71 Different Types of Hydrangea To Plant This Season

Thinking of planting some hydrangeas this season, but don't know where to start? There are many different types of hydrangea varieties you can plant in your garden. In this article, we take a look at some of our favotite hydrangea varieties, as well as the hardiness zones that they do the best in.

hydrangea varieties

Have you been trying to figure out which hydrangea to grow this season, but can’t quite make up your mind? With so many different hydrangea varieties to choose from, it can be hard to decide which will bring out the best in your yard. This flowering classic has dozens of varieties, and many of them are better suited in different geographic locations.

Hydrangeas are popular ornamental flowering shrubs that serve several purposes. First, of course, they’re a lovely addition to any garden. But many of the taller varieties also make great boundary lines. Or, if you want a compact container garden for your deck or patio, you’ll have your pick of dwarf varieties that can grow well in containers.

There are six predominant types of hydrangeas, and all cultivars will typically fall under these umbrellas. The six types of hydrangea are:

The most popular three, are the macrophylla, arborescens and paniculata. But the serrata and quercifolia have also seen a recent increase in popularity. So, which hydrangea is best for your garden space? Keep reading to learn all you need to know about some of the best cultivars of this timeless shrub!

Alice

Alice Hydrangea quercifolia
‘Alice’ Hydrangeas love slightly acidic soil, so its acidity should be in the range of 5-6 pH.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea quercifolia
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Southeastern United States
  • Plant Size: 5′ to 8′
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 5–9

An excellent option for a boundary shrub is Alice. This showy oakleaf hydrangea variety usually reaches heights of eight feet or more. Its pyramid-shaped panicles bloom white in June and gradually turn pink. The blossoms will turn brown in the fall, and the leaves will shift toward burgundy.

Alice likes full sun in the morning with dappled sunlight in the afternoon. Keep her soil well-drained and moist. As a cold-hardy plant, Alice will do well in zones 5 to 9. However, consider adding some protection in winter. Leaf blight, powdery mildew, and mites will be your biggest concerns.

All Summer Beauty

All Summer Beauty
‘All Summer Beauty’ is best grown in rich, well-drained soils in partial shade.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea macrophylla
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Japan
  • Plant Size: 3′ to 4′
  • Sun Exposure: Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 5–9

A bigleaf cultivar, All Summer Beauty produces mophead clusters of showy blooms. Since pH will affect the color, you’ll have either pink or blue blossoms that appear from June through September. With a maximum height of four feet, it works well around structures or fences.

All Summer Beauty prefers shady conditions but will handle full sun with the proper watering. It naturally grows in a rounded shape, so it doesn’t require much pruning. Just watch for common hydrangea nuisances, including aphids, powdery mildew, and leaf spots.

Amethyst

Amethyst
‘Amethyst’ Hydrangea is a dwarf variety that has beautiful pink and purple blooms.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea macrophylla
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Japan
  • Plant Size: 2′ to 4′
  • Sun Exposure: Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 6–9

If you want a summer-blooming dwarf hydrangea, the Amethyst will be perfect. It’s a bigleaf variety with mophead clusters of pale pink double blooms with green edges. pH affects bloom color, though, so your petals might be more blueish if your soil is acidic.

Amethyst prefers moderately moist soil in partially shaded areas. It’s a compact variety, so it won’t grow to more than four feet, making it suitable for around foundations or in pots. However, watch out for blight, mildew, and aphids, as those are the most common concerns.

Annabelle Hydrangeas

Annabelle Variety With White Flowers
‘Annabelle’ has beautiful white blooms and is a popular big leaf variety.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea arborescens
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: United States
  • Plant Size: 3′ to 6′
  • Sun Exposure: Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 6–9

Annabelle is a big leaf hydrangea that grows wild in the eastern United States. As a shade-loving variety, it’s a popular garden shrub in hotter climates. You’ll start to see fluffy clusters of light green blooms in the spring that’ll turn white through the summer.

This fast-growing variety does well up and down the Eastern Seaboard. It’s best to prune in the winter to keep growth under control for the following season. As with other hydrangeas, you’ll want to ensure your Annabelles have moist, well-drained soil. 

Avant-Garde

Avant-Garde Variety With Pink Flowers
‘Avant-Garde’ is a bush that has very large, dense pink flowers.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea macrophylla
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Japan
  • Plant Size: 3′ to 4′
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 5–9

Avant-Garde is a showy macrophylla cultivar that works perfectly for bordering structures or fences. Its 12-inch mopheads will bloom whitish-pink in mid-summer. Then, the flowers will gradually turn pale green over the next two months before wrapping up the season with a vibrant red.

This variety is quite cold-hardy, so it thrives well throughout most of the United States. It does best in moist, rich soil in a mix of full and dappled sunlight. Nuisances to look out for are scale, spider mites, and mildew.

Beni-Gaku

Beni-Gaku Cultivar Lacecap
‘Beni-Gaku’ is a rare Japanese hydrangea variety that produces spectacular lacy caps with colorful flowers.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea Serrata
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Japan
  • Plant Size: 3′ to 4′
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 5–9

Beni-Gaku is a small Japanese cultivar with the potential for multi-season ornamental displays. Its showy lacecaps can reach six inches across and boast multicolored blooms. A white and pale pink outer ring of larger flowers surrounds an inner cluster of deep purple. In the fall, the leaves will turn a deep red.

This colorful variety grows well in consistently moist soil. It can thrive in full sun, but partial afternoon shade is best. Although they’re all quite rare, aphids, scale, and weevils are some of the most common concerns.

Bloomstruck

Bloomstruck Cultivar with Different Colored Blooms
This Japanese native cultivar can grow up to about 3 feet high.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea macrophylla
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Japan
  • Plant Size: 3′ to 4′
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 4–9

To withstand harsh winters, hydrangeas in this particular series bloom on both new and old wood. ‘Bloomstruck’ has deep purple or rose blossoms on plants that grow up to 4 feet high.

They require four hours of direct sunlight each day and regular watering, but overall, they’re easy to care for. You can prune them as a shrub or a small tree in neutral-to-acidic soil. Aside from the typical aphids or mites, they aren’t susceptible to disease or pests. However, they’re toxic to humans and some animals.

Bobo

Bobo Cultivar in Garden
‘Bobo’ is a popular panicle hydrangea with white and pink blooms.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea paniculata
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Belgium
  • Plant Size: 2′ to 3′
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 3–8

Bobo is a robust dwarf variety of paniculata. Its panicles are sturdy, keeping the white flowers upright all season. As the blooms mature, they take on shades of pink and purple. The bush has a compact round shape that’s perfect for containers or walkways.

You should keep Bobo’s soil moderately moist and well-drained, especially in containers. Full sun to partial shade is best, with more direct sunlight in northern zones. The most common concerns are bud blight, aphids, mites, and mildew.

Bombshell

Bombshell Hydrangeas
Mature ‘Bombshell’ Hydrangeas do not need shelter for the winter, however, young hydrangea bushes need to be warmed in the fall.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea paniculata
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Netherlands
  • Plant Size: 2′ to 3′
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 4–8

If you need a cold- and pollution-hardy shrub for your garden or patio, the Bombshell hydrangea will give you what you need. It’s a small panicled cultivar with white star-shaped flowers that appear in July. As fall approaches, the petals will turn pink.

In warmer zones, Bombshell might continue to bloom into winter. It grows best in well-drained soil and dappled sunlight, making it an excellent patio option. Unfortunately, bud blight, mildew, and mites are some of Bombshell’s common nuisances.

Chantilly Lace

Chantilly Lace Cultivar
‘Chantilly Lace’ is a beautiful cultivar with cone-shaped white flowers that bloom in July.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea paniculata
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: United States
  • Plant Size: 5′ to 6′
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 3–8

The Chantilly Lace hydrangea is an average-sized shrub that offers delicate cone-shaped clusters of blooms with long, thin leaves. These late-bloomers blossom in July with white flowers. As they mature, they’ll shift toward pink.

Chantilly Lace can reach six feet in height and has various shaping options. However, it does best as a shrub. You’ll want to grow yours in well-drained soil and water them regularly. They’re somewhat susceptible to common hydrangea nuisances, including powdery mildew, blight, and rust.

Eldorado

Eldorado Cultivar With Red Blooms
The Eldorado hydrangea does best where it can receive full sun to partial shade.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea macrophylla
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Japan
  • Plant Size: 3′ to 4′
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 6–9

Spice up your garden with this brilliant red flower, the Eldorado hydrangea. This big leaf cultivar blooms in the autumn months. It prefers to grow in acidic to neutral soil. The bright exotic-looking flowers bloom on old wood, and attract pollinators such as bees.

Eldorado can reach heights of about 3 feet tall. To be sure your Eldorado grows its best, plant it where it will receive full sunlight or part shade. This cultivar is great for those wanting a hydrangea that isn’t your typical blue or pink.

Emerald Lace

Emerald Lace Cultivar
‘Emerald Lace’ is a compact shrub growing to 5 feet in height.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea arborescens
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: United States
  • Plant Size: 4′ to 5′
  • Sun Exposure: Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 4–9

Emerald Lace gets its name from its dense, emerald green foliage. Also known as Green Dragon, this variety has white lacecap blossoms that bloom throughout the summer and early fall. It’s a low-maintenance shrub that works well as a boundary marker.

You can prune Emerald Lace in the winter to encourage new growth. It prefers partial shade throughout the day, but it can tolerate full sun if you water it regularly. However, it doesn’t hold up well to dry conditions. In addition, Emerald Lace is more susceptible to scale and nematodes than other varieties.

Everlasting Harmony

Everlasting Harmony Cultivar
‘Everlasting Harmony’ is a shrub with pale pink and green flowers that grow best in well-drained soil and filtered sunlight.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea quercifolia
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Netherlands
  • Plant Size: 3′ to 4′
  • Sun Exposure: Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 6–9

Everlasting Honey is a quercifolia cultivar with pale pink and green blooms that make a beautiful addition to any garden. As a dwarf variety, it’s a good choice for a patio. It does best in southern zones, but consider year-round mulch to protect the roots if you’re further north.

If your soil is acidic, you may end up with blossoms with a slight blue tint. As they mature, they’ll fade to bright green. This plant does best with well-drained soil and filtered sunlight. Remember that it might need a winter pruning to remove old growth.

French Hydrangea

French Hydrangea
‘French Hydrangea’ is widely cultivated in many parts of the world in many climates.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea macrophylla
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Eastern Japan
  • Plant Size: 7′
  • Sun Exposure: Full and Partial Sun
  • Plant Zone: 6–9

French hydrangeas are one of many hydrangea macrophylla varieties. Although most people will picture periwinkle blooms, these mophead flowers also come in shades of pink. The color simply depends on your soil’s pH.

French hydrangeas are a good option if you want to try your hand at either a container garden or growing an ornamental shrub. They do well in shady areas with about four to six hours of direct sunlight. Avoid too much sun, though, because that’ll create an environment ripe for spider mites.

Gatsby Gal

Oakleaf Hydrangea
‘Gatsby Gal’ has beautiful cone like white flowers.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea quercifolia
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: United States
  • Plant Size: 4′ to 8′
  • Sun Exposure: Direct Morning Sun
  • Plant Zone: 5–9

The ‘Gatsby Gal’ is a snowy white variety of hydrangea quercifolia that are ornamental most of the year. Cone-shaped blooms appear throughout the spring and summer. Then, the leaves change to warm, vibrant shades in the fall.

‘Gatsby Gal’ grows best in well-drained soil with direct morning sunlight and room to grow. They prefer acidic soil, so adding a bit of peat moss can help them grow. Once mature, they’re more tolerant of dry conditions.

Gatsby Moon

Gatsby Moon Cultivar
‘Gatsby Moon’ Hydrangea takes on a pleasant shade of green as it ages, which lasts through most of the summer.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea quercifolia
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: North America
  • Plant Size: 6′ to 8′
  • Sun Exposure: Full to Partial Sun
  • Plant Zone: 5–9 

Gatsby Moon is a low-maintenance showy oakleaf that’s a good choice for brightening any garden. Its tightly-packed panicles boast double white blooms that fade to a vibrant green in the fall. The leaves complement the green as they shift from emerald to burgundy.

This shrub prefers sunny conditions, especially in northern zones. Zone 5 gardeners should consider burlap protection to prevent wind or cold damage in the winter. And, of course, always keep your eyes peeled for the most common hydrangea woes, including mildew, pests, and rust.

Grandiflora

Grandiflora Cultivar
‘Grandiflora’ is loved for its magnificent large blooms and frost resistance.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea paniculata
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Asia
  • Plant Size: 10′ to 25′
  • Sun Exposure: Full to Partial Sun
  • Plant Zone: 3–8

Grandiflora is one of the tallest hydrangea varieties, reaching up to 25 feet. Its size makes it ideal for a large hedge or barrier. However, for maintenance, it’s best to keep them below 10 feet and grow them in direct morning sunlight.

Grandifloras are easy to grow in moist, well-drained soil. The close-packed blooms start out white in the summer, then shift to pink, then brown in the fall. It’s winter and urban-hardy, making it pretty versatile. Also, keep an eye out for powdery mildew, aphids, and leaf spots.

Big Daddy

Big Daddy Hydrangea
‘Big Daddy’ blooms from June to September with beautiful pink or blue flowers, depending on the soil’s pH level.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea macrophylla
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: United States
  • Plant Size: 5′ to 6’
  • Sun Exposure: Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 6–9

Big Daddy is a popular macrophylla cultivar with a long growing season and offers lovely mophead clusters. The flowers bloom pink or blue depending on your soil’s pH. They’ll appear in June and continue into September. As the shrub ages, the blooms will be larger.

This variety doesn’t tolerate cold well, so shelter it in the winter. It needs very little pruning, but be sure the soil is nutrient-rich and moist. It suffers from all of the common hydrangea issues, such as powdery mildew, aphids, mites, and rust.

Bluebird

Bluebird  Lacecap Cultivar
‘Bluebird’ has deep green leaves, that are oval in shape, with notches along the edges.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea serrata
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Asia
  • Plant Size: 3′ to 4’
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 6–9

Bluebird is a showy lacecap variety that does well in southern zones. It’s relatively small but boasts eight-inch clusters of pink and blue flowers. The emerald leaves fade to red in the fall, making this a good choice for a multi-season ornamental.

Acidic or neutral soil that’s consistently moist is best for Bluebird. It makes a nice bed or container specimen. Monitor your leaves for common garden concerns, such as mildew, blight, weevils, and mites.

Cityline Venice

Cityline Venice Cultivar
‘Cityline Venice’ is a very compact plant, ideal for group plantings.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea macrophylla
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Germany
  • Plant Size: 2′ to 3′
  • Sun Exposure: Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 6–9

Cityline Venice is a compact macrophylla cultivar that’s one of the most low-maintenance hydrangeas available. Its pink or blue mopheads bloom on stiff stems that resist drooping. It’s also quite resistant to mildew and requires no pruning.

Cityline’s bloom season begins in July and lasts through August. It does best as a structured border or in containers. Although it resists pesky powdery mildew, don’t forget to monitor your shrub for other common hydrangea nuisances.

Dear Dolores

Dear Dolores Cultivar
‘Dear Dolores’ is a shrub that impresses with its purple-blue flowers that bloom from spring to autumn.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea macrophylla
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Japan
  • Plant Size: 5′
  • Sun Exposure: Full to Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 5–9

Another macrophylla cultivar that makes a lovely addition is Dear Dolores. This cold-hardy mophead boasts showy purplish-blue flowers from the spring into the fall. It works best as an accent specimen or border.

Dear Dolores tolerates most soil types as long as it’s well-drained. Consider sheltering in the winter if your area is prone to harsh weather. Always keep an eye out for leaf spots, mildew, blight, or garden pests.

Decatur Blue

Decatur Blue Cultivar in Garden
‘Decatur Blue’ can tolerate full sun only when grown in consistently moist soils.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea macrophylla
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: United States
  • Plant Size: 3′ to 4′
  • Sun Exposure: Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 6–9

Despite its name, Decatur Blue can vary from blue to pink if your soil’s pH leans more toward alkaline or acidic. Consider adding a soil acidifier if you want these mopheads to have a true blue hue. Its leaves will start out red, then fade to deep green in fall.

Keep Decatur Blue’s soil moist and well-drained, and consider a mulch bed if you’re in colder climates. Decatur Blue is hardy in Zones 6 to 9 but can tolerate Zone 5 with the proper shelter. It’s most affected by aphids, mildew, leaf spots, and blight.

Diadem

Diadem Pink Flowered Shrub
‘Diadem’ is a compact variety with intense pink or blue fragrant flowers.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea serrata
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Asia
  • Plant Size: 2′ to 3′
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 6–9

Diadem is a compact rounded shrub that offers delicate lacecap heads. The flowers will either be small pink or blue flowers surrounded by matching larger ones. The heads will grow to about six inches wide.

Since Diadem doesn’t grow more than three feet high, it does well as part of a container garden. You can also use it as part of a border mix. Give it full sun and moist soil, and take time to prune it a bit in early spring.

Diamond Rouge (Rendia)

Diamond Rouge Cultivar
‘Diamond Rouge’ Hydrangea buds varies from aquamarine to creamy white.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea paniculata
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: France
  • Plant Size: 4′ to 5′
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 3–8

Diamond Rouge is a shorter paniculata variety that’s particularly showy in midsummer. It has a similar look to Strawberry Sundae, although its panicles are denser and more prominent. They’ll start out white in July and gradually turn pink, then red in September. Its leaves will also shift toward red.

As a cold-hardy variety, Diamond Rouge does well in northern zones. It requires medium watering and well-drained soil. Consider mulching if you’re in Zones 3 to 5. Also, check your plants for common hydrangea diseases and pests periodically.

Emotion

Emotion Cultivar
‘Emotion’ has large dark green leaves and blooms with blue or pink flowers.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea macrophylla
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Japan
  • Plant Size: 3′ to 4′
  • Sun Exposure: Partial Sun
  • Plant Zone: 5–9

A lovely, sturdy garden addition is Emotion, a macrophylla cultivar. It blooms pink or blue in the spring on sturdy stems that help prevent drooping. Blooms will remain vibrant into September, giving this one a long bloom season.

You’ll want nutrient-rich, moderately moist soil in partial shade for Emotion. However, northern zones can offer a bit more direct sunlight. It’s a good choice for small gardens, borders, and containers. Watch for aphids, capsids, and scale, as they’re some of the more common nuisances.

Endless Summer

Endless Summer Hydrangea
‘Endless Summer’ is a large deciduous shrub blooming throughout the summer with wonderful pink or blue flowers.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea macrophylla
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: United States
  • Plant Size: 3′ to 5’
  • Sun Exposure: Partial Sun
  • Plant Zone: 4–9

Endless Summer gets its name from its long summer blooming season. Flowers will appear in early summer as either pink or blue, depending on your soil’s pH. They’ll continue to flower throughout the summer into fall. It’s great for brightening up a patio or bed.

This variety does best with morning sun and dappled shade in the afternoon. It prefers well-drained acidic soil, which will give it a blue tint. You can add a bit of lime to get more pink if you’d like.

Fire Light

Fire Light Cultivar
‘Fire Light’ has huge, early reddening blooms and very strong shoots.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea paniculata
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: United States
  • Plant Size: 5′ to 6′
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 3–9

Fire Light is a shrub that offers dense cone-shaped panicles that bloom white in early summer before turning pink. They end the season a dark pink. The stems are stiff, so you won’t have drooping issues. It’ll be an excellent addition to a foundation border or boundary.

Fire Light is pretty cold-hardy and adapts to most soil. Just make sure the soil is rich and well-drained. Then, prune in late winter to remove any old growth. Also, watch for all the common hydrangea issues, including mildew, blight, and pests.

Glory Blue

Glory Blue Hydrangea
‘Glory Blue’ Hydrangea has compact blue blooms that are quite stunning.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea macrophylla
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Japan
  • Plant Size: 3′ to 4′
  • Sun Exposure: Partial Sun
  • Plant Zone: 6–9

Glory Blue is a mophead blue hydrangea variety that offers periwinkle blossoms that might have a touch of pink. However, since pH affects the color, you can add a soil acidizer to maintain the bluer shade. This rounded shrub blooms in early summer and is relatively compact, so it’ll do well as a border or in a pot.

Always use moist, well-drained soil for Glory Blue. It does best with direct morning sunlight or filtered sunlight all day. You can prune in early spring, but otherwise, it won’t need much. Monitor for the most likely hydrangea concerns, such as mildew and mites.

Golden Sunlight

Hydrangea Golden Sunlight
‘Golden Sunlight’ grows well in nutritious, acidic to neutral soils, in partial shade.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea serrata
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Japan
  • Plant Size: 2′ to 4′
  • Sun Exposure: Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 6–9

A nice hydrangea variety for a container garden is Golden Sunlight. This compact cultivar gets its name from its vibrant yellow spring leaves. Its lacecaps have pink florets surrounded by white blossoms that appear in July and last through the summer.

Golden Sunlight does best in sheltered areas with dappled sunlight. Nutrient-rich, moist soil is a must for this shrub. Also, watch for common garden pests, mildew, leaf spots, and wilt.

Greenspire

Greenspire Hydrangea
‘Greenspire’ is a winter-hardy plant, after even the most severe winters it is able to quickly recover.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea paniculata
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Asia
  • Plant Size: 6′ to 10′
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 4–8

Greenspire Is a quite showy paniculata cultivar that boasts 12-inch multicolored panicles. The flowers bloom in midsummer with light green petals on the bottom that fade to white, then pink at the top. The blossoms will stay into the early fall.

Greenspire is remarkably tolerant of cold and pollution, making it a good choice for a city garden or boundary. It’ll need a bit more shade in southern zones in the afternoon, but otherwise, it’s pretty low-maintenance. The most common ailments are mildew, rust, aphids, and leaf wilt.

Hamburg

Hamburg Hydrangea
The color of ‘Hamburg’ blooms will depend on the reaction of the soil.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea macrophylla
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Japan
  • Plant Size: 4′ to 5′
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 5–9

Hamburg is a moderately cold-hardy macrophylla variety that offers multi-season shows. It blooms with eight-inch clusters in early summer with pink, purple, and blue mopheads. The flowers will turn burgundy as they mature and last well into fall.

The pH will affect Hamburg’s color, so test your soil if you’re unsure how it’ll turn out. Moist, well-drained soil is best, along with full morning sunlight. Watch for bacterial wilt, aphids, mites, and powdery mildew.

Hayes Starburst

Hayes Starburst Hydrangea
‘Hayes Starburst’ is the world’s first Hydrangea variety with double flowers.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea arborescens
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: United States
  • Plant Size: 2′ to 4’
  • Sun Exposure: Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 4–8

Hayes Starburst gets its name from its pretty star-shaped blooms that appear throughout the summer and early fall. The eight-inch mopheads will open in June and persist through September. Toward the end of the bloom season, the flowers will turn greenish.

This variety is particularly cold-hardy, but it doesn’t do well in dry conditions. It thrives best in the shade, but it’ll tolerate full sun with appropriate watering. Hayes Starburst generally doesn’t suffer from disease, but it needs to be monitored for blight, mildew, scale, and nematodes.

Incrediball

Incrediball Variety
‘Incrediball’ is one of the most popular hydrangea varieties.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea arborescens
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: United States
  • Plant Size: 4′ to 5′
  • Sun Exposure: Full and Partial Sun
  • Plant Zone: 3–9

The Incrediball is a showy arborescens cultivar. Its white blooms form clusters of up to 12 inches wide. This broadleaf variety grows to approximately five feet tall, making it a good option for a boundary or along a fence.

Incrediball is a fast-growing summer bloomer. They do well in full sun in the north, with partial shade in drier zones. As one of the more hardy varieties, Incrediball is resistant to drought and does well in Zones 3 through 9.

Invincibelle Limetta

Invincibelle Limetta
‘Invincibelle Limetta’ is a rounded bush formed by thin shoots, that blooms with green and white flowers.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea arborescens
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: North America
  • Plant Size: 2′ to 3′
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun
  • Plant Zone: 3–9

The Invincibelle Limetta is a dwarf shrub that puts out green and white blooms throughout its growing season. It has a rounded shape that makes them suitable for containers, gardens, or beds. They’ll need regular pruning, but otherwise, they’re pretty easy to maintain.

Invincibelle Limetta’s blooms will start in early summer as white, then fade to light green and deeper jade by fall. They’re cold-hardy, so northern gardeners won’t have a problem growing them. Although they’re resistant to disease and pests, keep an eye out for mildew, rust, and pests.

Invincibelle Mini Mauvette

Invincibelle Mini Mauvette Hydrangea
‘Invincibelle Mini Mauvette’ is a dwarf variety that blooms on the current year’s growth.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea paniculata
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: United States
  • Plant Size: 2′ to 3′
  • Sun Exposure: Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 3–9

Invincibelle Mini Mauvette gets its name from the lovely mauve blossoms that appear in June. It’s small and compact, making it a beautiful addition to a patio or container garden. The colorful mopheads will stick around through September when the leaves turn a bright yellow.

Although Mini Mauvette is cold, hardy, and tolerant of harsh conditions, it might struggle in colder zones. So, consider pruning it to the ground in the winter to allow it to regrow. Its most common nemesis are nematodes, scale, and mildew.

Invincibelle Spirit

Invincibelle Spirit Hydrangea
‘Invincibelle Spirit’ is a cold hardy hydrangea with beautiful pink blooms.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea arborescens
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: United States
  • Plant Size: 3′ to 4’
  • Sun Exposure: Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 3–9

Another favorite cold-hardy hydrangea variety is Invincibelle Spirit. It’s one of several Invincibelle cultivars. It has a long season, with dark pink clusters appearing in June that’ll shift to bright pink toward the fall.

It tolerates cold, but you’ll need to keep it constantly watered in drier climates. Be sure to prune old growth in the winter to make room for new. And always look for aphids, rust spots, and mildew among the rest of hydrangea’s most common pests.

Lady in Red

Lady in Red Hydrangea
For the ‘Lady in Red’ hydrangea to bloom in its reddest hues, provide it with moist, alkaline soil and filtered sunlight.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea macrophylla
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: United States
  • Plant Size: 2′
  • Sun Exposure: Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 6–9

Lady in Red is a multi-season lacecap ornamental. Its blossoms start out pale pink or blue in the spring, then gradually turn burgundy. Lady’s stems are a dark red that complements the leaves’ red veins. Come fall, the foliage will lean more toward purple.

Lady in Red makes a great border shrub. Use moist, alkaline soil in filtered sunlight to bring out the reddest hues. This variety is toxic to housepets, so take care if you have dogs or cats roaming your yard.

Lanarth White

Lanarth White
‘Lanarth White’ is a decorative perennial with tiny pink or blue blossoms surrounded by white.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea macrophylla
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Japan
  • Plant Size: 2′ to 3′
  • Sun Exposure: Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 6–9

Lanarth White is a late-blooming lacecap that provides tiny pink or blue blossoms surrounded by white in July. It’s a low-maintenance dwarf variety that will bloom from July into September. Its size makes it perfect for container gardens or borders.

Since Lanarth White isn’t very cold-hardy, you should shelter it in northern zones. However, it thrives best in Zones 6 to 9. Moist, well-drained soil works best with partial shade throughout the day. Monitor your Lanart White for aphids, mites, and mildew.

Lemon Wave

Lemon Wave Hydrangea
‘Lemon Wave’ thrives in moderately moist soils and partial shade. A unique feature is its leaves with white, and yellow stripes.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea macrophylla
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Japan
  • Plant Size: 3′ to 6′
  • Sun Exposure: Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 6–9

One of the unique things about Lemon Wave is its yellow, white, and green striped leaves. Depending on your soil’s pH, the lacecap blossoms will be light pink or blue and appear in July for about two months.

As a bigleaf variety, Lemon Wave will thrive in moderately moist soils with partial shade. However, consistently moist soil will make it easier to grow in full sun. It rarely needs much pruning, but you should always cut back weak or damaged growth in winter. Aphids, wilt, leaf spots, and mildew are the most common issues you’ll run into with this variety.

Lil Annie

Lil Annie Cultivar
‘Lil Annie’ is an ornamental, cold-hardy shrub that grows well in moist soil and in shady places in the garden.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea arborescens
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: North America
  • Plant Size: 3′ to 4′
  • Sun Exposure: Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 3–9

Lil Annie is an arborescens cultivar most common throughout the Eastern U.S. in rocky environments. Its fuzzy white corymbs are quite showy and can grow up to six inches wide. Because Lil Annie has a relatively long growing season, it works well as an ornamental border around a house or fence.

This shrub does best with moderately-moist soil in shady spots. It’s cold-hardy, so northern gardeners will have good luck maintaining it throughout the winter. However, Lil Annie is more susceptible to scale and nematodes than other hydrangeas.

Limelight Hydrangeas

Limelight Cultivar in Garden
A distinctive feature of ‘Limelight’ is very strong shoots that perfectly hold very large greenish-white flowers.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea paniculata
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Asia
  • Plant Size: 6′
  • Sun Exposure: Partial Sun
  • Plant Zone: 3–9

Limelight hydrangeas provide a showy display throughout their summer growing season. The large, dense panicles start out with lime green blossoms in July. The blooms turn pink before fading to deep red in the fall as they mature. As colder weather arises, the leaves shift toward red, too.

This cold-hardy shrub makes an excellent boundary shrub. It does well with full sun in the north, but southern zones should only limit direct sun to morning. Limelight will thrive in mulched, well-drained soil. Keep an eye on your leaves for common hydrangea concerns.

Little Honey

Little Honey Hydrangea
A less common variety, little honey has bright yellow foliage.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea quercifolia
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: United States
  • Plant Size: 3′ to 4′
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 5–9

Little Honey is a small multi-season ornamental that’s ideal as a hedge. Its five-inch panicles boast white blooms in June that continue to grow into the autumn. The leaves change with the seasons, shifting from golden, to deep green, then red in the fall. Come winter, the stems will be a warm burgundy.

This shrub loves morning sunshine but will do best with afternoon shade. Make sure your soil is well-drained and moist. The Little Honey variety is pretty easy to care for, but keep an eye out for powdery mildew, blight, and the occasional mites.

Little Lime (Jane)

Little Lime Compact Cultivar
‘Little Lime’ is a compact variety for people that want a smaller cultivar.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea paniculata
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: United States
  • Plant Size: 3′ to 5′
  • Sun Exposure: Full or Partial Sun
  • Plant Zone: 3–8

Little Lime hydrangeas are a cultivar of the larger green-flowering variety, Limelight. Its mophead panicles boast green blooms in mid-summer, fading to white, then pink by fall. Because Little Limes only grow to about three to five feet, they’re an excellent container or hedge option.

Be sure to give your Little Limes plenty of morning sun with more shade in the afternoon. They’re a hardy variety, so it won’t take much to care for them. However, they might be at risk for powdery mildew, aphids, mites, and other common nuisances.

Madame Emile Mouillère

Madame Emile Mouillère Hydrangeas
‘Madame Emile Mouillère’ prefers sunny places, light, fertile, moist soils, and does not tolerate stagnant water.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea macrophylla
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: France
  • Plant Size: 5′ to 6′
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Sun
  • Plant Zone: 5–9

Madame Emile Mouillere is a moderately cold-hardy shrub that offers vibrant white mopheads that turn pink as they mature. The flowers will appear in June and develop through September. In the fall, Madame Emile’s leaves will turn red and orange.

Partial shade and moderately moist, well-drained soil are best for this plant. However, water it regularly if you plan to plant in full sun. It does best around borders or boundary lines. Fortunately, it’s resistant to most bugs and diseases.

Magical Candle

Magical Candle Cultivar
‘Magical Candle’ is a compact, highly branched shrub with many fluffy buds.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea paniculata
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Asia
  • Plant Size: 4′ to 5′
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 3–8

Magical Candle is an average-sized paniculata variety that produces long, dense cones. The flowers bloom in upright clusters of greenish-white that eventually fade to pink over time. The stiff stems are great at preventing drooping.

This variety does well in cold or urban areas as a hedge or border specimen. You should plant it in nutrient-rich soil that’s moderately moist. Also, watch for spider mites, aphids, and the most common hydrangea diseases.

Mariesii

Mariesii Cultivar in Garden
‘Mariesii’ is a very old variety of hydrangea, bred in 1902 in France.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea macrophylla
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: United States
  • Plant Size: 4′ to 5′
  • Sun Exposure: Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 6–9

If you prefer your shrubs to bloom all summer, Mariesii might be a good choice. Its pink or blue lacecaps open in June and flourish through August. They’re accented perfectly with white-edged emerald leaves. Clusters typically reach about six inches across.

Mariesii’s size and rounded shape make it an ideal border specimen around fences or taller foundations. Moist, well-drained soil in dappled shade is best for helping it thrive. Bud blight, bacterial wilt, aphids, and mildew are your biggest concerns.

Mini Penny

Mini Penny Hydrangeas
‘Mini Penny’ is a compact cultivar with beautiful blue or pink blooms.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea macrophylla
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: United States
  • Plant Size: 3′ to 4’
  • Sun Exposure: Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone:  5–9

Mini Penny is a Pennymac cultivar that works well for patios or containers. It has compact mopheads with pink or blue flowers and deep green, mildew-resistant leaves. You can also use it as a bed specimen along borders or fences.

Mini Penny’s bloom season begins in July and lasts about two months. As with most hydrangeas, you’ll want to make sure your soil is moist and well-drained. Although its leaves are mildew-resistant, it can still attract aphids and other pests.

Munchkin

Munchkin Cultivar
‘Munchkin’ is a bush up to 4 feet tall with five-lobed leaves, that outwardly resemble oak leaves.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea quercifolia
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: United States
  • Plant Size: 3′ to 4.5′
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 5–9

Munchkin is a quercifolia cultivar that originated in Tennessee. It’s a dwarf variety that won’t reach more than four and a half feet in height, making it ideal for smaller spaces. Six and half-inch clusters open in June with white and pink blooms and jade green leaves that’ll shift to red in the fall.

Munchkin thrives in mulched, moist soil with direct morning sunlight. As with most hydrangeas, direct afternoon sunlight might be too harsh. You won’t run into any problems with Munchkin, aside from the standard powdery mildew or aphids.

Nikko Blue

Nikko Blue Hydrangeas
‘Nikko Blue’ is one of the most popular cultivars of macrophylla, growing up to 6 feet tall.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea macrophylla
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Japan
  • Plant Size: 4′ to 6′
  • Sun Exposure: Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 6–9

Nikko Blue hydrangeas are a mophead variety that produces loose periwinkle or pink clusters. The blooms appear in June and last for approximately two months. The shrubs grow to about six feet tall, making them a good option for a boundary line.

Morning sunlight is alright for Nikkos, but avoid too much afternoon exposure. They prefer moist, well-drained soil and overwinter well. While pH won’t affect growth, it will alter the color. Just be aware that they’re toxic to dogs and cats. Blight, mites, and leaf spots are common concerns with this variety.

Passion

Passion Hydrangeas
‘Passion’ is a compact bush with strong shoots. The foliage is dark green.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea macrophylla
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Japan
  • Plant Size: 3′ to 4′
  • Sun Exposure: Partial Sun
  • Plant Zone: 5–9

Passion is a cold-hardy, showy mophead variety with a long blooming season. Its flowers bloom on sturdy stems in mid-spring and continue until the fall. Depending on your soil’s acidity, the multi-layered florets will be blue or pink.

Moderately moist, well-drained soil in partial shade is the best environment for Passion. Its rounded shape won’t require much pruning, but you should trim back old growth in winter. Scale, weevils, and other common garden pests are all you’ll need to watch out for.

Pee Wee

Pee Wee Hydrangeas
‘Pee Wee’ is an ornamental profusely flowering erect shrub.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea quercifolia
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Asia
  • Plant Size: 3′ to 4′
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 5–9

The Pee Wee is a multi-seasonal ornamental hydrangea that works well in gardens or containers. Its cone-shaped panicles bloom white in June and gradually fade to pink. Its emerald leaves turn vibrant in the fall, and the red bark makes them lovely cold-weather shrubs.

This oakleaf variety prefers at least six hours of full sun in mulched, well-drained soil. It does best in Zones 5 through 9, but mulch is essential in higher zones. Leaf blight and powdery mildew are the most common problems to watch out for.

Penny Mac Hydrangea

Penny Mac Hydrangea
In more alkaline soil, ‘Penny Mac Hydrangea’ will produce a beautiful pink color.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea macrophylla
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: United States
  • Plant Size: 4′ to 6′
  • Sun Exposure: Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 5–9

Penny Mac is a cold-hardy microphylla cultivar with a June through September bloom season. Blossoms will appear blue or pink, depending on your soil’s pH. This mophead variety reaches four to six feet in height, so it does well around foundations.

Penny Mac’s rounded shape requires little pruning and does well in moist soil with partial shade. Although rare, it’s somewhat at risk for wilt spots, blight, and powdery mildew. Keep an eye on the foliage for any signs of disease.

Phantom Hydrangeas

Phantom Hydrangeas
‘Phantom Hydrangeas’ is cold hardy plant, that has beautiful pink blooms.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea paniculata
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: China
  • Plant Size: 6′ to 10′
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 3–8

If you need a superb cold-hardy hydrangea, Phantom will be an excellent choice. It can reach ten feet in height and tolerates the frigid temperatures of Zone 3. In addition, its sturdy stems prevent the green blossoms from drooping as they shift to white and shell pink.

Phantom works best as a boundary shrub or focal piece. Plant it in an area with rich, moderately moist soil and full morning sun. Northern zones will need more direct sunlight than warmer climates. Monitor your shrub for bacterial wilt, mildew, and leaf spots, and treat them immediately if they appear.

Pink Diamond

Pink Diamond Hydrangeas
‘Pink Diamond’ is a shrub with beautiful white blooms that turn pink in the fall.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea paniculata
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Asia
  • Plant Size: 8′ to 15′
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 3–8

Pink Diamond, also known as Interhydia, produces stiff-stemmed panicles with 12-inch cones. Its white blossoms appear in July and turn pink by September. Likewise, its deep green leaves will have a yellow or purplish color in the fall.

Pink Diamond’s height and rounded shape make it a good choice for a boundary. It’ll need moist soil with a few hours of full sun in the morning. It’s resistant to pollution and winter-hardy, making it quite versatile. Watch for blight, wilt, and mildew on this plant. Also, be aware that it’s toxic to many animals.

Pinky Winky

Pinky Winky Hydrangeas
‘Pinky Winky’ is resistant to adverse environmental factors, quite drought-resistant variety, and unpretentious in care and cultivation.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea paniculata
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Asia
  • Plant Size: 6′ to 8′
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 3–8

Pinky Winky is one of the most winter-hardy hydrangea varieties, making it a great option in northern zones. Dense pink and white clusters blossom in July and remain through September. In the fall, the leaves will fade from green to purple.

This cultivar has foot-long panicles and stiff stems, making it easy to prune into a tree. With proper care, it can reach eight feet in height. Pinky Winky loves morning sun with partial shade later in the day. Bud blight, bacterial wilt, and aphids are the most common nuisances.

Pistachio Hydrangea

Pistachio Hydrangea
These dual-tone blooms are vibrant pistachio green and deep purple or red.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea macrophylla
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Japan
  • Plant Size: 3′ to 5′
  • Sun Exposure: Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 5–9

This two-toned hydrangea has a real “wow!” factor. The petals on this big leaf hydrangea bloom in pistachio green with purple to bright red streaks. Gardeners in zones 5 to 9 will have good luck growing this variety.

Pistachio hydrangeas can be planted in part shade to full sun. They are fairly heat-tolerant once established. They also tolerate varying acidity levels. they are low-maintenance as pruning is not necessary. Simply remove any dead wood in the early spring months after new growth begins to appear.

Preziosa

Preziosa Hydrangeas
‘Preziosa’ has pubescent shoots with elliptical leaves and pink flowers.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea serrata
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Asia
  • Plant Size: 3′ to 5′
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 6–9

Preziosa is an average-sized multi-season ornamental that provides ruffled blooms in midsummer. The four-inch mopheads emerge pale green, then change from yellow to cream, and pink, before wrapping up the season with a vibrant red. Its leaves start out purple before turning green and red in fall.

Your soil’s acidity won’t affect Preziosa’s color, so you won’t have to worry about color consistency. Nutrient-rich, well-drained soil with full morning sun is the ideal environment. Pests generally leave it alone but watch for common hydrangea diseases, such as blight, mildew, or wilt.

Quick Fire

Quick Fire Hydrangeas
‘Quick Fire’ blooms earlier than most other paniculata hydrangeas, from June to September.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea paniculata
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Asia
  • Plant Size: 6′ to 8′
  • Sun Exposure: Full to Partial Sun
  • Plant Zone: 3–8

Quick Fire is a summer and fall-blooming hydrangea that thrives in Zones 3 through 8. It’s tolerant to harsh conditions, such as pollution or cold, but may need additional watering in high heat areas. This cultivar blooms white in the summer before shifting to pink.

Plant Quick Fire in a full-sun area up north and a morning-sun area down south for best results. As always, make sure your soil’s well-drained. This variety is toxic to humans and animals and is susceptible to bacterial wilt, powdery mildew, and leaf spots.

Ruby Slippers

Ruby Slippers
‘Ruby Slippers’ Hydrangea is decorative not only during flowering but also after the flowers wither.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea quercifolia
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Southeastern United States
  • Plant Size: 3′ to 4′
  • Sun Exposure: Full to Partial Sun
  • Plant Zone: 5–9

Ruby Slippers are a summer-blooming variety with white flowers that gradually shift to red. As a smaller shrub, Rubies usually only reach three to four feet in height. They’re a shade-loving plant popular in the southeast that thrives under tall trees. It’s important to note, that we typically don’t recommend planting hydrangeas under trees, but if they are taller, this variety can make it work.

This slow-grower prefers loamy soil in gardens or containers. It can grow in northern climes, but it’ll require more care than in southern areas. Rubies generally have no problems, but you might find the occasional mite, powdery mildew, or blight.

Sargent’s Hydrangea

Sargent's Hydrangea
‘Sargent’s Hydrangea’ prefers moist soil and partial shade and requires regular watering.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea sargentiana
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: China
  • Plant Size: 3′ to 6′
  • Sun Exposure: Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 6–9

Sargent’s Hydrangea is a showy lacecap bigleaf variety that was once native to China’s forests. It produces lacecaps with blue blossoms surrounded by white. However, pH can affect the color, so you might notice some pink-hued flowers in alkaline soil.

This summer-bloomer can reach six feet tall, so it’ll make a good boundary shrub. It prefers partial shade with moist soil, but it’ll tolerate full sun with regular waterings. Take care to prune out weak or damaged growth before spring. Also, keep a lookout for wilt, leaf spots, mildew, and common pests.

Sike’s Dwarf

Sike's Dwarf
‘Sike’s Dwarf’ is a very compact and beautiful shrub that enchants with its unusual leaves and delicate blooms.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea quercifolia
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: United States
  • Plant Size: 2′ to 3′
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 5–9

Sike’s Dwarf is a dwarf quercifolia cultivar native to the southern United States. It offers small flowers that start out white and turn pink, then brown as the season progresses. Its leaves will put on a show in the fall when they turn shades of bronze and red.

Sike’s Dwarf thrives in medium-moist well-drained soil with a mulch bed for moisture retention. Full or filtered sunlight is best. In Zone 5, consider doing a burlap wrap in the winter for added protection. Blight and powdery mildew will be your main concerns with this one.

Silver-Leaf Hydrangea

Silver-Leaf Hydrangea
‘Silver-Leaf Hydrangea’ blooms all summer with lacy caps of small and large white flowers, the underside of the leaves sparkles with silver.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea radiata
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: United States
  • Plant Size: 3′ to 6′
  • Sun Exposure: Filtered Shade to Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 3–9

Silver-Leaf Hydrangeas get their name from the underside of the leaves that flash silver when they flutter. It has a smooth rounded shape with delicate-looking lacecaps of small and large white flowers that bloom all summer consistently.

This variety is quite cold-hardy and tolerant of most soil conditions. However, it doesn’t do well with dry soil, so it must be kept moist and well-drained. It does best as a border or garden specimen. Monitor for all of the common garden pests and diseases.

Snowflake

Snowflake Hydrangea
‘Snowflake’ is formed as a charming undersized bush with large double inflorescences.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea petiolaris
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: United States
  • Plant Size: 5′ to 8′
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 5–9

The Snowflake hydrangea is a showy variety of Hydrangea petiolaris. It’s one of many varieties that you’ll find growing wild through the southern states. It’s also one of the more unique hydrangeas you could choose for your garden.

With a maximum height of eight feet, Snowflake makes a good boundary shrub. Its pyramid-shaped particles boast lovely double-flowers that bloom white in mid-summer. The petals shift toward maroon as they age, then purple in the fall. It’s pretty hardy in Zones 6 to 9 but will need additional shelter in Zone 5 winters. Common nuisances are mildew and certain mites.

Snow Queen

Snow Queen Hydrangea
The ‘Snow Queen’ flowers are initially snow-white, then turn pink in the fall.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea quercifolia
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: United States
  • Plant Size: 4′ to 6′
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 5–9

Snow Queen is a showy oakleaf variety that blooms in late spring. It produces white conical bloom clusters that fade to a pinkish-purple as summer passes. One of the nice things about Snow Queen is that it has rigid stems that help resist drooping.

This cultivar thrives in moderately moist with several hours of morning sun. Snow Queen does best in Zones 6 to 9. However, you could give it a try in Zone 5 with proper sheltering in the colder months.

Strawberry Sundae

Strawberry Sundae Hydrangea
‘Strawberry Sundae’ prefers moist, well-drained soil, and blooms in mid-summer with white flowers.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea paniculata
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Asia
  • Plant Size: 3′ to 4′
  • Sun Exposure: Full to Partial Sunlight
  • Plant Zone: 3–8 

Strawberry Sundae is a small but showy cultivar. It’s a hardy variety that’s a good choice for city gardens because it has a high tolerance for air pollution. It grows best in moist, well-drained soil.

Strawberry Sundae is one of the unique hydrangea cultivars. The blooms start out as white in the mid-summer. As they mature, they shift toward pink, then red. At mid-season, you’ll have a mix of pink and white flowers. You can keep this one as a shrub or prune it into a small tree.

Tardiva

Tardiva Hydrangea
‘Tardiva’ is one of the latest varieties of hydrangeas, bred in Japan.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea paniculata
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Asia
  • Plant Size: 8′ to 12′
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 3–8

Tardiva is a hydrangea that blooms white in late summer and turns pink in the fall. Its height and six-inch showy panicles make it an excellent choice for a boundary shrub. As a late-bloomer, this one gives shows into the fall.

This variety flourishes in humus-rich and well-drained soil. It’s cold-hardy and tolerates pollution, making it well-suited for a city garden or northern zones. However, keep a lookout for scale, mildew, and common garden pests and diseases.

Tuff Stuff

Mountain Hydrangeas
‘Tuff Stuff’ is a hardy hydrangea variety that grows in the mountains and prefers well-drained soil.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea macrophylla serrata
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Japan
  • Plant Size: 3′
  • Sun Exposure: Morning Sun
  • Plant Zone: 6–9

‘Tuff Stuff’ is a mountain hydrangea that has a look that’s a mix of lacecaps and big leaf varieties. Its leaves are lush, while their red, blue, and purple blooms grow in a similar disc shape as lacecaps. They flourish in the mountains, making them cold-hardy.

When planting this variety, use moist, well-drained soil with mulch for insulation and water retention. They’re an easy plant to grow and are unbothered by insects. However, watch out for powdery mildew and leaf spots, as they can infect your plant.

Vanille Fraise

Vanille Fraise Hydrangea
‘Vanille Fraise’ is a shrub with sparsely branched, erect, stiff shoots that bend under the weight of the flowers.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea paniculata
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Asia
  • Plant Size: 6′ to 8′
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Sun
  • Plant Zone: 3–8

Perhaps one of the prettiest hydrangea varieties is Vanille Fraise, which has a “strawberries and cream” look. Its gently-arching panicles start off white and change to dark pink, with a lovely multi-hued appearance as the season progresses.

Vanille Fraise does best in a mix of sun and partial shade with moist water. Soil acidity won’t affect the color, so you won’t have to fuss with altering its pH each season. Always monitor your Vanille Fraise for bud blight, powdery mildew, and wilt.

White Dome

White Dome Hydrangea
‘White Dome’ has fragrant numerous creamy-white blooms.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea arborescens
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: United States
  • Plant Size: 3′ to 5’
  • Sun Exposure: Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 4–9

White Dome is a white arborescens variety that works well as a border specimen. Its large leaves and six- to ten-inch mopheads provide a showy display throughout the growing season. Unlike many other varieties, White Dome keeps its color all season.

This variety has some minor susceptibility to powdery mildew, mites, and other common hydrangea nuisances. It’s relatively adaptive to soil conditions, but it doesn’t tolerate dry soil well. Moderately moist, well-drained soil is best to help White Dome thrive.

White Moth

White Moth Hydrangea
‘White Moth’ blooms from mid-summer to autumn with white globular panicles.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea paniculata
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Asia
  • Plant Size: 6′ to 7′
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade
  • Plant Zone: 3–8

White Moth is a paniculata variety that consistently provides white orb-shaped panicles each season. The clusters will usually have small green florets surrounded by showier white flowers. White Moth’s panicles can reach up to 14 inches in diameter.

White Moth’s bloom season spans midsummer into fall. It’s cold- and pollution-hardy, making it perfect for colder climates and city gardens. It’ll also work well as a boundary or tall backdrop. Keep your soil moist and full of nutrients, and always watch for and treat any pests or diseases. 

Zinfin Doll

Zinfin Doll Hydrangeas
‘Zinfin Doll’ is a beautiful new hardy hydrangea with many vibrant flowers that appear pure white before turning bright pink from bottom to top.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea paniculata
  • Plant Type: Deciduous Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: United States
  • Plant Size: 6′ to 8′
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Sun
  • Plant Zone: 3–8

Zinfin has a similar look to Pinky Winky, but its blooms are a bit fuller. Panicles are rounded cones of white and pink blossoms that darken gradually from the bottom up. Flowers are usually abundant for Zinfin, making this a showy boundary shrub.

As an early bloomer with a long season, Zinfin tolerates all types of soil and heat conditions. However, it doesn’t do well in dry conditions, so make sure your soil is always moist. Also, keep your eyes peeled for aphids, mites, mildew, and other everyday nuisances.

Final Thoughts

One of the best things about hydrangeas is that they’re a relatively low-maintenance plant once they’ve been planted and are acclimated to their soil. No matter what type of garden you are planning out, there’s a hydrangea variety that will suit your needs. From full sun, to partial shade, to fully shaded – this magnificent perennial shrub really can do it all.

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