61 Perennial Shrubs For Your Home and Garden

Thinking of planting some perennial shrubs but aren't sure which ones will best fit your home or garden space? There are many different options for perennial shrubs, so picking the right one can be a bit confusing. In the following article, we examine over 60 of our favorites, to help you find the perfect match for your garden this season.

Perennial Shrub in Garden

Choosing the right perennial shrub for your garden or home landscape can be a daunting choice! Most perennials will return each year, if they are properly cared for. This means whatever perennial shrub you’ve chosen to plant may become a focal point of your garden or home landscape for the next several seasons.

There are many different kinds of shrubs that flower in different colors. You have the mainstay hydrangea blue, the beautiful pinks of the azalea, or the bright colors of a hibiscus plant. There are truly hundreds of choices you could make, depending on your climate.

So where do you begin? By looking through a massive list of perennial shrubs, of course! We’ve assembled a comprehensive list of our favorite perennial shrubs, with names and pictures of each. So, pull up a chair to start making notes of your favorites to plant in your garden this season, depending on your location. Let’s jump in!

Abutilon

Abutilon theophrasti
Abutilon is an attractive, flowering herbaceous annual or perennial plant, shrub or small tree.
Scientific Name: Abutilon theophrasti
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Tropics and Warm Temperate Zones
  • Plant Size: 48”
  • Sun Exposure: Sun to Part Sun
  • Plant Zone: 7 to 10

Abutilon is a relatively bushy perennial with distinctive hanging flowers available in many colors. It’s desirable to hummingbirds, whose beaks can reach up through the hanging flowers. Colors tend to range between yellow and orange, but some varieties can also have red or pink flowers. The flowers are edible, both raw and cooked.

As a tropical plant, Abutilon does well in warmer environments, though it tends to go dormant in winter regardless of where you plant it. It’s relatively easy to grow, though you’ll want to use soil with both organic material and sand so it resembles coastal environments. Scale insects often attack these shrubs, so keep an eye out for them.

Acanthus

Acanthus montanus
Acanthus is a perennial, heat-loving, herbaceous plant that exists in the Mediterranean, Asia, and Africa.
Scientific Name: Acanthus montanus
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Mediterranean
  • Plant Size: 18”
  • Sun Exposure: Part Sun to Shade
  • Plant Zone: 6-8

Although usually herbaceous, some varieties of Acanthus include small shrubs suitable for planting in gardens. It’s particularly famous for its role in the design of Corinthian architecture, which extensively references its leaves. Acanthus has distinctive spiny leaves, with tall spikes of multiple flowers that are usually white to purple.

This shrub is quite tall, so it works particularly well if you place it close to shorter plants or use it as a frame for both ends of a garden area. This shrub is relatively resistant to animals like deer, and it’s easy to dig up and move if you want to. It may also attract butterflies and other creatures that feed on nectar, which Acanthus has many.

Actaea

Actaea pachypoda
Actaea has white flowers that are collected in fluffy spike-shaped inflorescences. Flowering in May-June.
Scientific Name: Actaea pachypoda
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Eastern parts of North America
  • Plant Size: 30” tall
  • Sun Exposure: Part Sun to Shade
  • Plant Zone: 5 to 9

Actaea is an especially distinctive plant in many gardens, and more so if you plant the Actaea pachypoda version, which develops bright white fruits that resemble eyeballs. The flowers are relatively dense on their stem and prefer somewhat colder areas. Notably, the fruits can persist until frost, so it’s decorative throughout much of the year.

Actaea is relatively rare at gardening companies due to several complex attributes, but it tends to stand out regardless of what you plant it by. Take care, however, as all parts of this plant are toxic. It’s not a good choice if you have pets or children that may come into contact with it, but it’s safe if you enjoy it from a distance.

Aronia

Aronia melanocarpa
Aronia is a fruit shrub or tree belonging to the species Aronia of the Rosaceae family.
Scientific Name: Aronia melanocarpa
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Eastern part of North America
  • Plant Size: 2’
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Mostly Sunny
  • Plant Zone: 3-9

Aronia is a relatively small and dense perennial, able to thrive in many different zones. Sometimes known as chokeberry, Aronia requires minimal maintenance as long as you put it somewhere with lots of sun and soil that drains well. Spring often results in hundreds of tiny flowers, which turn into black fruit in the summer.

Aronia’s fruits are generally edible, though they tend to be bitter until fully ripened. They can also sweeten up if frozen. However, birds love the berries, so don’t expect them to stay on the plant for long if animals have access to it. Aronia is suitable for hedges, easy to prune into shapes, and even tolerant of salt near seaside areas, making it a tough and durable plant for any garden.

Azalea

Rhododendron azalea
Azalea is a well-branched shrub, the flowers are collected in racemose inflorescences, rarely solitary.
Scientific Name: Rhododendron azalea
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Eastern Asia
  • Plant Size: 3’
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 6-9

Azalea is one of the most popular flowering shrubs in the world, with flowers lasting for several weeks. There are thousands of options to choose from, with a wide variety of colors, although shades of pink to red are more common in most areas. Some types require regular pruning, but most don’t need much fertilizer as long as they’re in quality acidic soil.

While most bloom sometime from mid to late spring, some azalea varieties will rebloom in early Fall for an extra burst of color in your garden. They largely stop growing once they reach their full height but can also tolerate regular trimming over the years. As a favorite throughout the centuries, it’s hard to go wrong with this shrub. These popular shrubs can also grow in shady conditions, provided they have at least partial sunlight.

Berberis

Berberis thunbergii
Berberis bushes do not need frequent watering.
Scientific Name: Berberis thunbergii
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Eastern Asia
  • Plant Size: 8’
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Sun
  • Plant Zone: 5-9

The Berberis grows well in most areas, offering pale yellow flowers around spring that turn to long rows of small, bright red fruit by the time Fall rolls around. The leaves are usually a standard green, but some cultivars will have red or purple leaves instead.

Buddleia

Buddleia davidii
Buddleia can bring many benefits to the garden, such as attracting pollinating insects, getting a pleasant aroma and a very beautiful color.
Scientific Name: Buddleia davidii
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Asia and Africa
  • Plant Size: 30”
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun
  • Plant Zone: 5-9

Buddleia (or, sometimes, Buddleja) is a dense butterfly bush that blooms from early summer to sometime in mid-fall. Its tiny flowers bloom densely in cone-shaped segments, with colors ranging from white and down the red spectrum to purple and blue. This shrub is often seen flowering in purple, compared to other colors. Buddleia do not require much pruning or deadheading, although they shrink back to the ground in colder zones.

One notable advantage of this option is that it’s pretty drought-tolerant once established, so you won’t need to water it as often. It also attracts hummingbirds and other pollinators while resisting deer. Buddleia is suitable for hedges in warmer zones but may die back too far in colder regions.

Buxus

Buxus sempervirens
Buxus is a densely leafy shrub or tree with shiny dark green ovate-oblong leaves, and the flowers are greenish, with yellow anthers, fragrant, collected in racemes.
Scientific Name: Buxus sempervirens
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Western Europe
  • Plant Size: 10’
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Mostly Sun
  • Plant Zone: 6-8

Buxus grows in a narrower temperature range than many other shrubs, but in warmer climates, it does well as an ornamental plant. It can handle close shearing, while the entire tree is quite fragrant. Some people like the smell and others don’t, so it may be best to find one of these and smell it in person before you go shopping for one.

Callicarpa

Callicarpa dichotoma
Callicarpa’s small purple pearls, tightly bound at each knot, persist until December, even when the leaves have fallen.
Scientific Name: Callicarpa dichotoma
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Southeast Asia
  • Plant Size: 5’
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun
  • Plant Zone: 5-8

Callicarpa is a relatively tall shrub, which makes it a better hedge than many of the other options on this list. Species from temperate zones are deciduous, but tropical variants are evergreen and can remain attractive throughout the year. Flowers grow in clusters, eventually turning into berries that birds and animals will eat when other food supplies are gone.

Most varieties bloom sometime from the middle of Summer to early Fall, with flowers in the white to purple range. Callicarpa tolerates heat exceptionally well, and it’s quite showy while in bloom. Pruning is optional, but this plant is hardy enough that you can get it into your desired shape without much trouble.

Calycanthus

Calycanthus floridus
Calycanthus flowers amaze the imagination with their graceful appearance, all parts of the plant are aromatic.
Scientific Name: Calycanthus floridus
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: North America and Asia
  • Plant Size: 5’
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Mostly Shady
  • Plant Zone: 5-8

Calycanthus is a flexible and reliable shrub, growing well from fully sunny areas to mainly shady areas. Flowers are large and fragrant, with colors falling into white or dark red. There aren’t many varieties of calycanthus around, so you won’t have quite as many options as you might with some other plants.

The flowers typically bloom sometime in early to mid-summer, and they last quite a while if you want to cut them and bring them inside. One thing to note is that this shrub’s fragrance attracts the beetles that help pollinate it, so it usually does better on the outside of gardens rather than being mixed in with other plants.

Camellia

Camellia sasanqua
Camellia is an evergreen small shrub with beautiful flowers, blooming from autumn to late winter.
Scientific Name: Camellia sasanqua
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: East Asia
  • Plant Size: 8’
  • Sun Exposure: Part Shade
  • Plant Zone: 7-9

The Camellia is a fascinating shrub, standing out as the origin of the tea plant. The flowers are relatively large, with colors varying from white to red. Notably, all tea varieties have white flowers. Their seeds are also suitable for making various oils. Camellia is a practical plant if you want to make homemade tea products, but it also works well as an ornamental option.

One thing to keep in mind is that Camellia shrubs generally prefer warmer areas, so there are large segments of many countries where it’s not practical to grow them.

Caryopteris

Caryopteris incana
Caryopteris is a dense branching shrub up to 1.5 m high.
Scientific Name: Caryopteris incana
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Eastern Asia
  • Plant Size: 2’
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun
  • Plant Zone: 5-9

Caryopteris are relatively short but dense shrubs with clusters of white or blue flowers. It’s drought-tolerant and requires almost no maintenance, with some varieties displaying a dense mounding structure around its central body. The flowers are fragrant and suitable for cutting.

However, while maintenance isn’t necessary, pruning dead growth in early spring will help promote more flowers later in the year. The flowers themselves last from summer until frost, which is longer than many other choices here. Caryopteris provides nectar, so expect hummingbirds and bees if you plant it in a good spot.

Cephalanthus

Cephalanthus occidentalis
Cephalanthus has a good ability to adapt to places with different lighting conditions.
Scientific Name: Cephalanthus occidentalis
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Eastern North America
  • Plant Size: 4’
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Mostly Sunny
  • Plant Zone: 4-10

Cephalanthus is a hardy plant, capable of surviving in a wider set of zones than many other perennial flowering shrubs. The occidentalis family, in particular, thrives well in the climate of its geographic origin. Although capable of growing to impressive heights, it’s mainly notable for the dense globular flowers, whose white stands out against the dark green leaves.

Cephalanthus’ flowers turn to fruit around red summer and can last into winter, providing a bright contrast in a time when most shrubs have settled down for the season. Cephalanthus also works well in wet and boggy zones, so consider this if you have an exceptionally moist area that isn’t suitable for other shrubs.

Chaenomeles

Chaenomeles superba
To protect Chaenomeles shrub from winter damage, late in the fall it is sprinkled with fallen leaves or covered with spruce branches.
Scientific Name: Chaenomeles superba
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Southeast Asia
  • Plant Size: 5’
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun
  • Plant Zone: 5-9

Chaenomeles is a part of the broader rose family, with relatively small flowers ranging from white to red that grow in clusters. Unlike some other plants in this family, Chaenomeles are often thornless, making them easier to cut and shape. They do best in full sun for cooler climates, but a bit of afternoon shade helps them in warmer areas.

Chaenomeles bloom best from mid to late spring, with some varieties, also blooming again in the fall. They can handle almost any soil type, making them easy to pair with other shrubs as part of a broader garden. Consider mixing a little sand into their soil, though, as they enjoy slightly drier soil once established.

Chephalotaxus

Cephalotaxus harringtonii
Chephalotaxus, commonly known as Japanese plum-yew, is an evergreen Shrub growing to 5 m.
Scientific Name: Cephalotaxus harringtonii
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Japan
  • Plant Size: 10’
  • Sun Exposure: Shade or Mostly Shade
  • Plant Zone: 6-9

Cephalotaxus, the Japanese plum yew, is a slow-growing shrub with dark needle-like leaves contrasting nicely with most other shrubs. Unusually, it prefers shady areas, so you can plant it in areas that aren’t suitable for most other shrubs. Flowers are pale and can densely cover the plant when new, though they’ll eventually fade to brown.

Chionanthus

Chionanthus virginicus
In the southern regions, Chionanthus blooms in the second half of May, and in the middle zone – in mid-June.
Scientific Name: Chionanthus virginicus
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Southeast United States
  • Plant Size: 15’
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Mostly Sun
  • Plant Zone: 3-9

Chioanthus is a hardy shrub with clusters of white flowers with long, almost needle-like designs. Most of these shrubs only have one gender for flowers, so you may need to plant several of them if you want a lot of fruit. The flowers are fragrant and can appear throughout spring.

Clethra

Clethra alnifolia
Formative pruning can only be carried out in autumn when the Clethra bush has faded.
Scientific Name: Clethra alnifolia
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: North America
  • Plant Size: 3’
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 4-9

Clethra are mainly upright shrubs, compact and mounded close to the ground. Flowers bloom on spikes between four and six inches long, with dense clusters that are white on most variants. Clethra blooms well in partially shady areas, so it can give color where many other shrubs won’t.

Clethra grows well on slopes and banks, and it’s tolerant to both sea salt and road salt. It can also handle wet areas, while the fragrant flowers attract hummingbirds and butterflies. Flowers tend to be more common on younger stems, so occasionally removing older wood can ensure more flower coverage later in the year.

Cornus

Cornus kousa
Cornus is a slow-growing shrub or tree that grows up to 6 meters tall.
Scientific Name: Cornus kousa
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Eurasia and North America
  • Plant Size: 4’
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Mostly Shady
  • Plant Zone: 3-8

Cornus is a hardy shrub that thrives well in colder zones. Flowers tend to appear by the end of Spring or early in Summer and are almost universally small and white. Cornus tolerates cold much better than many flowering shrubs, and most notably, it provides winter interest thanks to the vividly bright stems.

Cornus has several pruning options. Hard pruning once every two years will encourage new, redder stems for winter appearance. Removing some older stems instead can promote the growth of new ones and, therefore, more flowers and berries. However, avoid pruning for three years so it can establish itself well. Moderately moist soil works best for this shrub.

Corylus

Corylus avellana
Corylus is photophilous, so the entire crown of the bushes should be available to light.
Scientific Name: Corylus avellana
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Europe
  • Plant Size: 10’
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Mostly Sun
  • Plant Zone: 4-8

Best known as the source of hazelnuts, Corylus has distinctive, softly hairy leaves. The female flowers are somewhat unusual, mostly concealed in buds that only show a small amount of their tips. The resulting nuts are usually edible and an essential food source for many animals, making this a good shrub for helping attract animals to a garden.

Cotinus

Cotinus obovatus
In nature, Cotinus can be found in temperate regions of Eurasia and in eastern North America.
Scientific Name: Cotinus obovatus
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Southeast North America
  • Plant Size: 8’
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Mostly Sunny
  • Plant Zone: 5-8

Cotinus is sometimes known as Smokebush, thanks to its unusually frothy-looking flowers. It also grows quite large, with some becoming more of a proper tree than a shrub. Flower colors typically range from white to red. For gardens, Cotinus does best in drier and less-fertile soils, which will limit the growth and keep it more comfortably compact.

Fertile soils can lead to wilting diseases with this plant, so it’s a rare option that does best in areas where you’d usually avoid planting shrubs. Cotinus doesn’t require much maintenance, and since blooms only appear on older wood, you don’t need to trim it for much more than light shaping. More sunlight is better, leading to better colors and flowers.

Daphne

Daphne pontica
Daphne is an evergreen shrub that prefers fresh fertile soils and open spaces in the garden.
Scientific Name: Daphne pontica
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Europe and Asia
  • Plant Size: 3’
  • Sun Exposure: Shade or Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 6-9

Daphne is a rare shrub whose scented flowers blend in with the leaves around them rather than vividly standing out, as you’ll see on most other perennial flowering shrubs. They are relatively short, with most varieties growing slowly and not exceeding four or five feet and long leaves towards the end of stems.

Daphne are quite distinctive because they tend to flower in either late winter or early spring, whereas most shrubs don’t start blooming until mid-spring. However, while they’re easy to grow, note that all parts of Daphne are toxic, and you should keep them away from children and pets. The smell may also irritate guests, so be careful with this one.

Deutzia

Deutzia gracilis
Deutzia thrives best in well-drained, fertile, moist soil.
Scientific Name: Deutzia gracilis
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Central and Eastern Asia, Central America, Europe
  • Plant Size: 2’
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Mostly Sunny
  • Plant Zone: 5-8

Deutzia is a relatively compact shrub, with flowers ranging from white to red. These shrubs tend to be mounding, but they also work well if you put them on containers or let them droop over shorter walls. Their flowers can bloom profusely, covering an impressively large section of ground.

Buds grow on the previous year’s growth, so avoid pruning back too far. That aside, Deutzia works well in most small spaces, and it’s also suitable for planting in groups for ground cover. This includes along slopes, which might be otherwise difficult to cover in color. Deutzia often looks best in an arch, so you may want to trim it occasionally to encourage that.

Diervilla

Diervilla lonicera
Diervilla is from North America, it grows along river banks and rocky slopes.
Scientific Name: Diervilla lonicera
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: North America
  • Plant Size: 3’
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Full Shade
  • Plant Zone: 4-7

Diervilla stands out for several reasons among other shrubs, including its preference for colder weather on average. It’s also a rare flowering shrub that tolerates full shade, making it easy to plant in areas where most other shrubs won’t grow. They tolerate drought well, with excellent soil adaptation.

Flowers on Diervillas are white and yellow, appearing in early or mid-summer. The leaves are relatively large, with the foliage turning reddish in autumn for an extra burst of color. On top of that, Diervilla’s flowers are extremely rich in nectar, making them ideal for attracting both bees and hummingbirds.

Distylium

Distylium myricoides
Distylium Myricoides is a shrub that grows best in a narrow hardiness zone with warmer weather.
Scientific Name: Distylium myricoides
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: China
  • Plant Size: 4’
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Mostly Sun
  • Plant Zone: 7-9

Dystlium prefers a narrow range of warm weather, with some variants growing much lower than other members of the Witch Hazel family. These can produce small, pleasant red flowers in late Winter and bright new leaves that stand out against the older, darker ones.

Image Credit: peganum via Creative Commons (Image Use Allowed With Attribution)

Edgeworthia

Edgeworthia chrysantha
Edgeworthia exudes the sweetest creamy aroma, palpable from a distance, buds look like it has frost on the tips of their branches.
Scientific Name: Edgeworthia chrysantha
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: East Asia
  • Plant Size: 10’
  • Sun Exposure: Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 7-10

Also known as the paperbush, Edgeworthia is a relatively thin shrub with large leaves that fall in an almost flower-like pattern. The flower clusters can be an attractive mix where a bright yellow interior has a slight white outline, providing a distinctive and unusual appearance in gardens. Edgeworthia strongly prefers warmer climates and won’t grow where it’s too chilly.

Elaeagnus

Elaeagnus ebbingei
Elaeagnus is a rustic and hardy shrub, that requires little maintenance and pruning is optional. It tolerates cold and hot climates, places rich in salinity, and places with poor water.
Scientific Name: Elaeagnus ebbingei
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: North America, Europa, Southeast Asia
  • Plant Size: 12’
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun
  • Plant Zone: 6-9

Elaeagnus is a little-known shrub with silver-to-brown scales that give it an unusual grayish appearance from a distance. The flowers don’t have traditional petals and are hard to spot, but they’re quite fragrant and give the whole plant a pleasant scent if you put them as a hedge. The fruits, when ripe, taste much like dark cherries.

Euonymus

Euonymus fortunei
Euonymus grows in full sun in well-drained soils.
Scientific Name: Euonymus fortunei
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: East Asia
  • Plant Size: 24”
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 5-8

Euonymus is a vine-like shrub that does well in drier soils. It spreads relatively well, making it a good groundcover option where you want to fill a lot of space. Some varieties will spread too well, so be careful around open and natural areas to ensure it doesn’t turn invasive. Flowers tend to be small but come in many colors.

Euonymus leaves tend to be dark-green, but some varieties may display paler leaves or even brighter white edges, making them an excellent framing choice. Euonymus is a generally low-maintenance shrub, though you’ll need to do a little more work if you want to train them to climb a stick or wall.

Exochorda

Exochorda racemosa
Exochorda is a photophilous plant, that grows moderately fast and blooms in June with snow-white flowers collected in a brush.
Scientific Name: Exochorda racemosa
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Central Asia
  • Plant Size: 10’
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 4-8

Exochorda, more commonly known as pearlbush, is a relatively little-known shrub related to the Rose family. Its name comes from the tiny, round flower buds that eventually open up to reveal five-petaled white flowers. The leaves are usually medium green, fading into a softer yellow by the time Fall comes around.

Exochorda has more Winter interest than many other shrubs because its old bark tends to fall off, giving it a smoother look. Its fruit is also somewhat unusual, with five fused sections that eventually open up to release flattish seeds.

Forsythia

Forsythia suspensa
Forsythia blooms in early spring with rich yellow flowers.
Scientific Name: Forsythia suspensa
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: East Asia
  • Plant Size: 8’
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 5-8

The Forsythia is one of the most aggressively blooming shrubs, often growing in a way that covers the entire exterior of the plant with clusters of golden flowers. They do well on slopes where they can help prevent erosion, while their widespread leaves in Summer and Fall provide a good amount of privacy.

Most people prefer a somewhat wild look for Forsythia and allow them to grow out, but they’ll need more pruning than other shrubs if you want to keep them within a specific size or shape.

Fothergilla

Fothergilla gardenia
Fothergilla flowering appears on bare branches, before foliage development.
Scientific Name: Fothergilla gardenia
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Southeastern United States
  • Plant Size: 3’
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Mostly Sunny
  • Plant Zone: 5-8

Fothergilla are relatively mid-sized shrubs that have pleasantly puffy flowers. It’s unusually fragrant, with a spicy, honey-like scent. Leaves can change in color throughout the year, with the deep green turning through hues of red and yellow in fall. These shrubs require minimal care, looking best if they’re unpruned.

Fothergilla is also extremely slow-growing, rarely exceeding six feet, usually no more than half of that. Its slow growth rate means you may want to transplant an existing shrub rather than growing it from a cutting yourself.

Hamamelis

Hamamelis virginiana
Hamamelis has ovoid, notched-toothed leaves sitting on short petioles, which acquire very bright colors in autumn.
Scientific Name: Hamamelis virginiana
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: North America
  • Plant Size: 15’
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 3-9

Hamamelis, or Witch Hazel, is a hardy shrub that can survive both hot and cold areas across the country. The common name comes from wiche, meaning bendable, referring to its unusually pliant branches. Hamamelis does well under other, larger trees, and it also works well as a hedge or border shrub.

One thing to note about these shrubs is that they can fling seeds almost thirty feet away. Make sure to collect the fruit before autumn to ensure you won’t have extra specimens growing in your garden.

Heptacodium

Heptacodium miconioides
Heptacodium is a beautiful and unpretentious shrub that tolerates pruning well and does not require special care.
Scientific Name: Heptacodium miconioides
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: China
  • Plant Size: 10’
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 5-9

Heptacodium are among the largest perennial flowering shrubs, often closer to trees. Their conical shape makes it hard to plant them densely enough to make a hedge, but it is possible to grow some other things around their bases. It’s comparatively fast-growing, reaching its full height in about five years and living for at least several decades.

Heptacodium’s flowers tend to poof out near the end of branches, starting fragrant and white to attract bees and butterflies. Once the white petals fall, they leave behind reddish sections that provide more color throughout the year. Heptacodium’s bark can peel back, offering a smoother appearance in the winter months.

Hibiscus

Hibiscus syriacus
Hibiscus care includes regular watering of the plant, especially during hot weather.
Scientific Name: Hibiscus syriacus
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Temperate to Tropical, worldwide
  • Plant Size: 12’
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Mostly Sunny
  • Plant Zone: 5-9

Hibiscus is another favorite shrub, with flowers including various whites, reds, and blues. Its flowers are often good for making tea, and they’re some of the most widely-consumed petals in the world. Hibiscus bloom comparatively late for perennial shrubs, offering most of their color starting in the middle of Summer to early Fall.

These shrubs grow well in most environments but prefer soil that isn’t too wet or too dry. They can handle clay and sandy areas, although they might grow a little slower, while their flowers’ long bloom time makes them ideal for people who want to keep gardens colorful.

Hydrangea

Hydrangea Macrophylla
Hydrangea can change the color of the flowers depending on the acidity of the soil.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea macrophylla
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Asia and the Americas
  • Plant Size: Varies
  • Sun Exposure: Mostly Sunny to Mostly Shady
  • Plant Zone: 5-9

Hydrangea is another favorite shrub, especially in the eastern parts of Asia, where it shows the most diversity. Household hydrangeas tend to grow between 3 and 9 feet depending on species, but a few varieties can reach 100 feet by growing together with a tree. A hydrangea’s color depends on soil pH, going from blue at lower levels to red at higher points. Hydrangeas are one of the few shrubs that have blue blooms, as few shrubs are truly “blue.”

The hydrangea’s flowers are plentiful when they bloom in the summer, providing extensive coverage over the leaves. The flowers can last into winter and dry easily for decorating. Hydrangea prefer moist but well-drained soil, so regular watering can help encourage the best growth. A little bit of shade will also help, so avoid planting in wholly sunny areas.

Hypericum

Hypericum kalmianum
Hypericum is often used as filler in gardens and as an ornamental plant.
Scientific Name: Hypericum kalmianum
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: North America and Asia
  • Plant Size: 3’
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 4-8

Hypericum is more commonly known as St. John’s Wort. While some variants are noxious and invasive, others are easy to tame and don’t spread anywhere near as much. These shrubs have an unusually distinctive flower, with bright petals that peel back from a poofy center. Hypericum does well in containers, along foundations, and as part of mixed borders.

Hypericum grows best in moist and well-drained soil with sandy areas, but it can tolerate poorer areas and handles drought well once it’s grown. Some varieties (including H. perforatum) are also viable for traditional and natural medicine, although this is best done with the advice and support of a qualified doctor.

Ilex

Ilex aquifolium
Ilex is an evergreen slow-growing shrub or densely branched tree up to 10-25 m high.
Scientific Name: Ilex aquifolium
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Temperate and subtropical, worldwide
  • Plant Size: 8’
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Mostly Sunny
  • Plant Zone: 3-9

Ilex, better known by its common name of Holly, is an impressively durable shrub capable of growing in almost any climate. It’s particularly famous for clusters of bright red berries that can last into winter. The flowers, which are small and white, are rather less-famous. Note that Ilex is toxic, and you should keep both children and pets away from it.

Ilex is an essential food source for many species in mid and late winter when several cycles of freezing the fruits soften them up and make them more palatable to animals. Keeping a few of these in the area is an excellent way to support wildlife on top of having a classic and highly distinctive appearance during winter.

Illicium

Illicium parviflorum
Illicium is an evergreen shrub or tree up to 7 meters high, sometimes with several trunks. The wood, foliage and flowers are fragrant, with a licorice scent.
Scientific Name: Illicium parviflorum
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Southeast United States
  • Plant Size: 15’
  • Sun Exposure: Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 6-9

Often known as Yellow Anisetree, Illicium is a relatively rare shrub that’s fragrant throughout much of the year. The flowers are relatively small but offer attractive yellow petals that eventually give way to a star-shaped fruit. Although not overly showy, it grows well. However, unlike regular star anise, illicium’s fruit is toxic and unsuitable for consumption.

Itea

Itea ilicifolia
Itea is an evergreen or deciduous shrub with unusually colored foliage and exotic flowers.
Scientific Name: Itea ilicifolia
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Asia
  • Plant Size: 3’
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Full Shade
  • Plant Zone: 5-9

Itea prefers warmer areas, but it’s one of the few perennial flowering shrubs that grows well from full sun to total shade. It doesn’t spread too widely, but it does grow densely, making it a good option for filling space. Flowers tend to be small and white, growing on spines that stick out from the end of each stem.

Itea works particularly well on slopes and banks, where its dense design and pointy flower sections help disguise the lay of the land below it. The flowers themselves are fragrant and good for butterflies. Itea does not require much pruning, but you can cut away new wood to limit its size.

Juniperus

Juniperus chinensis
Juniperus is a shrub with a cone-shaped crown and dense vertically growing branches.
Scientific Name: Juniperus chinensis
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Worldwide
  • Plant Size: 4’
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun
  • Plant Zone: 4-9

Junipers are a relatively broad family. Shrub versions may only grow a few feet, but some tree variants can get significantly larger. They have evergreen foliage, with minimal flowering and a densely-growing low-maintenance design that makes them ideal for hedges. Junipers tolerate cold weather, offering shelter to animals as well.

Aside from its association with winter, juniperus stands out with its seed cones. Unlike the cones of most other shrubs that have them, juniper’s cones are extremely berry-like in appearance, with uncommonly fleshy outsides. Some juniper berries make spices. However, some are toxic, so make sure to check your variety when buying.

Kerria

Kerria japonica
Kerria is an ornamental shrub with slender drooping branches, graceful leaves and bright yellow flowers.
Scientific Name: Kerria japonica
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: East Asia
  • Plant Size: 10 ft.
  • Sun Exposure: Part Shade
  • Plant Zone: 4-9

Kerria is an unusual shrub in that it’s the only species in its genus. The natural form of the flower has five broad, flattish petals that spread out in a pattern, but the Pleniflora cultivar has a much bushier and layered flower. Kerria requires moderate pruning to maintain its health, but it can grow quite tall and provides unusually showy flowers in Spring.

Lagerstroemia

Lagerstroemia indica
Lagerstroemia is a leafy shrub or small tree that blooms with colorful flowers – in white, pink, purple and red.
Scientific Name: Lagerstroemia indica
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Indian subcontinent and Oceania
  • Plant Size: 2’
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun
  • Plant Zone: 6-9

Lagerstroemia is a flowering shrub that does best in warmer climates, with bright flowers that tend to grow together in clusters starting in late summer. This pink flowered shrub tends to grow taller in warmer areas with no winter freezing, especially if you provide it with moist and well-drained soil.

Lagerstroemia also has a surprisingly high number of species. Some variants will only grow to about one foot high, but a few can grow over a hundred feet. They do well near foundations because they have thinner roots than many other shrubs, but keep them away from concrete and swimming pools because their seedpods can stain things.

Ligustrum

Ligustrum japonicum
Ligustrum has small white flowers, the flowering season is July and August when temperatures are at their highest.
Scientific Name: Ligustrum japonicum
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: East Asia, naturalized in the southern United States
  • Plant Size: 30”
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 7-10

Ligustrum is a warm-weather fan with smooth bark and clusters of small white flowers. Wild versions can grow over 15 feet tall, but garden cultivars are often shorter. It doesn’t require pruning, so it works particularly well in large pots where you can elevate it away from other plants in the garden. Make sure to give it soil that drains well, though.

Linnaea

Linnaea chinensis
Linnaea is a beautiful evergreen shrub, that has dark green foliage and tubular white flowers with light pink bracts.
Scientific Name: Linnaea chinensis
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: East Asia
  • Plant Size: 6’
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Mostly Sunny
  • Plant Zone: 5-9

Known as Abelia until relatively recently and still called that in many places, Linnaea is a sweet-smelling shrub with clusters of trumpet-shaped flowers. Linnaea trends towards graceful arches, making it attractive in many gardens, with leaves starting red in spring and turning green later. That’s opposite to what many other plants do and provides a nice contrast.

Linnaea flowers best when it has as much sun as possible. A firm trimming every few years will help it maintain its appearance, especially because flowers tend to appear on new growth. Blooms can occur from mid-Summer to mid-Fall, and Linnaea does well in soil conditions ranging from acidic to clay to sandy.

Loropetalum

Loropetalum chinense
Loropetalum is a beautiful shrub that blooms in winter.
Scientific Name: Loropetalum chinense
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Eastern Asia
  • Plant Size: 18”
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Mostly Sun
  • Plant Zone: 7-10

The Loropetalum is a warm-weather, evergreen shrub. One form has white-to-pale-yellow flowers and green leaves, while the other has bright pink leaves with more olive and burgundy leaves. They prefer acidic soil, and despite liking warm weather, they can tolerate the occasional bout of extreme cold.

Magnolia

Magnolia figo
Magnolia has large, solitary, axillary flowers, that have 6 creamy yellow or pale purple waxy petals with an elegant dark red border around the edge.
Scientific Name: Magnolia figo
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin:
  • Plant Size: 10’
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun or Part Shade
  • Plant Zone: 7-11

The Magnolia Figo, more widely called the Banana Shrub, is a rather large flowering bush whose fragrant flowers smell similar to bananas. It strongly prefers warmer and tropical zones, capable of surviving in all but the most scorching regions. While it grows in the sun or some shade, putting it in the shade will produce dark-green leaves that tend to be more attractive.

Mahonia

Mahonia aquifolium
Mahonia flowers in autumn and winter acquire reddish hues and then numerous bluish-black edible fruits appear, which also gives the plant a delightful appearance.
Scientific Name: Mahonia aquifolium
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Eastern Asia, North, and Central America
  • Plant Size: 7’
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Light Shade
  • Plant Zone: 5-9

Mahonia is an evergreen shrub with noticeably spiny leaves that remind many people of the winter favorite, Holly. Mahonia is a four-season plant, offering yellow or red flowers in Spring, acidic berries in Summer, bright leaf colors in Fall, and green foliage in Winter. Songbirds also like this plant as it provides a good, natural spot for them.

It’s possible to plant Mahonia alone, but it will get significantly more fruit if you plant several close together so they can cross-pollinate. The leaves also deter humans and deer, making this a sturdier hedge than many other shrubs. Mahonia dislikes winter wind, however, so consider that when deciding where to plant it.

Osmanthus

Osmanthus fragrans
Osmanthus blooms in small inflorescences, white, cream, yellowish and even orange color.
Scientific Name: Osmanthus fragrans
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Asia
  • Plant Size: 10’
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Mostly Sun
  • Plant Zone: 7-10

The Osmanthus, or Tea Olive, is one of the perennial flowering bushes most commonly grown for impressively fragrant flowers. Flower colors vary. Some cultivars of this shrub have an unusual orange shade. The flowers are also good for creating osmanthus tea and many traditional Chinese desserts, making this a highly practical shrub to add to your garden.

Physocarpus

Physocarpus opulifolius
Physocarpus is able to maintain its spectacular appearance throughout the entire growing season.
Scientific Name: Physocarpus opulifolius
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: North America
  • Plant Size: 6’
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Mostly Sunny
  • Plant Zone: 3-7

Physocarpus is a hardy shrub that blooms well in colder areas. Unlike many other shrubs, it doesn’t like warmer zones quite as much. While leaves can be green, some varieties have different colors, including red, purple, and yellow. Flowers tend to grow in small clusters, with white petals surrounding red seed heads.

Physocarpus requires minimal pruning and remains colorful throughout the year, making it an excellent choice for backdrops, borders, or stand-alone placement. They prefer areas with good air circulation, so it’s often better to place them away from houses and other large structures.

Pieris

Pieris japonica
Despite the fact that Pieris is poisonous, it is often grown in gardens.
Scientific Name: Pieris japonica
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Eastern Asia and North America
  • Plant Size: 10”
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 5-9

Pieris is a relatively large shrub, often associated with the more petite lily of the valley despite their botanical differences. Flowers grow in rows of bell-shaped buds, usually some mix of white and pink, and give off a pleasing scent. The flowers start appearing in early spring, providing faster color than many other shrubs.

Pieris can grow in full sun, but it prefers a slightly shady place with some protection from colder winds. It may also require more care than some other shrubs, with regular mulching helping ensure it can keep growing to its full potential. Having well-drained soil is especially important as Pieris does not tolerate too much moisture.

Potentilla

Potentilla fruticosa
Potentilla is a branched beautiful flowering shrub up to 1-2 m high with light green leaves and numerous glossy yellow flowers.
Scientific Name: Potentilla fruticosa
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Northern Hemisphere
  • Plant Size: 3’
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun
  • Plant Zone: 2-7

As part of the rose family, Potentilla grow well in all but the warmest climates. They’re a rare shrub that can grow down to Zone 2, which is colder than anywhere in the United States except for parts of Alaska. Flowers tend to be brightly colored, often with hues of pink and yellow on petals that gently layer over each other.

Potentilla resists deer well and grows nicely in wet areas. Flowers can bloom anytime in summer and tend to last for a long time, with the entire plant tolerating acidic, clay, and sandy soils. Potentilla also does well in containers, so you can easily put it on patios instead of deeper in your garden.

Rhaphiolepis

Rhaphiolepis indica
The most famous species is Rhaphiolepis indica from southern China, grown for its decorative pink flowers.
Scientific Name: Rhaphiolepis indica
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: East Asia
  • Plant Size: 6’
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 7-10

Rhaphiolepis, also known as Indian Hawthorn, is another relative of the rose family. This particular variety usually has pink or white flowers, with edible fruit if you care to grow it that large. It’s popular in bonsai, but it’s also a mainstay choice in many gardens where it performs excellently for small hedges.

Rhaphiolepis prefers warmer climates, and it’s one of the few shrubs rated for Zone 10 in North America. This is a worthwhile option for some of the hottest areas in Arizona, California, and Florida.

Rhododendron

Rhododendron ferrugineum
During flowering, Rhododendron needs more light.
Scientific Name: Rhododendron ferrugineum
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Asia, Western United States
  • Plant Size: 8’
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Mostly Sunny
  • Plant Zone: 5-9

Rhododendrons are a large family grown to display a wide variety of colors. Azaleas have somewhat different flowers but are fundamentally a subspecies of this popular hedge plant. Most rhododendrons are thick and woody, requiring minimal care as they aim to grow to their full size. Don’t plant them too close to houses, though, because they spread out.

Rhododendrons tend to bloom starting in the middle of spring, earlier than many other perennial flowering shrubs. It’s possible to cut the stems and make floral arrangements, but even without that, they’re evergreen and provide consistent coverage. Pollinators, butterflies, and hummingbirds all love these big bushes.

Rose

Rose Bush
Roses are one of the most popular shrubs around the entire world.
Scientific Name: Rosa
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Worldwide
  • Plant Size: Varies
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun
  • Plant Zone: 3-10

Roses are perhaps the most iconic flower globally, consisting of hundreds of species and tens of thousands of specific variations. Flowers tend to be large and fragrant, available in various shapes and colors to help match the rest of your garden. They’re also prevalent worldwide and thrive in all but the coldest and hottest climates.

While most cultivars focus on the flowers, some specific varieties (including r. glauca and r. rubiginosa) focus on their foliage, while r. moyesii noticeably emphasizes its fruit instead.

Shrub roses are easier to grow than many other varieties, with less need for care and fertilizer. Classic rose plants may require more experience in the garden, so those aren’t a good choice for anyone new to caring for plants.

Salix

Salix caprea
Salix is a rounded large shrub that is tolerant of adverse conditions and adds a graceful element to the small garden.
Scientific Name: Salix caprea
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Europe through Central Asia
  • Plant Size: 15’
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun or Mostly Sun
  • Plant Zone: 4-8

Salix is a hardy plant, with garden versions growing to about 15 feet, while wild specimens can reach 30 feet. The flowers grow from pink-and-red buds to an unusually string-like appearance of white on the inside and yellow on the tips. Salix blossoms in early Spring, and it requires minimal maintenance if left to grow naturally.

Sambucus

Sambucus nigra
Sambucus has small light beige flowers, collected in paniculate inflorescences, formed in the upper part of young shoots.
Scientific Name: Sambucus nigra
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Asia and North America
  • Plant Size: 10’
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Mostly Sunny
  • Plant Zone: 4-7

Also commonly known as Elderberry, Sambucus is a high-growing shrub with narrow leaves. Flowers tend to grow in tight clusters, with the petals often a shade of white or pink. Different species of Sambucus can have varied fruit colors, usually somewhere in the red to black range.

Sambucus grows well on slopes and fills space nicely. It also responds positively to hard pruning in the spring, though make sure to leave some old wood if you want to have blooms. It’s also a relatively rare shrub that does best in colder climates, particularly if you can give it moist soil.

Spiraea

Spiraea japonica
Spiraea species of ornamental shrubs of the Pink family, naturally growing in China and Japan.
Scientific Name: Spiraea japonica
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: East Asia
  • Plant Size: 3’
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Mostly Sunny
  • Plant Zone: 4-9

Spiraea is a hardy species, capable of thriving in all but the coldest climates. A relative of the rose family, Spiraea offers broad leaf cover that fits hedges well. Depending on the species, its leaves can lean towards more unusual colors like yellow or blue, providing an exciting contrast to the dense clusters of small flowers.

Spiraea requires good drainage but otherwise needs little maintenance aside from the occasional bit of fertilizer. Their flowers tend toward white, pink, or red and bloom for a long time to provide more color in your garden. Spiraea grows well in clay or sandy soil, and it tolerates containers well, so you can place it almost anywhere you want.

Syringa

Syringa vulgaris
Syringa is a multi-stemmed and deciduous shrub that can grow from 2 to 8 meters in height.
Scientific Name: Syringa vulgaris
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Europe and Asia
  • Plant Size: 9’
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun
  • Plant Zone: 3-8

Better known by its common name of lilac, Syringa is a famously fragrant shrub. Most species grow to around nine feet, but some garden cultivars will stop somewhere around three feet instead. Flowers can range from white to dark purple, with many large clusters on each shrub.

Syringa is a persistently popular choice in temperate zones because it’s easy to grow in well-drained soil, requires minimal maintenance, and smells fantastic while the flowers are in bloom. Lilac makes a good choice if you enjoy purple and aren’t sure what to plant.

Thuja

Thuja occidentalis
Thuja is a very adaptable evergreen conifer, that makes the garden come alive every day of the year.
Scientific Name: Thuja occidentalis
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: North America and Asia
  • Plant Size: Varies
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Mostly Sunny
  • Plant Zone: 3-7

Thuja is a well-known component of many gardens, where the larger tree versions often serve as a dense, natural hedge installed in place of a traditional fence. Thuja grows quickly to its full size but requires minimal care afterward aside from gently shaping it. Small, shrub-sized variants may grow as little as one or two feet high, providing evergreen color.

Flowers are relatively rare on Thuja, with just the occasional solitary flowers that help it pollinate. Thuja does well both individually, and when planted in a tight formation, so it’s perfect as an outside border for any garden. It’s quite dense, though, so expect it to give shade to any plants behind it.

Viburnum

Viburnum nudum
Viburnum blooms in small, white or pink, fragrant flowers in inflorescences.
Scientific Name: Viburnum nudum
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Worldwide
  • Plant Size: 6’
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 5-9

Viburnum is common in temperate and some tropical areas, with green leaves that eventually change to a rich red in Fall. The berries are similar, going from green when they’re not ripe to a mix of pink and blue hues that can last into winter if local animals don’t eat all of them. Flowers tend to be white, offering even more visual variety.

Viburnum is extremely wildlife-friendly, and you can get even more berries if you plant these in groups.

Vitex

Vitex agnus-castus
Vitex is a deciduous shrub that blooms in clusters of purple flowers in summer.
Scientific Name: Vitex agnus-castus
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Tropical and Subtropical Areas
  • Plant Size: 6’
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun
  • Plant Zone: 5-9

Vitex is a little-known member of the sage family, including a wide variety of aromatic and culinary herbs like mint, rosemary, and oregano. Its flowers usually come in the blue spectrum, growing in spiny clusters that attract butterflies and other pollinators. Notably, some variants can also help repel mosquitoes from yards.

Weigela

Weigela florida
Weigela loves moisture and grows quite well in the shade.
Scientific Name: Weigela Florida
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: East Asia
  • Plant Size: 12”
  • Sun Exposure:  Full Sun
  • Plant Zone: 5-8

A relatively compact shrub, Weigela is an easily-grown shrub with numerous trumpet-shaped flowers. Common varieties tend to have green leaves, but some cultivated species have a rich purple hue that provides variety for gardens. Flowers on Weigela trend bright pink, offering a good contrast with their darker leaves.

Final Thoughts

There are countless perennial flowering shrubs, from those with barely-seen flowers at limited times to options with numerous flowers that will hang around for weeks or even months. Whether you’re looking to have flowers throughout the year or just want to make a statement, perennial flowering shrubs are a great addition to any garden.

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