Morning Glory Varieties: 17 Different Types of Morning Glories 

Thinking of planting some morning glories to your garden, but aren't sure which type to choose? There are a number of different morning glory varieties that grow quite quickly in most gardens. In this article, we take a look at our favorite types of morning glory vines to plant in your home garden.

morning glory varieties

Did you know there are more than 1,000 different morning glory varieties? That’s a whole lot of morning glories that you can add to your garden! But that also means it’s probably confusing when you are trying to pick one of these popular flowering vines to plant.

Although all morning glories come from the Ipomoea genus, most of those 1,000+ varieties are cultivars of the nil, purpurea, or tricolor species. But, because there are so many different types of morning glory, it can get a bit overwhelming. The good news is that this gives you more options to choose from, in order to find the perfect plant for your garden.

So, out of all of these beautiful vines, which type of morning glory is the best fit for your garden? Continue reading, as this article covers 17 types of our favorite morning glory varieties that will look great in any garden!

Beach Morning Glory

Ipomoea pes-caprae
This variety is a spreading vine found on beaches from Texas to Florida to Georgia.
Scientific name: Ipomoea pes-caprae
  • Plant Type: Perennial 
  • Geographic Origin: Tropics of Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian Ocean
  • Plant Size: Vine
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 9-11Other name(s): bayhops, goat’s foot, railroad vine
  • Other name(s): bayhops, goat’s foot, railroad vine

The beach morning glory is a common perennial creeping vine found on the upper parts of beaches. It’s a strong sand-stabilizer that thrives in salty conditions. You can identify it by its broad evergreen leaves and light purplish-pink flowers.

You can find this variety most commonly on the shores of the Atlantic, Pacific, and Indian oceans. However, it’s an excellent choice for a garden due to its hardiness.

This variety has a strong root system and grows in mats, making it an excellent choice for groundcover. It does well in most conditions, although it’s particularly hardy in hot, salty, or windy conditions. Once established, they require little more than basic maintenance.

Black Kniolas

Ipomoea purpurea
Ipomoea purpurea is one of the fastest-growing, unpretentious, and therefore very popular annual vines.
Scientific name: Ipomoea purpurea
  • Plant Type: Annual
  • Geographic Origin: Mexico and Central America
  • Plant Size: 7-11 feet
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 2-11
  • Other name(s): N/A

Although not a true black, the black kniolas flowers in a deep purple that’s the darkest shade you’ll find. These pretty flowers have a pink center that fades into the purple petals, forming dark red stripes on the bloom itself.

A half-hardy annual, this climber is easy to grow. It’s the perfect choice if you want a great color contrast with your other flowers. It can grow up to 8 feet tall, so it’s not quite as large as different varieties.

In temperate zones, the black kniolas blooms all summer long. They also do really well in containers, so you can bring yours inside when it gets cold to keep it growing throughout the year.

Chocolate Rose Silk

Ipomoea nil Chocolate Rose Silk
Chocolate Rose Silk blooms profusely from June to the first autumn frosts.
Scientific name: Ipomoea nil
  • Plant Type: Annual
  • Geographic Origin: Mexico and Central America
  • Plant Size: 6-15 feet
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 2-12
  • Other name(s): N/A

The chocolate rose silk variety is one of the more subdued morning glories. Its mauve flowers and tri-lobe leaves aren’t as showy as some of the others, but the white picotee edge and 5-6 inch blooms still make it a great addition to a garden.

This twining annual is a rare variety, so you won’t see it too often. It’s also easy to grow and can reach heights of 14 feet. However, it’s not terribly prolific, so this is a good option if you want to avoid bringing in an invasive plant.

Common Morning Glory

Ipomoea purpurea
This variety blooms daily and fade by evening.
Scientific name: Ipomoea purpurea
  • Plant Type: Annual
  • Geographic Origin: Mexico and Central America
  • Plant Size: 6-10 feet
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 2-11
  • Other name(s): Tall morning glory, purple morning glory

The common morning glory is a vining purple flower native to Mexico and Central America. It thrives in the moist, rich soil of tropical regions, and has petals that are usually a gradient of purple, blue, and white. The leaves are heart-shaped, and you’ll find tiny hairs on the stems.

This variety can reach heights ranging from 6-9 feet. It also works well as ground cover as long as it’s well-maintained. Medium-sized 3-inch blooms appear in midsummer that will continue to bloom into the fall.

This variety is a fast-growing plant, so it’s important to consider growth control when planting. Be sure to use a trellis to keep the plant from taking over your space.

Crimson Rambler

Crimson Rambler
Crimson Rambler is an old-fashioned twining vine with a bloom that’s a cherry-red color with a white throat
Scientific name: Ipomoea purpurea
  • Plant Type: Annual
  • Geographic Origin: Mexico and Central America
  • Plant Size:  6-10 feet
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 2-11
  • Other name(s): N/A

The crimson rambler is a cultivar of the common morning glory that’s a bit more versatile. As a durable twining vine, this variety is ideal for covering things like fences, archways, or unsightly and immovable yard fixtures.

This dark pink flower is touched with red stripes and a white center. It thrives best in warm, humid conditions and well-drained soil. When maintained properly, you can get vines reaching up to ten feet long filled with 2-3 inch blooms.

The crimson rambler is a vining perennial in tropical climates and annual in non-tropics. And, like other varieties of purpurea, the crimson rambler is somewhat toxic.

Cypress Vine

Ipomoea quamoclit
Cypress Vine is usually grown as annuals, can tolerate temporary dry spells but prefers moisture.
Scientific name: Ipomoea quamoclit
  • Plant Type: Annual
  • Geographic Origin: Tropical America
  • Plant Size: 6-15 feet
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 11-12
  • Other name(s): cardinal vine, star glory, star of Bethlehem, hummingbird vine

Another lovely variety is the cypress vine. Although it’s a tropical native, it’s distributed globally. This variety thrives in most places, although it’s considered invasive in warmer climates.

The cypress vine is an ornamental that boasts small red flowers, lacy leaves, and can climb anywhere from 3 to 10 feet tall. If you choose to grow it outside, you’ll need to replant it annually. However, if you plant it in a container and bring it indoors in the colder months, you’ll have blooms all year round.

Hummingbirds and pollinators are especially attracted to the cypress vine. So, if you’re hoping to attract some colorful guests to your garden, you’re in luck.

Flying Saucers

Ipomoea tricolor
Ipomoea is a poisonous crop, only some species are used as indoor plants.
Scientific name: Ipomoea tricolor
  • Plant Type: Annual
  • Geographic Origin: Mexico and Central America
  • Plant Size: 8-10 feet
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 2-12
  • Other name(s): N/A

The flying saucer will be perfect if you want a stand-out morning glory with large blooms. This pretty flower has 5-inch periwinkle blossoms striped with white and a yellow throat that perfectly contrasts the blue.

The flying saucer has heart-shaped leaves and can twine up to 10 feet on a trellis or in a container. As an annual variety, you’ll want to plant in spring after the final frost. Then, you’ll get flowers starting in mid-summer.

In addition to being an attractant for pollinators, the flying saucer is also a good deer repellant. So, if you’re tired of chasing deer away from your flowers, consider planting these in your garden.

Heavenly Blue

Heavenly Blue
This variety’s flowers curl into tubules and acquire a light raspberry-red-violet color.
Scientific name: Ipomoea tricolor
  • Plant Type: Annual
  • Geographic Origin: Mexico and Central America
  • Plant Size: 8-10 feet
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 2-12
  • Other name(s): Granny Vine

The Heavenly Blue morning glory variety looks just as it sounds. This annual climber is a vivid sky blue with a white and yellow throat. The blooms grow from 3-to 5 inches across, and the leaves are a lovely heart shape.

This fast-growing, self-seeding variety blooms from early summer into fall in temperate zones. As a native of Central America, it thrives best in warmer climates. However, in a yard with full sun, you can get a plant that grows up to 10 feet.

This is another deer-resistant variety. It has the added benefit of being pest and disease-resistant, too, making it a good choice if you want something low-maintenance.

Japanese Morning Glory

Japanese Variety
This variety is an annual summer bloomer suitable for planting in all Climate Zones.
Scientific name: Ipomoea nil
  • Plant Type: Annual
  • Geographic Origin: Mexico and Central America
  • Plant Size: 6-15 feet
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 2-12
  • Other name(s): Picotee morning glory, ivy morning glory

Contrary to its name, the Japanese morning glory is native to the American tropics. It comes in various colors, but its most common hues are bright blue or reddish-purple. Some will even come out with pretty white stripes on their petals.

This ornamental climber doesn’t handle frost well, so if you’re in a temperate zone, you’ll want to bring your Japanese morning glories inside come winter. It’s self-seeding, though, so you won’t have to worry about replanting if you’re in a warm area.

However, just keep in mind that this is a larger plant. It can grow up to 16 feet tall and cover broad areas. Between its height and 5-inch flowers, this one really stands out.

Mexican Morning Glory

Mexican Variety
This variety is a delicate annual vine, that produces an enormous amount of beautiful flowers.
Scientific name: Ipomoea tricolor
  • Plant Type: Annual
  • Geographic Origin: Mexico and Central America
  • Plant Size: 8-10 feet
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 2-12
  • Other name(s): N/A

This variety is an ornamental climber that can grow up to 13 feet tall. Its white-throated blooms boast shades of blue and purple, and it has broad leaves, making it an excellent coverage plant.

You can grow this variety as a perennial in the tropics. However, since it doesn’t tolerate temperatures under 41 degrees Fahrenheit, you’ll need to replant it annually in temperate zones.

You’ll want to plant this variety after the final frost in mid-to-late spring. It grows well on walls, in containers, or along trellises. As a sun-loving plant, you should put it in an area with plenty of sunlight.

Milky Way

Ipomoea tricolor "Milky Way"
Milky Way is unpretentious in care but grows best in conditions of good or partial light.
Scientific name: Ipomoea tricolor
  • Plant Type: Annual
  • Geographic Origin: Mexico and Central America
  • Plant Size: 8-10 feet
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 2-12
  • Other name(s): N/A

The Milky Way variety gets its name from the white star shape in the center of its blue or purple petals. It’s an annual climber that provides blooms 3-4 inches wide with broad, spade-shaped leaves.

This plant can grow from 7 to 13 feet long, so it’s ideal for ground coverage. However, it’s considered invasive in some states, so it might be tough to find. Once it’s taken hold, it’s also very difficult to remove, so proceed with caution.

It flourishes best in the summer and temperatures above 70 degrees Fahrenheit, so whether it’s an annual or perennial will depend on your climate. That said, if you choose to grow this one, you’ll need to do proper pruning to keep it under control.

Mini-bar Rose

Mini-bar Rose Ipomoea nil
Mini-bar Rose has pink-red flowers with a white border.
Scientific name: Ipomoea nil
  • Plant Type: Annual
  • Geographic Origin: Mexico and Central America
  • Plant Size: 6-15 feet
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 2-12
  • Other name(s): N/A

A cultivar of the Japanese morning glory, the mini-bar rose is a smaller variety. It has bright pink petals with a white throat and accents, and green and white tri-point leaves. The small flowers and ivy-like leaves give it a delicate appearance.

This low-maintenance summer bloomer is ideal for hanging baskets or pots because it only grows to about 5 feet tall. Its size also makes it perfect for indoor growing. If you bring your flowering plants in at the end of the growing season, you’ll be able to keep this one growing all year.

Moonflower

Ipomoea alba
Moonflower is one of the types of night flowering Ipomoea.
Scientific name: Ipomoea alba
  • Plant Type: Perennial 
  • Geographic Origin: Tropical America
  • Plant Size: 10-15 feet
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 9-12
  • Other name(s): Tropical white or moon vine

If you want a flower you can enjoy in the evening, the moonflower is the only morning glory species to flower only at night. Its white blooms are huge, spanning 7 inches across, and they stay open through the night and often during the day if it’s overcast or cool.

Since this variety is native to the tropics, it thrives in 70-75 degree Fahrenheit temperatures. In areas where it’s native, it’ll grow as a perennial. In northern, more temperate climates, you’ll be able to grow it as an annual.

Rivea corymbosa

Ipomoea corymbosa
Rivea corymbosa is an evergreen liana, blooming with small fragrant white flowers.
Scientific name: Ipomoea corymbosa
  • Plant Type: Perennial Annual
  • Geographic Origin: Tropical America
  • Plant Size: 15-20 feet
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 11
  • Other name(s): Christmas vine, Christmaspops, snake plant, Ololiúqui, xtabentún

Rivea corymbosa is a perennial creeping vine native throughout Latin America. It’s a highly fragrant ornamental with yellow-throated white flowers and spade-shaped leaves. This variety is the most unique on this list.

The river corymbosa is the main honey plant in Cuba. Its nectar makes it very attractive to bees and hummingbirds. However, this might not be the best choice if you want to avoid attracting too many pollinators.

Keep in mind that this plant is invasive to the US, Spain, and Australia. However, it’s naturalized in many areas, including the Southern US. The seeds are quite poisonous, and they can grow to cover an area more than 30 feet long. Keep that in mind when you’re considering maintenance.

Scarlett O’Hara

Ipomoea tricolor Scarlett O'Hara
Scarlett O’Hara has cherry flowers with a white star in the center, flowering is especially abundant.
Scientific name: Ipomoea tricolor
  • Plant Type: Annual
  • Geographic Origin: Mexico and Central America
  • Plant Size: 8-10 feet
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 2-12
  • Other name(s): N/A

Named for the famous Gone With the Wine character, the Scarlett O’Hara morning glory is a showy, vibrant flower. It has pink and red blooms with white throats and pretty heart-shaped leaves.

This annual variety grows up to 10 feet tall and offers 3-4 inch blooms all summer long. It does best in moist, well-drained soil and full sun. Fortunately, it doesn’t require much maintenance, making it easy to grow.

Tie-Dye

Tie-Dye
Tie-Dye has magnificent purple speckled blooms.
Scientific name: Ipomoea nil
  • Plant Type: Annual
  • Geographic Origin: Mexico and Central America
  • Plant Size: 6-15 feet
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 2-12
  • Other name(s): N/A

If you want a flower that truly stands out, the tie-dye variety is it. Its splashy blue, purple, and pink shades have a watercolor appearance reminiscent of tie-dye t-shirts.

It’s an annual vine that blooms in the late spring to early fall, depending on your region. It’s pretty prolific, so you’ll get a lot of blooms on 8 to 10-foot vines. This variety is a climber, so have a trellis or other growing guide on hand. Aside from that, they’re simple to maintain and look great.

Wedding Bell

Wedding Bell Ipomoea tricolor
Wedding Bell flowers are funnel-shaped, 4-6 cm in diameter, and the color of the flowers is pink-lavender with a white base.
 Scientific name: Ipomoea tricolor
  • Plant Type: Annual
  • Geographic Origin: Mexico and Central America
  • Plant Size: 8-10 feet
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 2-12
  • Other name(s): N/A

A cultivar of the Heavenly Blue, the Wedding Bell offers vibrant lavender blooms touched with yellow in the center. It has smooth, hairless vines, heart-shaped leaves, and mid-sized 3 to 4-inch blossoms.

The Wedding Bell adapts to its environment, doing well in both sun and shade. It nearly went extinct in the early 2000s, but die-hard fans brought it back from the brink.

The most important thing to remember about Wedding Bells is that it’s temperamental regarding pollination. If a Wedding Bell gets cross-pollinated with another variety, mainly the Heavenly Blue, it’ll revert to a standard blue.

Final Thoughts

Morning glories are a lovely garden feature that offers early spectators a stunning show. The trumpet-shaped flowers are perfect if you enjoy starting your day with the sun. This gorgeous tropical flower comes in any color you can imagine, from creamy whites to nearly black. No matter what your style, you’ll be able to find something to suit your garden perfectly.

SHARE THIS POST
Hydrangea Next To Fern Companion Plant

Shrubs

15 Hydrangea Companion Plants For Your Garden

Thinking of planting some new plants along with your hydrangeas this season but aren't sure what plants are the best companions? Companion planting can be a bit tricky, depending on the plant. In this article, gardening expert and hydrangea enthusiast Jill Drago walks through her favorite companion plants for hydrangeas.

blue flowering shrubs

Shrubs

Blue Flowering Shrubs: 17 Blue Flower Bushes For Your Garden

Are you thinking fo adding some blue flowering shrubs to your home garden? There are a number of different bushes with blue flowers to choose from when picking out a new shrub for your home garden space. In this article, we take a deeper look at our favorites, with names and pictures of each!

clematis varieties

Vines

Clematis Varieties: 39 Different Types of Clematis

Clematis can be a beautiful addition to just about any garden. They are easy to grow, and have massively beautiful blooms that different shades of color to any garden space. But which type of clematis should you grow? There are many different clematis varieties, and many of them can accent your garden in different ways. In this article, we take a deeper look at our favorite types of clematis cultivars to help you decide which might be best to plant this season!

lavender varieties

Plants

Lavender Varieties: 31 Different Types of Lavender Cultivars

Thinking of planting some lavender this season but aren't sure which type to plant? There are many different types of lavender varieties, so picking the right cultivar for your hardiness zone is important! In this article, organic gardening expert Logan Hailey (who has worked on a lavender farm) examines 31 different types of lavender for your garden!

Shrubs for Shade Gardens

Shrubs

31 Shrubs For Shade Gardens and Shady Areas

Do you need some shrubs for shady areas of your garden? Perhaps you are creating an entire shade garden but aren't sure which shrubs to plant? The good news is, there are plenty of shade loving options, no matter your hardiness zone or geographic location. In this article, we look at our favorite shade-loving shrubs.

Orange Flowering Vine Growing Outdoors

Vines

11 Vines and Climbing Plants With Orange Flowers

Thinking of planting a vine with orange flowers this season, but aren't sure where to start? The good news is, there are many different vines and climbers that sport bright, beautiful, orange flowers. In this article, you'll learn all about our favorite orange flowering vines, and where they can grow.