like a shrub with small pink flowers.

Baptisia, or wild indigo, is native to meadows and grassland throughout North America. It grows in underbrush, single plants, or large bushes wherever the seeds drop. If you plant baptisia in your garden, prepare for self-seeding within a year or two!

Baptisia grows in the hardiness zones 5-9 and needs full sun. Although they need a steady watering schedule at first, the plants grow a deep and rich root system that can withstand most major droughts. If you miss watering for a few days, your baptisia won’t be worse off for it.

Bergenia

Bergenia Ciliata
Plant near the front of your garden bed where it will get plenty of direct sunlight for best growth.
Scientific name: Bergenia Ciliata
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Asia
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun, partial sun
  • Plant Zone: 5-8

With large leaves and long stems topped with bright pink flowers, Bergenia belongs in any garden. It’s a short plant and should be planted near the front of the bed so it doesn’t get overshadowed by any larger plants. However, the combination of leaves and flowers makes bergenia a welcome addition to any flowerbed.

Bergenia grows in zones 4-10 and should be planted in either early fall or spring. The plants need plenty of water and direct sunlight. If you live in a hot climate, you should plant them with some light shade so they won’t wither in the hottest days of summer.

Bleeding Hearts

Lamprocapnos spectabilis
These unique blossoms thrive in damp, rich soil.
Scientific name: Lamprocapnos spectabilis
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Northern Asia
  • Sun Exposure: Partial to full shade
  • Plant Zone: 2-9

Lamprocapnos spectabilis, also known as bleeding heart flowers, are tragically beautiful little blooms. They bloom upside down and truly look like their namesake. Usually found in forests where they thrive in partial shade and damp, rich soil.

To plant bleeding hearts, bury the bulbs in moist soil in early spring while the plants are still dormant. If you have potted plants, you can plant them at any time during the growing season. Bleeding hearts are hardy in zones 3-9. It can survive the winter and will last for several years if you care for it well. They also make fantastic plants for shade gardens.

Buddleia (Summer Lilac)

Buddleia
Butterflies love this sweet smelling bush.
Scientific name: Buddleia
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin:
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun
  • Plant Zone: 5-9

Buddleia, also known as summer lilac or the butterfly bush, is popular because of its delicate pink and purple flowers, sweet smell, and ability to attract butterflies to your garden. If one of your gardening goals is to create a haven for various butterflies, buddleia is a must-have for your garden.

The butterfly bush is native to Africa, South America, North America, and Europe. It has spread all over the world and continues to be popular for its size, smell, and butterfly magnetism. Buddleia flowers range from white to dark purple, depending on the season and type of bush.

Buddleia grows in zones 5-9 and survives the winter well. It’s a lovely bush and can grow very large in any garden, so plant it where it will have room to grow. Sometimes lilac bushes can grow to become effective visual barriers to your garden. You can have a completely natural garden wall!

Campion

Silene
These hot pink flowers of the Red Campion will add a vibrant splash of color to your garden.
  • Plant Type: Short Lived perennial or biennial
  • Geographic Origin: Southeastern Europe
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun, Partial sun
  • Plant Zone: 4-10
Scientific name: Silene

Like many plants, Campion has a more common name. For many years, it was called the catchfly plant because flies are attracted to it and get stuck in the nectar. Campion is a member of the Silene family and has a beautiful rose-like flower. Rose campion is a common variant in gardens.

Hardy in zones 4-10, Campion is a more short-lived perennial than most. It usually lasts two or three years. The hot pink flowers bloom in late spring or early summer and add a dash of color to the garden.

Chrysanthemum

Chrysanthemum Morifolium
Pink is just one of the many colors in which you can find these classic blooms.
Scientific name: Chrysanthemum
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: China
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun, partial shade
  • Plant Zone: 5-9

One of the loveliest and most popular perennials is the chrysanthemum. This small, round flower is admired throughout America. Native to East Asia, they spread throughout Europe and America throughout the last few centuries. Chrysanthemums, or as they are often called, mums, can come in a huge variety of colors.

Chrysanthemum flowers can grow in almost any garden in America. They are fall blooms, which make them hot commodities during the autumn months. Mums bloom in zones 5-9 and can survive the winter with proper care. Although you can plant mums, it’s more usual to keep them in pots during the fall and bring them inside during the winter.

Coral Bells

Heuchera
The unique leaves are the true star of this plant.
Scientific name: Heuchera
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: North America
  • Sun Exposure: Partial shade to full shade
  • Plant Zone: 3-9

Known for their hardiness and willingness to grow in any soil condition, coral bells have a huge variety of appearances. From black to green to silver to purple leaves, ruffled or smooth, the leaves are the real star of the plant. However, the blooms are also lovely, with deep pink flowers stacked on long stalks.

Coral bells grow well in any kind of soil, but only in zone 3-9. This is because they won’t survive winters that are colder than that or summers hotter. However, they will survive drought and excessive rainfall without dying. These are some of the hardiest perennials you could have in your garden. They are also great in cold hardy shade gardens.

Creeping Phlox

Phlox Stolonifera
These beautiful blooms act like moss and fill in any empty space.
Scientific name: Phlox Stolonifera
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Eastern United States
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial shade
  • Plant Zone: 5-9

Creeping Phlox doesn’t have the prettiest name in the floral world, but it more than makes up for it in appearance. If you want to create a magical carpeted appearance in your garden, you can plant creeping phlox underneath your spreading trees. The phlox works like moss and fills in wherever there is space.

The pink blossoms of phlox create a beautiful carpet wherever you plant them. They are also a very hardy plant and will survive in almost any environment, but are best in zones 3-9. Creeping phlox doesn’t have very deep roots, so they are one of the few plants that can thrive in clay or sand just as well as rich soil.

Dahlia

Dahlia
These stunning blooms can be found in multiple shades ranging from pale pink to vibrant fuchsia.
Scientific name: Dahlia
  • Plant Type: Perennial (Zones 8-11), Annual
  • Geographic Origin: Mexico
  • Sun Exposure: Full morning sun, partial shade
  • Plant Zone: 8-11

One of the most beautiful and versatile plants in the world, the dahlia is known for its tender opening petals of multiple colors. Pink dahlias can range from pale blush to hot pink and even vary within a plant. They work well in full sunlight as long as it’s not too hot and needs regular watering (but not too much).

Dahlias are perennials in zones 7-11 but can grow as annuals in zones 3-7. Even though they are not winter hardy, it is possible to bring them back by potting them during the winter or keeping them in a greenhouse. These delicate beauties are worth the work it takes to keep them alive.

Dianthus

Dianthus
Keep in direct sunlight or partial shade for multiple rounds of blooms.
Scientific name: Dianthus
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Europe
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial shade
  • Plant Zone: 4-8

The dianthus doesn’t bloom alone–each plant has dozens of buds that burst into vibrant pinks and reds in spring and early summer. With some variants, you’ll be able to see more intermittent blooms before the end of summer. If they are kept in direct sunlight or partial shade, you can get multiple rounds of these exciting little flowers.

Dianthus blooms in zones 4-8, and not much outside of that. If it gets too hot, dianthus plants will get stressed and stop producing flowers. Any hotter than that and they will wither away. Cold winters are okay, as the root system goes deep to survive the freeze. They are low growing perennials and are great for garden edges and borders.

Forget-Me-Not

Myosotis
This sweet pink self-seeder will flourish and multiply in your garden.
Scientific name: Myosotis
  • Plant Type: Short lived perennial, biennial
  • Geographic Origin: Europe and North America
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial shade
  • Plant Zone: 3-8

Traditionally light blue, forget-me-nots can also be purple and pale pink. If you are lucky enough to find a pale pink variation of a forget-me-not, it’s nearly impossible to resist planting it in your garden and watching it flourish in acidic, well-drained soil. You can put forget-me-nots in any garden–they will fly.

This perennial blooms in the wild during April and May and in gardens from June to August. It thrives in zones 3-8 in the United States. They will self-seed and end up everywhere, despite any efforts to keep them in one spot. If your gardening style is a little wild, forget-me-nots might be just the flower for you.

Foxglove

Digitalis
Although beautiful, this is poisonous to ingest, so be sure to keep away from pets and children.
Scientific name: Digitalis
  • Plant Type: Short lived perennial or biennial
  • Geographic Origin: Europe
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to full shade depending on heat
  • Plant Zone: 3-8

The foxglove is one of the most classic pink perennials in the Northern United States. With the classic drooping flowers on long green stalks, these taller perennial flowers are great. They bloom in early summer (with some late stragglers at the end of the summer if you cut the stalks the first bloom).

Foxgloves, while beautiful, are poisonous to ingest. If you have pets or small children, you might want to stay away from this lovely but dangerous plant. These flowers live in zones 3-8 and thrive in partial or complete shade, depending on the heat of the summer sun.

Hardy Hibiscus

Hibiscus Moschuetos
Give this plant plenty of sunlight and room to grow.
Scientific name: Hibiscus Moscheutos
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Southern North America
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun
  • Plant Zone: 5-8

The hibiscus is a lovely tropical flower. It’s pretty and exotic but doesn’t grow in all-seasons climates. However, the hardy hibiscus has been engineered to thrive in zones 5-8. Even people with winters can enjoy the beauty of the hibiscus flower with this variation. The pink version is lovely, blooming large and wonderful over your other plants.

The hardy hibiscus thrives in mild climates that don’t get too hot or too cold. While they can survive winter or summer extremes, they do best during the mild months when the temperatures are fair. You should plant these bushes where they can grow large and be in full sunlight during the day.

Helleborus

Helleborus
This short bush loves shade and moist soil.
Scientific name: Helleborus
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Europe and Asia
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial shade
  • Plant Zone: 6-9

Another unique addition to any garden, these flowers don’t fit your average description of lovely. They are short and squat bushes with leathery, pointy leaves and large flowers. The flowers almost blend in with the leaves: they are pink, but a pale, dusty pink that mirrors the dusty brown-green of the leaves.

Helleborus only thrive in zones 6-9 and can grow in any kind of shade. However, they do best in partial shade with moist soil. Some species are hardy from zone 3, but you’ll have to ask your local nursery or greenhouse if the variety you’ve chosen will survive in colder climates.

Hollyhocks

Alcea
Although not the easiest to grow, these lovely blooms are worth the added effort.
Scientific name: Alcea
  • Plant Type: Short lived perennial or biennial
  • Geographic Origin: Europe
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 3-8

Hollyhocks are famous for their use in most cottage gardens, where they sit by the corners of walls and provide delightful splashes of color. Hollyhocks bloom in tall multi-colored spikes in the middle of summer. While they are difficult to grow, they have some of the most beautiful results in the gardening world.

Hollyhocks are often sold in double plants, which come with two different colors of blooms. You can choose which blooms work best in your garden or grow them from bulbs (although this is more difficult).

To grow hollyhocks, you need to live within zones 3-8 and have well-drained soil. Almost any pH level will do, but the flowers thrive in well-watered areas that are slightly acidic. They need lots of sunlight, but can also do well in partial shade.

Hydrangea

Hydrangea
The pH of your soil will determine the color of these classic summer blooms.
Scientific name: Hydrangea
  • Plant Type: Perennial shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Asia and America
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to full shade
  • Plant Zone: 3-7

Hydrangeas are unique flowers, in that the pH of the soil can affect the color of the flower. The plant thrives in any acidity, but certain plants will be pink or purple depending on the pH. If you pick up a hydrangea plant, check the label to see how the acidity will affect the color of your plants.

Hydrangea bushes can grow to be extremely tall and wide and thrive in zones 3-8. The flowers are small and grouped in balls of flowers. They do best in full sun but can handle shade as well. These flowers are a classic summer sight and bloom from early spring throughout the summer.

Hyssop

Hyssopus Officinalis
This sweet smelling perennial is a great addition to your garden for both looks and medicinal purposes.
Scientific name: Hyssopus Officinalis
  • Plant Type: Perennial (Zones 4-8), Annual
  • Geographic Origin: Europe
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial shade
  • Plant Zone: 4-8

Hyssop is an evergreen perennial with more than just pretty looks. It also works as an herb, medicinally used as a cough suppressant and throat relaxant, and sometimes utilized as a spice similar to peppermint. Hyssop also has lovely pale pink to purple flowers that bloom in late summer.

Hyssop grows as a perennial in zones 4-8, and can be grown as an annual in other zones. If you are looking for a perennial that blooms later in the season and smells very sweet, hyssop is a great option. It will self-seed and spread throughout your garden, but won’t choke out any smaller plants. It cohabitates well in a garden.

Knock-Out Roses

Pink Knock Out Rose
Knock out roses are hardy through many colder growing zones.
Scientific name: Rosa ‘Knock Out’
  • Plant Type: Perennial Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: North America
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial shade
  • Plant Zone: 5-11 depending on variety

Technically, roses are perennials. All roses can be perennial flowers as long as they get the proper sun and care needs that they require. This can also be rose variety and cultivar specific. Some varieties can take more sun than others, and some others can withstand higher temperatures. Knock-out roses are a perennial rose that come in a wide variety of colors, including pink.

These flowers are fairly low maintenance when it comes to their care. They are also disease resistant, and require deep waterings that are less frequent compared to other roses. Knock out roses require around 5 to 8 hours per day of sunlight to properly flourish. They are hardy in zones 5-11 making them a great option even for colder environments.

Impatiens

Impatiens
From blush to magenta, enjoy these bright blooms all summer long.
Scientific name: Impatiens
  • Plant Type: Perennial (Zones 10-11), Annual
  • Geographic Origin: North America
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial shade (variety dependent)
  • Plant Zone: 10-11

If you are a gardener and surprised to see impatiens, a well-known annual on this list, it’s because they actually can come back if they are left alone over the winter! Impatiens are bright, happy little flowers that come back naturally in zones 10-11. Impatiens can be grown in pots and greenhouses or as annual plants throughout zones 2-11.

For those growing perennial impatiens, make sure to give them enough shade to thrive. These plants can come in all different colors, including shades of pink from light blush to deep magenta. Plant a rainbow in your garden and watch it bloom all summer long.

Lily of the Valley

Convallaria Majalis
This early bloomer can thrive in both shade and full sun.
Scientific name: Convallaria Majalis
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: North America
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial shade
  • Plant Zone: 2-9

The lily of the valley is another flower that is known for growing in zones 2-9. This is most of America, with the exceptions of the most northern parts and hottest southern states. Lily of the valley is a more delicate version of the lily, with smaller flowers bursting around a tender green stalk.

You should grow lilies of the valley plants in partial shade or full shade. The pink variation of lily of the valley, however, does just as well in full sun. It’s a rare variant that blooms earlier in the year than regular lilies of the valley and can grow up to eight inches tall.

Lupine

Lupinis
Give these wildflowers a lot of sunlight and well-draining soil for best growth.
Scientific name: Lupinis
  • Plant Type: Perennial (Zones 4-8), Annual
  • Geographic Origin: Mediterranean
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun
  • Plant Zone: 4-8

The lupine is another flower that looks stacked on top of itself–lots of small flowers on a long, thin stalk. Living in hardiness zones 4-8, the lupine flowers can bloom under almost any condition.

Lupines are native to meadows and need lots of sunlight and well-drained soil to thrive. They can be pink, blue, white, or purple, but are more commonly blue and purple. These natural wildflowers work well in gardens that are a little on the wild side themselves–prepare to see a lot of lupines throughout your garden!

Lychnis Coronaria (Gardeners World)

Lychnis Coronaria
This variation is hardier and outlives the regular campion.
Scientific name: Lychnis Coronaria
  • Plant Type: Short Lived Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: North America
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial shade
  • Plant Zone: 3-8

The lychnis coronaria, or gardener’s world, is a variation on the campion. We discussed it earlier–a lovely little plant dotted with bright pink flowers and green-gray stalks. However, the lychnis coronaria is hardier and lasts longer than regular campion.

Lychnis coronaria are among the shorter-lived perennials, usually lasting only 3-4 years. However, if you regularly deadhead your flowers (remove old flowers so new ones can bloom) and cut them down in the winter, you should be able to make them last as long as possible.

Known as an evergreen, the leaves and stalks of this plant will gray out but not die during the winter. Requiring full or partial sun and a home in zones 3-8, this small but lovely plant will fit right in your garden.

Obedient Plant

Physostegia Virginiana
Low maintenance and easy to grow, this plant lives its name.
Scientific name: Physostegia Virginiana
  • Plant Type: Herbaceous Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: North America
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial shade
  • Plant Zone: 3-9

If you are just beginning to garden and want a plant that’s easy to grow, you don’t have to look much farther than this aptly named flower. It’s called the obedient plant because it will do what you ask–just water and feed it and it will grow wherever and whenever!

With square stems and dozens of little bell-shaped flowers per stalk, obedient plants grow in zones 3-9. They can survive tough weather and any level of shade, but grow the lightest pink blossoms if they’re kept in full sunlight.

Oriental Lilies

Lilium Orientalis
Enjoy bright pink petals and a sweet fragrance from these stunning blooms.
Scientific name: Lilium Orientalis
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Europe
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial shade
  • Plant Zone: 4-9

Many of the plants on this list have been light or pale pink. Not so the oriental lily–it jumps out at the gardener with its bright pink petals, sometimes rimmed in white. These plants are sometimes known as Stargazer lilies for the way they look up at the sky.

Oriental lilies grow well in zones 4-9 (but you should mulch them well during the winter in the colder zones). They prefer full sun but can survive in partial shade, especially during the hottest days of summer.

Peonies

Paeonia
These summer beauties will add great biodiversity to your garden.
Scientific name: Paeonia
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: North America
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial shade
  • Plant Zone: 3-8

Peonies are some of the most summery flowers of them all. They droop open and leave petals behind carelessly, reminding us of the carefree days of summer. Peonies are havens for insects of all kinds and bring great biodiversity to a garden, in addition to being lovely.

Generally growing in zones 3-8, peonies do the best in the middle of the United States. Their plants have long, thin stalks that don’t grow that many leaves and become weighed down with the burden of huge flowers. Put peonies in full sun and you can’t go wrong!

Prunella

Prunella Grandiflora
This adaptable plant can grow anywhere and is drought tolerant.
Scientific name: Prunella Grandiflora
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Europe
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial shade
  • Plant Zone: 4-8

Prunella is a wildflower that naturally grows in sunny meadows throughout the country. However, it’s purple and blue. So gardeners and scientists did a little bioengineering and bred the plant to produce prunella Grandiflora–a lovely, deep shade of pink.

To grow prunella Grandiflora, you have to live in zones 3-8 and not overwater your plants. It doesn’t need a lot of water to thrive and too much will drown the roots. It’s adaptable and grows anywhere, which is why some gardeners insist that it’s a weed. Be careful–this lovely lady could overtake your garden! 

Rose of Sharon

Hibiscus Syriacus
Enjoy these bright colorful blooms in the late summer.
Scientific name: Hibiscus Syriacus
  • Plant Type: Perennial shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Asia
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial shade
  • Plant Zone: 5-9

The Rose of Sharon is a lovely flower that is a close cousin to the hibiscus. However, it’s a different plant and has more petals and fewer stamens than the hibiscus. It also grows in more zones, being available in zones 5-9 in America.

The Rose of Sharon can range from white to magenta, with every shade of pink in between. To care for this flowering bush, water it deeply but infrequently, keep it in the sun, and make sure to give it lots of room to grow. It will bloom in late summer when most other flowers are done.

Speedwell

Veronica
This drought tolerant shrub can thrive in almost any conditions within zones 3-8.
Scientific name: Veronica
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Northern Hemisphere
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial shade
  • Plant Zone: 3-9

Veronica is not just a name for a girl–it’s also a lovely little ornamental flower. This tough shrub survives in full sunlight and can grow up to three feet tall. It works well as a backdrop for a garden or growing through some darker shorter plants.

Veronica should be grown in zones 3-8 but can survive pretty much any conditions in these zones. They are drought tolerant and won’t die if you leave them unwatered for a while. The flowers are tiny and cover the entire top of the conical stalk.

Tulips

Tulipa
These sweet, dainty blooms are a springtime staple.
Scientific name: Tulipa
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Europe
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to partial shade
  • Plant Zone: 3-8

Native to Holland and one of the most classic flowers available for gardens and bouquets, the tulip is a welcome addition to any garden. They can come in any color and bloom in profusion. Gardeners like to scatter tulip bulbs around and watch the magic in springtime.

Tulips are spring flowers, so do better in colder climates. Zones 3-8 can successfully house tulips as perennials. Partial shade is perfect for tulips, which need plenty of sunshine but protection from the fiercest of heat.

Yarrow

Achillea Millefolium
This hardy bush enjoys dry soil and full sunlight.
Scientific name: Achillea Millefolium
  • Plant Type: Perennial (Zones 3-7), Annual
  • Geographic Origin:
  • Sun Exposure:Full sun to partial shade
  • Plant Zone: 3-7

Last but certainly not least, yarrow can add a touch of color to even the driest areas of your garden. It doesn’t need a lot of water and can be purchased in all sorts of colors (although we know which color you want at this point). It’s a small flowering bush that can spread and cover a lot of ground–a whole carpeting of color!

Yarrow can grow anywhere from zone 3 to 7 as perennials, but gardeners have reported successfully growing the flower in hotter and colder climates as well. Yarrow is a perennial that loves sunlight, and it can be grown annually in colder climates. It’s a small but mighty little bush that loves dry soil and full sunlight.

Final Thoughts

From a hardy hibiscus to a hydrangea, these flowers are pretty, perennial, and most of all, pink. Although this list doesn’t cover all of the pink perennials available, it has most of the basic types and the conditions they need to thrive. With these flowers, you’ll never lack fresh pink blooms again!

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