Flowering Shrubs: 71 Different Types of Flowering Bushes

Thinking of planting some flowering shrubs in your home or garden, but aren't sure which ones are best? There are many different types of flowering shrubs, with many having different colors and completely different looks. In this article, we examine our favorite flowering bushes, with names and pictures of each!

Flowering Shrub in Garden

Fewer things make a garden or yard feel complete without the perfect blend of flowering bushes or shrubs. But as you embark on finding a plant, it might get you wondering—what’s the difference between a bush and shrub, and which is the best for you?

Bushes and shrubs both share the characteristics of being woody plants. However, Bushes are low-lying trees, so the tips of their leaves touch the soil. In contrast, shrubs are plants that you prune and groom. Shrubs can also grow slightly taller than bushes and always sprout multiple stems. But these terms are often used interchangeably.

That said, most people use the words bushes and shrubs interchangeably, and in the case of bushes, that’s accurate; all bushes are shrubs. For this reason, you’ll likely always hear gardeners and horticulturists calling their plants shrubs.

We’ll present you with some of the most popular flowering shrubs and bushes that fit a range of USDA zones. Furthermore, while many of these plants are the stars of the show for their brilliant flowers, some also produce edible fruit and have medicinal properties.

Most bushes and shrubs require partial to full sunlight. So, you’ll have the greatest opportunity for shrub choices if you plan on planting them in a well-lit area. Finally, when comparing the heights of these plants, keep in mind that you can keep them pruned to the size you desire.

Abelia

Abelia grandiflora
Abelia is cultivated as an ornamental plant both in pots and gardens, due to its peculiar flowering.
Scientific Name: Abelia grandiflora
  • Plant Type: Deciduous or evergreen shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Eastern Asia
  • Plant Size: 3 – 6 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Partial or full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 9

The medium-sized Abelia is a looker for using as a hedgerow and in gardens. It produces an abundance of small, white bell-shaped flowers with pink hues from late spring to the fall.

When this plant isn’t in bloom, you’ll enjoy glossy, deep green leaves in the early spring, which turn to a brilliant purplish-orange come autumn. We recommend pruning this plant in the late winter, given that it requires new wood for a full bloom.

Andromeda

Pieris japonica
Andromeda is unpretentious in choosing a place. It can grow both in sunny areas and in the shade.
Scientific Name: Pieris japonica
  • Plant Type: Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Asia
  • Plant Size: 9 – 12 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Partial or full sun
  • Plant Zone: 5 – 7

Andromeda is an excellent flowering plant if you’re looking for flowers during the off-season. This shrub’s pink flower buds appear in the late summer before they bloom in the late winter and early spring. Although the blooms themselves only stay around for 2 – 3 weeks, their buds are so showy that it feels like they’re around for much longer.

You should plant Andromeda in acidic, nutrient-dense soil. They prefer moderate water, as they’ll die if their roots get too wet. Keeping them away from windy winter weather will also maximize their chance for success.

Annabelle

Hydrangea arborescens
Annabelle is a beautiful flowering shrub and one of the more popular hydrangeas.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea arborescens
  • Plant Type: Deciduous shrub
  • Geographic Origin: North America
  • Plant Size: 3 – 6 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Dappled shade or full sun
  • Plant Zone: 3 – 9

Annabelles are a type of hydrangea with flowers that resemble snowballs when they’re in bloom, from May to July. Before then, their buds have a light green color, blending in with their large, ribbed leaves.

People sometimes call the Annabelle “seven bark” because its stem peels off, with each layer containing a different color. While you can grow these hydrangeas in your garden, you might be able to find them in a hardwood forest or along riverbanks versus visiting a nursery.

Apple Serviceberry

Amelanchier x grandiflora
Apple Serviceberry is a wonderful four-season tree, it tolerates drought but not wind.
Scientific Name: Amelanchier x grandiflora
  • Plant Type: Multi-stemmed shrub
  • Geographic Origin: North America
  • Plant Size: 15 – 25 feet
  • Sun Exposure: Partial to full sun
  • Plant Zone: 3 – 8

Apple Serviceberries are flowering shrubs that produce edible berries. Many people cook down these berries for jam, but you can also eat them raw or dried. The flowers come in pink and white colors with 4 – 5 petals that form in the spring and have a long bloom season.

These plants like soil with good drainage, but they often hold up well in short flooding conditions. They’re a perfect fit for people with deer issues, as most deer won’t touch them.

Arrowwood

Viburnum dentatum
Arrowwood needs a moderate amount of moisture in the soil, although mature plants have some drought tolerance.
Scientific Name: Viburnum dentatum
  • Plant Type: Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: North America
  • Plant Size: 6 – 10 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Partial or full sun
  • Plant Zone: 2 – 8

The beautiful Arrowwood is a shrub that produces arching stems that boast dozens of small white flowers. The flowers grow in clusters, forming a flat-top appearance. When they disappear, deep blue berries appear, which are a favorite among some birds.

Arrowwoods grow best in acidic soil that has a sandy base. As a result, they need good drainage. Provided they have that, they can tolerate both drought and flooding well. They also have pest-free and disease-resistant properties.

Azalea

Rhododendron spp
Azalea has star-shaped or bell-shaped flowers, in shades of red, pink, purple and white, and less commonly orange.
Scientific Name: Rhododendron spp.
  • Plant Type: Deciduous or evergreen shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Asia, Europe, North America
  • Plant Size: 3 – 20 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Partial to full sun
  • Plant Zone: 3 – -9

Azaleas are beautiful flowering bushes that bloom in the mid-spring. These versatile plants come in many heirloom varieties, meaning you can pick just about any flower color or color combination that you can imagine. They’re also known for their thick leaves.

If you live in a warm enough climate, Azaleas remain evergreen. However, in most parts of the world, they’re deciduous. The slow-growing Azalea takes up to ten years to reach its adult size and requires a pH ranging from 4.5 – 6.0.

Barberry

Berberis thunbergii
The smell of flowering barberry attracts bees and other pollinators.
Scientific Name: Berberis thunbergii
  • Plant Type: Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Japan
  • Plant Size: 3 – 6 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 4 – 8

The barberry is one of the flowering shrubs we’re covering here that’s equally known for its flowers and berries. In the spring, you’ll enjoy seeing its pale yellow flowers. When autumn rolls around, those flowers turn to bright red fruits.

Although you can eat barberry fruits, they’re tart, so it’s best to include them in recipes with other ingredients. People love using barberry as ornamental hedging, but you have to take care if you have animals or young children, as they have spiny branches.

Beautyberry

Callicarpa americana
Beautyberry berries appear in late summer or early autumn and may persist until winter.
Scientific Name: Callicarpa americana
  • Plant Type: Perennial shrub
  • Geographic Origin: North America
  • Plant Size: 3 – 6 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Partial or full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 10

If purple is more your color than red, planting Beautyberry in your yard is a great option instead. However, we won’t beat around the “bush”—of the flowering bushes we’re covering here, Beautyberry’s pinkish-light purple flowers aren’t showstoppers. However, its purple fruit is.

These berries ripen during September and October and become a favorite among birds, deer, and even humans. Don’t go overboard if you eat them, though; they are astringent, causing stomach issues. You can also use these berries as a natural mosquito repellent.

Blue Beard

Caryopteris x clandonensis
Blue Beard is a rustic ornamental plant, resistant to drought, cold and most diseases.
Scientific Name: Caryopteris x clandonensis
  • Plant Type: Deciduous shrub or woody perennial
  • Geographic Origin: East Asia
  • Plant Size: 2 – 4 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6b – 9a

Blue Beards are one of the smaller shrubs on this list. They have a mounding nature and bring color to gardens in the late summer and early fall. This shrub has deep purple flowers. The flowers themselves have a fluffy-like appearance, and they attract butterflies.

Too much of a good thing is bad with Blue Beards, as they don’t tolerate lots of fertilizer well. Instead, give them loamy soil and ensure it’s loose so that its roots have plenty of room to grow.

Blueberry

Vaccinium
Blueberries are a honey plant and during flowering season are visited by many pollinators.
Scientific Name: Vaccinium
  • Plant Type: Perennial shrub
  • Geographic Origin: North America
  • Plant Size: 1 – 8 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 3 – 9

Yes, you’re reading that right—blueberries are shrubs that produce pretty flowers and the fruit that so many of us adore. Starting in the spring or early summer (depending on the climate), you’ll see blueberry flowers appear in red, pink, and white varieties.

But even when the flowers fall, the fruit that replaces them grow in clusters, making them look like flowers from afar. The fruit turns from green to pink to blue, so watching it in your garden is a joy. Blueberries grow best in acidic soil with a moderate amount of moisture.

Blue Blossom

Ceanothus thyrsiflorus
Blue Blossom has small fragrant flowers are collected in numerous fluffy panicles of the rarest color in nature – blue.
Scientific Name: Ceanothus thyrsiflorus
  • Plant Type: Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: North America
  • Plant Size: 4 – 12 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Partial or full sun
  • Plant Zone: 7 – 10

If you’re on the market for showy flowering bushes, it’s hard to beat the Blue Blossom. Its flowers have a puffy-like appearance, with individual star-shaped flowers clustering together to form the puffs. To top it off, each flower has little yellow balls on its tips.

Best of all, Blue Blossoms are versatile. These blue flowering shrubs can grow on slopes or in hot climates as long as they have shade. However, take care when watering Blue Blossoms in the summer, as too much water can shorten their flowering season.

Bougainvillea

Bougainvillea spp
A popular ornamental plant in hotter locations Bougainvillea has brightly colored thin paper-like blooms.
Scientific Name: Bougainvillea spp.
  • Plant Type: Perennial shrub
  • Geographic Origin: South America
  • Plant Size: 2 – 40 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 9 – 11

There is no shortage of Bougainvillea flower colors to choose from. These shrubs bloom in orange, yellow, and more popularly pink or red. They thrive in warm climates and offer their paper-like flowers year-round.

As a warning, be careful when handling Bougainvillea because it has thorns. Nurseries often carry a variety of Bougainvillea varieties to match how tall you want this shrub to grow. You’ll need to keep this plant trimmed after each bloom cycle to encourage it to continue flowering.

Bright Gold Yew

Taxus cuspidata
The only non-poisonous part of the Bright Gold Yew is the bright red seed pod around the seeds.
Scientific Name: Taxus cuspidata
  • Plant Type: Evergreen shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Japan
  • Plant Size: 4 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Partial sun to full shade
  • Plant Zone: 4 – 7

We’re taking a bit of liberty here calling the Bright Gold Yew a beautiful flowering shrub, but here’s why: This plant produces golden-yellow needles that sit atop deeper green needle colors. Therefore, the “flowers” that appear on these plants are actually yellow needles.

Bright Gold Yews require flood-free planting zones and well-draining soil as they often develop root rot. To maximize their yellow needle color, we recommend planting them in an area that receives full sun.

Broom

Cytisus Plant
Broom is a shrub that is not afraid of high temperatures.
Scientific Name: Cytisus spp.
  • Plant Type: Evergreen shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Europe
  • Plant Size: 6 – 8 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 5 – 8

The Broom gets its name because of its lengthy, sweeping, thin stems that grow yellow, pink, or white flowers, making it look like the prettiest Broom you’ve ever seen. These flowering bushes do best with March prunings to help them maintain an even appearance.

Many different Broom shrubs exist, so you can choose the variety from your garden store that calls your attention the most. They prefer neutral soil and have excellent frost-resistant properties. 

Butterfly Bush

Buddleia davidii
Butterfly Bush blooms at the end of summer and blooms for a month and a half.
Scientific Name: Buddleia davidii
  • Plant Type: Deciduous shrub
  • Geographic Origin: China
  • Plant Size: 4 – 12 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 5 – 9

The beautiful butterfly bush does just what its name implies—attracts butterflies via its large, purple flowers. As this plant ages, its bark becomes fissured, although you’ll have trouble noticing the change thanks to its long leaves and massive arching flowers.

Although Butterfly Bushes provide nectar for butterflies, you don’t have to worry about a caterpillar invasion since they don’t offer them the food they need. Hard pruning in the spring is the best option for this plant to maximize flower production.

Camellia

Camellia
Camellia is an evergreen shrub with glossy, dark green leaves and beautiful flowers.
Scientific Name: Camellia
  • Plant Type: Evergreen shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Japan, China, Korea
  • Plant Size: 2 – 12 feet
  • Sun Exposure: Partial shade
  • Plant Zone: 7 – 9

Depending on the species, the Camellia doesn’t try to hide its beautiful flowers, which boast 5 – 9 large petals. White, pink, and red are the most common colors unless you’re in South China and Vietnam. In these countries, you can find genuinely yellow Camellia flowers.

When the Camellia isn’t in bloom, it has large, glossy leaves that are an attraction on their own. Humus and acidic soils are best for this plant, as you should avoid chalky and calcium-rich soils.

Carolina Allspice

Calycanthus floridus
Carolina Allspice flowers exude a strong fruity-spicy aroma that can combine the smells of apples, strawberries, pineapple, cinnamon or cloves.
Scientific Name: Calycanthus floridus
  • Plant Type: Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Southeast United States
  • Plant Size: 6 – 9 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Shade to full sun
  • Plant Zone: 5b – 10a

The mystical-looking Carolina Allspice produces deep reddish-orange flowers with two layers of thin petals. The first layer lays mostly flat, and the second layer curls up around its center.

If you love natural tea, you can pick some Carolina Allspice flower petals for your next brew. Just take care, as it contains alkaloids, which can cause heart convulsions. Carolina Allspice prefers moist soil and holds up well against insects and disease. Nevertheless, crown gulls on its stems are a frequent issue it encounters.

Ceratostigma

Ceratostigma willmottianum
Ceratostigma is an airy, voluminous and loose bush with blue flowers that bloom from August to October.
Scientific Name: Ceratostigma willmottianum
  • Plant Type: Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: China, Tibet
  • Plant Size: 2 – 4 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Partial to full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 9

Ceratostigma gives flower lovers a double color whammy: It produces pretty cobalt-blue flowers in the fall with a backdrop of deep red leaves. Its leaves aren’t always red, though. Instead, they turn from green to red in autumn.

To help these flowers look their best each year, cut away the dead ones in the spring. You should also keep this plant away from a lot of wind.

Chinese Fringe Flower

Loropetalum chinense
Chinese Fringe Flower shrub is ideal for container growing.
Scientific Name: Loropetalum chinense
  • Plant Type: Evergreen shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Asia
  • Plant Size: 6 – 10 feet
  • Sun Exposure: Partial to full sun
  • Plant Zone: 7b – 9a

The Chinese Fringe Flower derives from the witch hazel family, meaning that you’ll get to enjoy beautiful flowers. Its star-like petals hang down and produce a lovely fragrance for people walking close to it. Sadly, these flowers only last for 2 – 3 weeks. However, this plant’s deep purplish-green leaves make it a beautiful shrub year-round.

You should plant Chinese Fringe Flowers in well-draining, acidic soil. It’s an excellent shrub for borders and screens, and it holds up well if you transplant it.

Chokeberry

Aronia melanocarpa
Chokeberry is an easy-to-grow plant that produces healthy, edible berries.
Scientific Name: Aronia melanocarpa
  • Plant Type: Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: North America
  • Plant Size: 3 – 6 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Partial to full sun
  • Plant Zone: 3 – 8

Chokeberries are shrubs that produce pretty white or pink flowers that last from the end of spring to early fall. Once September rolls around, the flowers give way to clusters of dark purple berries. While the berries are edible, most people use them in recipes with sugar to tame their tartness.

It’ll be hard to tell from looking at it, but Chokeberry belongs to the rose family. It’s a hardy plant, tolerating the cold well. Should you wish to propagate this plant, the summer is the best time to take cuttings.

Cinquefoil

Potentilla fruticosa
For Cinquefoil, pruning will be absolutely necessary.
Scientific Name: Potentilla fruticosa
  • Plant Type: Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Northern United States, Canada, Europe, Northern Asia
  • Plant Size: 2 – 4 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Partial to full sun
  • Plant Zone: 2 – 7

Cinquefoil is a landscaper’s go-to shrub, as it has an exceptionally long bloom time, brightening lawns with its bright yellow flowers. It can also grow in various climates, and it has excellent tolerance for wind. That said, you should avoid planting it in dry, hot areas.

If you have an upset stomach or struggle with inflammation, Cinquefoil’s flowers and leaves have medicinal properties to alleviate them. Although this shrub produces strawberry-looking fruit, it isn’t edible.

Common Lilac

Syringa vulgaris
Common Lilac is a luxurious shrub, extremely hardy, which grows well outdoors and decorates gardens in spring with large inflorescences of its fragrant flowers.
Scientific Name: Syringa vulgaris
  • Plant Type: Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Europe
  • Plant Size: 8 – 15 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 3 – 7

Don’t let the word “Common” in this Lilac’s name fool you—it’s a staple fragrant shrub for anyone in its growing region. It’s hard not to love this plant, given its hardy, deer-resistant, and pest-free properties. Lilacs are easy to grow, and relatively low maintenance, as long as you plant them in the proper hardiness zones.

Furthermore, you’ll enjoy 3 – 4 weeks of this flowering shrub in the spring. You can choose from a range of colors, from traditional purple to magenta and cream. While Lilacs can tolerate partial shade, we recommend keeping them in full sun for maximum flower production.

Coronilla

Coronilla valentina
Coronilla blooms with an abundance of small, pale lemon-yellow to creamy-yellow flowers in February and March.
Scientific Name: Coronilla valentina
  • Plant Type: Evergreen shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Mediterranean Basin
  • Plant Size: 2 – 3 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 8 – 9

The Coronilla shrub produces messy-looking flowers in the best way possible. Its yellow petals have significant gaps between them and twist and sprawl against its thick little heart-shaped leaves in various directions. It’s truly a masterpiece, and its flowers remain through the spring and summer.

If you decide to plant Coronilla, you’ll need to put your green thumb to the test. Because this shrub is from the Mediterranean, it requires arid conditions to survive.

Cotoneaster

Cotoneaster horizontalis
Cotoneaster has glossy green leaf plates, having a rounded shape, changing their color to fiery red in autumn.
Scientific Name: Cotoneaster horizontalis
  • Plant Type: Deciduous shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Western China
  • Plant Size: 2 – 3 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 5 – 7

The Cotoneaster is a stunner with its herring-bone pattern branches that boast pinkish-white flowers in the late spring. It also has glossy, round leaves that turn brilliant red and orange colors in the fall. And that’s not all—its flowers give way to picturesque little red berries.

Cotoneasters grow two to three times as wide as they do tall, so they’re excellent shrubs for hedgerows. The downside is that they spread rapidly, so removing their seedlings each year is crucial. They’ll also need frequent pruning to maintain their shape.

Daphne

Daphne bholua
In early spring, clusters of flowers with a strong sweet aroma appear on the Daphne shrub.
Scientific Name: Daphne bholua
  • Plant Type: Evergreen shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Eurasia
  • Plant Size: 1–5 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun to part shade
  • Plant Zone: 4 – 9

Daphne is an altitude-loving shrub that grows in the wild along forest edges and pastures. However, it’s become a favorite ornamental plant in modern-day gardens thanks to its pink, fragrant flowers. It also has leathery leaves that kids love to play with.

In the past, Nepal used Daphne to make paper and rope. Although they traditionally also used its bark and roots to cure fevers, the plant contains many poisonous properties, so you shouldn’t try it yourself.

Dappled Willow

Salix integra
Dappled Willow is a small, compact shrub with vertical branches and variegated foliage.
Scientific Name: Salix integra
  • Plant Type: Evergreen shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Europe, Asia, Africa
  • Plant Size: 1 – 5 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Partial to full sun
  • Plant Zone: 4 – 9

Dappled Willow shrubs have a willow-like appearance in a dwarf-size form. They have flowing branches with thin leaves that contain mottled streaks of pink and white mixed with green. Because of its colorful leaves and evergreen nature, Dappled Willows are for adding color to landscapes in the winter.

The Dappled Willow produces pretty yellow flowers, but its main color attraction is its leaves, which can resemble colorful flowers from afar. They grow well in acidic and poor-quality soil.

Deutzia

Deutzia gracilis
Deutzia blooming is a beautiful sight, pleasing to the eye for about three weeks.
Scientific Name: Deutzia gracilis
  • Plant Type: Deciduous shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Asia
  • Plant Size: 2 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 5 – 8

The Deutzia shrub looks fit for a wedding when it’s in bloom, given that hundreds of small white flowers turn it into a flower lover’s paradise. To top it off, it has gently arching branches, giving this shrub an elegant appearance.

Sadly, Deutzia’s flowers have a maximum lifespan of two weeks. However, its leaves put on a show in the fall, turning to a burgundy color. If you have salty or clay soil, you’ll likely have great success planting Deutzia.

Dwarf Bottlebrush

Callistemon spp
Dwarf Bottlebrush needs a lot of bright sunlight, otherwise, it will bloom poorly.
Scientific Name: Callistemon spp.
  • Plant Type: Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Australia
  • Plant Size: 3 – 5 feet
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 9 – 11

The Dwarf Bottlebrush unashamedly boasts puffy flowers between its densely packed leaves that some describe as fireworks. In most cases, the flowers appear during the spring and summer. However, you may find them in the fall under the right conditions.

Dwarf Bottlebrushes hold up well during droughts, and they need little fertilizer. Mites and root rot are among the biggest issues these trees face, although they’re resistant to most other pests and diseases.

Dwarf English Laurel

Prunus laurocerasus
Dwarf English Laurel is as attractive in summer as in winter, thanks to its evergreen, dense and glossy foliage.
Scientific Name: Prunus laurocerasus
  • Plant Type: Evergreen shrub
  • Geographic Origin:
  • Plant Size: 6 – 8 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Partial to full sun
  • Plant Zone: 7- 9

Thanks to its glossy, deep green leaves, the Dwarf English Laurel is a beauty both when it’s in and out of bloom. Blooms happen during the spring, and you’ll enjoy seeing and smelling white, fragrant flowers.

Once upon a time, people used to extract cyanide from Dwarf English Laurels. So, this shrub shouldn’t make it to your dinner plate. It’s slow-growing but worth the wait, given that it serves as a privacy screen, windbreaker, and hedge.

Dwarf Flowering Almond

Prunus triloba
Dwarf Flowering Almond is an unusually beautiful shrub or small tree up to 5 feet high.
Scientific Name: Prunus triloba
  • Plant Type: Deciduous shrub
  • Geographic Origin: China, Japan
  • Plant Size: 4 – 5 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Partial to full sun
  • Plant Zone: 4 – 8

We know what’s running through your mind, so we’ll answer first; no, Dwarf Flowering Almonds don’t produce edible nuts. However, this shrub is worth including in your landscaping, given that they have stunning double pink flowers that bloom in April.

Dwarf Flowering Almond shrubs are fragile, so you need to take care when planting or transplanting them. They’re drought tolerant once they establish themselves, but they get a little too comfy with their growth, so pruning is crucial to keep an attractive shape.

Elderberry

Sambucus canadensis
Elderberry blooms in July with cream flowers that are collected in large shields-umbrellas, and have a pleasant aroma.
Scientific Name: Sambucus canadensis
  • Plant Type: Deciduous shrub
  • Geographic Origin: North America
  • Plant Size: 5 – 12 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Partial to full sun
  • Plant Zone: 3 – 9

Elderberry is likely one of the flowering shrubs on this list that you instantly recognize, given that people use its dark purple berries in wine, dye, and jelly. However, don’t eat unripe fruits or any other part of the plant, as they’re lethal if you eat enough of them.

The versatile Elderberry can thrive in soils ranging from wet to dry. They prefer full sun when their five-petal flowers thrive, helping them produce the fruit that so many people enjoy cultivating.

Euonymus

Euonymus fortunei
Great for dry conditions, Euonymus does not like excessive moisture in the soil.
Scientific Name: Euonymus fortunei
  • Plant Type: Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: China
  • Plant Size: 4 – 70 feet
  • Sun Exposure: Partial to full sun
  • Plant Zone: 4 – 9

You need to know what you want out of Euonymus before planting it, for if you plant it near something it can climb, this shrub will take on a vine-like life. However, this plant’s large, glossy leaves with lighter green veins are a popular choice to plant in gardens.

When the Euonymus flowers, it produces four petals with a greenish-yellow color. Admittedly, they don’t stand out as much as some of the other flowers on this list. Nevertheless, this plant is a favorite among people looking for a low-maintenance flowering shrub option.

Evergreen Sumac

Rhus virens
Evergreen Sumac is a shrub or small tree with a rounded form and spreading branches.
Scientific Name: Rhus virens
  • Plant Type: Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Mexico, Southwest United States
  • Plant Size: 12 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Partial to full sun
  • Plant Zone: 8 – 10

The Evergreen Sumac’s glossy leaves give it a tropical appearance, and the tiny pink flowers that emerge from the tips of its stems in the early spring add to its beauty. In the fall, red fruit with fine hairs emerge.

It’s best to keep the Evergreen Sumac pruned to prevent it from taking on a tree-like shape. The good news is that it’s resistant to disease, insects, and drought.

Flowering Currant

Ribes sanguineum
The status of an ornamental leader among relatives of the Flowering Currant ensured its flowering.
Scientific Name: Ribes sanguineum
  • Plant Type: Deciduous shrub
  • Geographic Origin: United States, Canada
  • Plant Size: 3 – 10 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Partial to full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 8

The flowering Currant is unique because its leaves and flowers emerge almost simultaneously. The flowers themselves grow on hanging racemes stems containing 5 – 30 flowers. You can choose from a red or pink variety.

After flowering, the Currant makes way for a dark purple berry. Although it won’t harm you, it has an unpleasant taste. The Flowering Currant enjoys cooler climates and moist soil. However, it can usually hold up well during a drought.

Flowering Quince

Chaenomeles speciosa
Flowering Quince is a low-growing thorny shrub, with spectacularly changing color leaves.
Scientific Name: Chaenomeles speciosa
  • Plant Type: Deciduous shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Asia
  • Plant Size: 6 – 10 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 4 – 9

Flowering Quince is an excellent shrub to use for hedges when you want to enjoy colorful flowers early in the season. In some cases, this bush blossoms with red flowers, pink, or white, in the mid-winter. Hybrid varieties exist, so you can also choose flowers with multiple colors.

Adaptability is at the forefront of Flowering Quince’s features. It can grow in nearly any soil condition, from dry dirt to clay. You also won’t have to worry about deer and rabbits eating it.

Forsythia

Forsythia
Forsythia is a small tree or shrub of the Olive family, blooming in early spring with bright yellow flowers.
Scientific Name: Forsythia spp.
  • Plant Type: Deciduous shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Asia
  • Plant Size: 2 – 10 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Partial to full sun
  • Plant Zone: 5 – 8

Forsythias belong to the olive family. Although you won’t be able to eat this delicious fruit from Forsythias, this shrub’s brilliant yellow flowers make them worth planting. The flowers grow on long, arching branches and bloom in the early spring.

The fast-growing Forsythia can hold up well during mild droughts and in acidic and alkaline soil. The biggest downside to this shrub is its upkeep, given that you’ll need to trim its branches frequently for it to maintain an attractive shape.

Fringe Flower

Loropetalum Chinense
Fringe Flower is an evergreen shrub from the Hamamelidaceae family.
Scientific Name: Loropetalum Chinense
  • Plant Type: Evergreen shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Asia
  • Plant Size: 12 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Partial to full sun
  • Plant Zone: 7 – 10

Fringe Flower is a stunning shrub in the witch hazel family that grows dense clusters of spider-like flowers, given its long, narrow petals. Unlike many evergreens, most Fringe Flower varieties come with purplish-red leaves.

You can count on Fringe Flowers blooming in the early spring. However, if they have nutrient-rich, well-draining soil, they might bloom again throughout the growing season.

Fuchsia

Fuchsia magellanica
Fuchsia has flexible branches, covered with green or slightly purple, small, serrated, oval-lanceolate leaves, flowering is plentiful with the milky, scarlet, lilac, crimson or dark blue flowers.
Scientific Name: Fuchsia magellanica
  • Plant Type: Annual shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Caribbean, South America
  • Plant Size: 1 – 2 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Partial shade
  • Plant Zone: 10 – 11

Fuchsia shrubs produce show-stopping flowers that dangle downwards from their stems. Depending on the variety, its flowers may have a single or double layer, often with two-tone colors. Fuchsias are one of the best flowering bushes on this list if you want to plant shrubs in a partially shaded area.

Hummingbirds frequently visit Fuchsia shrubs, and you should plant them in soil with a neutral to acidic pH. However, one of the most significant characteristics preventing Fuchsias from being a good fit for gardens is that they can’t handle temperatures below 50 degrees Fahrenheit.

Gardenia

Gardenia jasminoides
Gardenia is an evergreen shrub that grows to a height of up to 2 m under natural conditions.
Scientific Name: Gardenia jasminoides
  • Plant Type: Flowering bush
  • Geographic Origin: China, Japan, Taiwan
  • Plant Size: 5 – 6 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Partial shade
  • Plant Zone: 8 – 11

Gardenia is a shrub beloved for its fragrant flowers and medicinal properties. It also produces a yellow fruit that people in East Asia used to turn into a dye. Their bloom time varies depending on the type of Gardenia you purchase, offering you the flexibility to choose from early to late summer blooms.

Here’s the bad news: Gardenias are picky plants. They require acidic soil between 5.0 – 6.0 and a balance of sun and shade. You should also ensure they have rich, well-draining soil.

Hardy Hibiscus

Hibiscus moscheutos
Hardy Hibiscus – an incredibly beautiful perennial shrub, which is highly valued by flower growers for its impressive appearance and long flowering.
Scientific Name: Hibiscus moscheutos
  • Plant Type: Perennial bush
  • Geographic Origin: North America
  • Plant Size: 3 – 7 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 5 – 9

If you want to plant shrubs in a wetland area, the Hardy Hibiscus is excellent. You can find them boasting their large colorful flowers in moisture-rich places in the wild. By growing them at home, you can choose among several colors ranging from white to rose.

Hardy Hibiscus tolerates hot, humid weather well. You should ensure it has organic-rich soil with excellent air circulation to encourage the best blooms. But overall, this is an easy-to-care-for plant.

Honeysuckle

Tecoma capensis
Honeysuckle is ideal for attracting wildlife to your garden, as many birds, including hummingbirds, feed on its delicious nectar.
Scientific Name: Tecoma capensis
  • Plant Type: Evergreen shrub
  • Geographic Origin: South Africa
  • Plant Size: 3 – 10 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Partial to full sun
  • Plant Zone: 9 – 11

Honeysuckle gets the “honey” in its name from its brilliant orange, yellow, and red hues. It flowers from the fall to spring, and its nectar is a favorite among hummingbirds.

You can expect it to take well to any soil condition as long as you offer your Honeysuckle well-draining soil. Once this shrub establishes its roots, it can hold well in drought conditions. The Honeysuckle is a vigorous grower, so it usually isn’t necessary to fertilize it.

Hydrangea

Hydrangea paniculata
The color of the Hydrangea petals at the beginning of flowering is white, then they turn pink, and towards the end, greenish tones appear in their range.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea paniculata
  • Plant Type: Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Asia
  • Plant Size: 8 – 15 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Partial to full sun
  • Plant Zone: 3 – 8

If you’re on the market for flowering bushes with large, showy flowers, the hydrangea’s 7-inch long cone-shaped panicles will do the trick. They’re also a joy to watch, starting as white flowers in the late summer and changing to a tan or brown color as winter approaches.

Hydrangea’s sweeping, flowery branches can be fun for kids to play with, but make sure little ones don’t pop a flower in their mouths, as this shrub is toxic. Ideally, the hydrangea needs loamy, well-draining soil. Panicle hydrangeas are also well known to live in full sun conditions, compared to other varieties that need shade.

Indian Hawthorn

Rhaphiolepis indica
Indian Hawthorn is quite shade-tolerant but blooms only in sufficiently bright light.
Scientific Name: Rhaphiolepis indica
  • Plant Type: Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Asia
  • Plant Size: 4 – 6 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 8 – 10

The warm weather-loving Indian Hawthorn shrub is excellent for growing as a hedge. It produces fragrant and beautiful light pink to white flowers in the spring, their five-petals clustering at the tips of the shrub’s steams. Attractive dark blue berries replace the flowers.

Loose soil is crucial for the Indian Hawthorn to prevent disease and root rot. They aren’t fast growers, so you can get away with pruning them once a year. An annual dose of fertilizer is also sufficient for them.

Japanese Dogwood

Cornus kousa
Japanese Dogwood is highly resistant to various diseases and harmful insects.
Scientific Name: Cornus kousa
  • Plant Type: Multi-stemmed shrub
  • Geographic Origin: China, Korea, Japan
  • Plant Size: 15 – 30 feet high
  • Sun Exposure: Partial to full sun
  • Plant Zone: 5 – 8

The Japanese Dogwood will steal anyone’s attention that passes by your yard. Its “flowers” are bracts, which form a star-shaped flower with unique leaves, appearing like a flower. You can purchase Japanese Dogwoods in various pink, red, and white shades.

This shrub produces beautiful edible berries in the fall, which people use for wine and jelly. The downside to the Japanese Dogwood is that it requires a decent amount of maintenance, needing frequent water and cleaning up after its berries drop.

Japanese Rose

Kerria japonica
Japanese Rose is a deciduous shrub, has a very showy flower shape resembling a golden ball
Scientific Name: Kerria japonica
  • Plant Type: Deciduous shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Asia
  • Plant Size: 5 – 10 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Partial to full shade
  • Plant Zone: 4 – 9

Japanese Roses are shrubs that produce showy single or double flowers. Unlike most species in the Rosaceae family, the Japanese variety blooms well in partial or full shade. You can expect the flowers to always have a rich yellowish-gold color and the bark greenish-yellow hue.

The fast-growing Japanese Rose likes moist, loamy soil that drains well. It tolerates most soil pH levels well, but dense soil will spark root rot.

Korean Spice Viburnum

Viburnum carlesii
Korean Spice Viburnum offers beautiful blooms in early spring. Its deciduous leaves are green and serrated
Scientific Name: Viburnum carlesii
  • Plant Type: Deciduous shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Korean, Japan
  • Plant Size: 6 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Partial to full sun
  • Plant Zone: 4 – 7

The Korean Spice Viburnum is yet another flowering shrub on this list that produces aromatic flowers. In the spring, pink buds give way to white flowers with touches of their pink beginning. These small tubular flowers cluster together, forming a ball on their stem.

Korean Spice Viburnums are an excellent option if you’re looking for an easy maintenance plant. Average soil quality is plenty for them, and they only need weekly watering when there isn’t enough rain.

Lavatera

Lavatera maritima
Lavatera flowering begins in June and continues until the second half of the autumn period.
Scientific Name: Lavatera maritima
  • Plant Type: Semi-evergreen shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Western Mediterranean
  • Plant Size: 6 – 8 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 8

Lavatera is an excellent shrub to add gentle color to your garden without being super flashy. Its funnel-shaped flowers range from pale lavender to purple, and they sit on thin stems.

The downside is that Lavatera has a short lifespan, living up to five years. It’ll need sandy or loamy soil of nearly any pH level during this time. Due to its irregular growth, it makes an excellent shrub screen or garden backdrop.

Mahonia

Mahonia spp.
For Mahonia planting, you should choose a well-lit area that has reliable protection from strong gusts of wind.
Scientific Name: Mahonia spp.
  • Plant Type: Evergreen shrub
  • Geographic Origin: North America, Central America, Asia
  • Plant Size: 3 – 10 feet
  • Sun Exposure: Partial shade
  • Plant Zone: 5 – 9

Mahonia shrubs produce double buttercup-like flowers that grow in thick clusters at the end of their stems. The result is a breathtaking yellow show that happens from January to April. Tart but edible berries then replace them, and you can even eat this shrub’s flower petals.

You can prune your Mahonia shrub to help it grow more dense foliage. However, this plant holds its shape well compared to other bushes on this list. We recommend mulching it in the summer to help retain moisture and prevent weeds.

Meadowsweet

Spiraea alba
Meadowsweet is a profusely flowering shrub with a height of a meter that has paniculate inflorescences with pink or white flowers.
Scientific Name: Spiraea alba
  • Plant Type: Perennial shrub
  • Geographic Origin: North America
  • Plant Size: 3 – 6 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Shade to full sun
  • Plant Zone: 3 – 7

When Meadowsweet is in full bloom, it’s hard to tell it has leaves, given that it flowers from the base to the tips of its stems. The flowers are tiny, but they sit closely together, arranging themselves in a cone shape.

Meadowsweet grows best in moist or wet conditions and attracts a range of butterflies and birds. It’s common to see this shrub in the wild growing along swamps and water-filled meadows, but they also make for beautiful hedges.

Mountain Laurel

Kalmia latifolia
For Mountain Laurel, a semi-shady area of ​​the garden closed to direct sunlight and cold drafts will be an excellent place.
Scientific Name: Kalmia latifolia
  • Plant Type: Evergreen shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Eastern North America
  • Plant Size: 5 – 15 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Partial sun
  • Plant Zone: 4 – 9

Mountain Laurel grows purple-marked flowers with rose, white, or pink backdrops. The flowers have a short lifespan, from late May to early June. However, it has glossy leaves and knobby stems that make it a stunning shrub in your yard year-round.

You should plant Mountain Laurels in an area away from wind and soil with an acidic pH. To help maintain the soil’s acidity, place wood chips or evergreen bark mulch on top of it.

Ninebark

Physocarpus opulifolius
Ninebark shrub consists of drooping branches that form a lush spherical crown.
Scientific Name: Physocarpus opulifolius
  • Plant Type: Deciduous shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Central and Eastern North America
  • Plant Size: 5 – 10 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Partial to full sun
  • Plant Zone: 2 – 8

The Ninebark produces white or pink flowers in the late spring. By the time the late summer rolls around, you’ll still get to enjoy color via its red fruit. If you live on sloping land or want to plant shrubs for erosion prevention, planting Ninebark in steeper landscapes is an excellent option.

Although Ninebark is a fast grower, it doesn’t get the unruly, sprawling appearance of many bushes. Therefore, it typically only needs pruning to clear away old woody growth.

Philadelphus

Philadelphus
The main attraction of Philadelphus is the beautiful spring flowering.
Scientific Name: Philadelphus
  • Plant Type: Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Europe
  • Plant Size: 10 – 12 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Partial to full sun
  • Plant Zone: 4 – 8

Philadelphus goes by “Mock Orange” because of its fragrant flowers that are easy to mistake for orange blossoms. The flowers have four petals in a gently cupped-shaped form with yellow centers. You’ll get to enjoy these flowers from spring to summer.

You should plant Philadelphus in Loamy soil and ensure it receives plenty of water and good drainage. When you’re not using it as a hedge or for landscaping, you can cut its flowers, as they’re long-lasting in a vase.

Privet

Ligustrum spp.
Privet is a shrub that is fairly easy to propagate from branch cuttings.
Scientific Name: Ligustrum spp.
  • Plant Type: Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Africa, Asia, Europe
  • Plant Size: 4 – 15 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Partial to full sun
  • Plant Zone: 3 – 8

Privet shrubs give privacy hedges a whole new meaning, given that they have dense foliage. Furthermore, they have small flowers that bloom in the early summer. As a word of warning, these flowers have a strong, off-putting smell, so we recommend planting them away from your house.

Once your Privet shrub’s roots take hold, it can thrive in many different growing conditions. Nevertheless, you should aim to keep a neutral soil pH and ensure water can drain well.

Purple Flowering Raspberry

Rubus odoratus
Purple Flowering Raspberry is one of the most decorative types of raspberries with large sweet and sour berries.
Scientific Name: Rubus odoratus
  • Plant Type: Perennial shrub
  • Geographic Origin: North America
  • Plant Size: 6 – 12 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: North America
  • Plant Zone: Full shade to full sun

The Purple Flowering Raspberry is an excellent shrub to plant if you want to enjoy both beautiful flowers and a food source. As you likely guessed, it produces purple flowers, and blooms happen from June to August.

Flowers then give way to blackberries. Although these blackberries aren’t as sweet as other blackberries, birds and humans can eat them. The Purple Flowering Raspberry is a hardy plant, but it prefers medium to moist, well-draining soil.

Pyracantha

Pyracantha coccinea
Pyracantha berries attract birds, and flowers densely covering the bush attract bees.
Scientific Name: Pyracantha coccinea
  • Plant Type: Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Asia, Europe
  • Plant Size: 6 – 15 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Partial to full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 9

Pyracantha is among the flowering bushes that produce berries as beautiful as its flowers. In the spring, tiny white flowers emerge. By the time fall comes around, the petals drop, and pretty red berries appear, lasting through the winter.

You’ll need to take care with thorns when handling Pyracantha, given that it’s part of the rose family. Ideally, you should plant this shrub in sandy soil. Keep it away from trellises if you want it to maintain a shrub shape.

Rhododendron

Rhododendron macrophyllum
Rhododendron is a large, upright branching, evergreen shrub that has large leaves and large trusses of flowers
Scientific Name: Rhododendron macrophyllum
  • Plant Type: Perennial or evergreen shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Canada, United States
  • Plant Size: 12 – 25 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Partial to full sun
  • Plant Zone: 4 – 8

Rhododendron is among the most popular shrubs in climates where it grows, given that they’re winter bloomers, with their flowers lasting to early summer. They come in many colors, and when in bloom, they sit above the leaves, hiding much of their greenery.

You can plant Rhododendrons in the fall or spring if you use them as a perennial shrub. They’re a reasonably hardy plant, although they must have acid soil to thrive.

Rock Rose

Cistus monspeliensis
Rock Rose is an evergreen shrub of the genus Cistus from the Mediterranean and Canary Islands, grown for attractive, cup-shaped flowers.
Scientific Name: Cistus monspeliensis
  • Plant Type: Evergreen shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Europe, Northern Africa
  • Plant Size: 3 – 5 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 8 – 11

Whether you don’t have a green thumb or the time to invest in caring for shrubs, the Rock Rose is an excellent choice. It has tough-as-nails properties, holding up well against strong winds, salt spray, and drought.

In the late spring and early summer, this plant produces papery, crinkled petals that range from pink, rose, yellow, and white colors with an orange center. The sad part is the Rock Rose’s flowers only last one day, but they flower consistently during its blooming season.

Rosemary

Salvia rosmarinus
Rosemary is an evergreen perennial shrub with needle-like leaves similar to coniferous needles.
Scientific Name: Salvia rosmarinus
  • Plant Type: Evergreen shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Mediterranean
  • Plant Size: 2 – 6 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 8 – 10

We haven’t talked a lot about blue flowers, so Rosemary is an excellent choice if you’re looking for a shrub that produces tiny blue buds. And, yes, this is the same Rosemary herb that you can use for seasoning dishes.

There’s little you need to do to care for Rosemary once you plant it, aside from keeping it trimmed. Rosemary is an excellent spreader, making it a bit of a nuisance for people unable to put in the time to care for it.

Rose of Sharon

Hibiscus syriacus
Rose of Sharon is an ornamental shrub that will delight you with its flowering from spring to autumn.
Scientific Name: Hibiscus syriacus
  • Plant Type: Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Asia
  • Plant Size: 8 – 12 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Partial to full sun
  • Plant Zone: 5 – 8

Rose of Sharon is in the Hibiscus family, meaning that you’ll get to enjoy large, showy, tropical-looking flowers on this shrub. Its five-petal flowers bloom from summer to fall, and you can choose from many colors to compliment your yard.

As long as you plant Rose of Sharon in a suitable USDA zone, it’ll grow in just about any soil condition, including that with low nutrients. It’s proficient at self-seeding, so prepare to remove its seedlings if you don’t want this shrub spreading.

Shrub Rose

Rosa spp.
Almost all Shrub Rose varieties are very fragrant and have a bright and unique smell.
Scientific Name: Rosa spp.
  • Plant Type: Deciduous shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Asia, Europe, North America
  • Plant Size: 6 inches – 20 feet
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 2 – 11

Over 100 species of roses exist, many of which have shrubby features. In addition to the near-endless flower color varieties you have to choose from, Shrub Roses can be as high or low maintenance as you’d like. However, the more you maintain them, the richer their blooms will be.

Unlike other rose species, the Shrub Rose springs back from winter weather better and has a higher tolerance for mildew. It requires loamy, well-draining soil.

Smoke Bush

Continus coggygria
Growing in the south, Smoke Bush may bloom several times during the summer season.
Scientific Name: Cotinus coggygria
  • Plant Type: Deciduous shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Southern Europe to Central China
  • Plant Size: 10 – 15 feet high
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 4 – 9

Smoke Bush flowers look less like flowers and more like massive puffs of pollen that cling tightly to their stems. These plumes have a purple-pink color, and some varieties have purple instead of green leaves. These leaves change to an orange or yellow color in the fall.

If you have children or pets, it’s best to plant Smoke Bush out of reach, given that it produces a toxic sap. Furthermore, you should place it in an area where it’ll have some protection against wind.

Spirea

Spirea japonica
Spirea is species of ornamental shrubs of the Pink family, naturally growing in China and Japan.
Scientific Name: Spirea japonica
  • Plant Type: Perennial shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Europe, North America
  • Plant Size: 1 – 20 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 4 – 8

Spirea offers a unique set of tightly packed small flower clusters that look beautiful as blossoms and in-bloom. Their pink and whitish flowers provide a lovely compliment to pair with other shrubs on this list, although they also come in different colors.

We recommend planting Spirea in loam and well-draining soil. It grows best in neutral soil pH levels and doesn’t require lots of water.

Strawberry Tree

Arbutus unedo
Strawberry Tree is an interesting plant that pleases with unusual fruits, can be an ornament of an evergreen garden, and become the property of a fruit planting.
Scientific Name: Arbutus unedo
  • Plant Type: Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Southwestern Europe
  • Plant Size: 8 – 12 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Partial to full sun
  • Plant Zone: 7 – 10

The Strawberry Tree is a unique shrub for two reasons—it has cup-shaped petals that circle up so steeply that they look like round balls and produce a beautiful spikey red fruit. You can eat the fruit, which has a touch of sweetness.

The twisting Strawberry Tree is a statement shrub in landscaped areas. It needs average to acidic soil and a moderate amount of watering.

Summersweet

Clethra alnifolia
Summersweet flowering begins in the last summer or first autumn weeks.
Scientific Name: Clethra alnifolia
  • Plant Type: Deciduous shrub
  • Geographic Origin: United States
  • Plant Size: 3 – 8 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Partial to full sun
  • Plant Zone: 3 – 9

People commonly call Summersweet a “pepper bush” because of its blossoms that appear like pepper. You’ll enjoy this plant’s pinkish-white blooms in July or August. Come the fall, its dark green leaves transition to a yellowish-orange color.

Summersweet makes for an excellent neutralizing shrub. It’s also a fantastic option for attracting butterflies, hummingbirds, and bees to your garden. If you live by the ocean, you won’t worry about salt spray affecting it.

Sweetshrub

Calycanthus occidentalis
Sweetshrub is a California native shrub that grows in canyons, tolerates sand, clay, no drainage and seasonal flooding.
Scientific Name: Calycanthus occidentalis
  • Plant Type: Deciduous shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Southwestern United States
  • Plant Size: 6 – 12 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Partial to full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 9

There’s nothing like the fruity scent of Sweetshrub to turn heads when someone walks by this shrub in your yard. Its reddish-maroon flowers are the reason for its strong fragrance, as they have a smell that ranges between strawberry, pineapple, and banana, depending on the variety.

To enjoy the Sweetshrub’s blooms from May to July, plant this shrub in acidic, well-draining soil. It requires nutrient-dense dirt with a loamy texture.

Vanhoutte Spirea

Spiraea x Vanhouttei
Vanhoutte Spirea is a flowering deciduous shrub plant from the Rosaceae family, which has a high decorative effect, frost resistance, a long flowering period and unpretentiousness in cultivation and care.
Scientific Name: Spiraea x Vanhouttei
  • Plant Type: Deciduous shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Canada, China, United States
  • Plant Size: 8 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 3 – 8

Vanhoutte Spirea gets its nickname “Bridalwreath” because its white flowers that turn this shrub into a puffy plant make it perfect for a spring wedding backdrop. Once the leaves drop, you’ll be able to enjoy the shrub’s bluish-green leaves that turn to purple in the fall.

Unfortunately, Vanhoutte Spirea can fall victim to several diseases and pests if you don’t give it proper care. So, plant it in well-draining soil with a medium amount of moisture.

Viburnum

Viburnum spp.
Viburnum is a spring flowering shrub, it decorates gardens and terraces in the most beautiful way.
Scientific Name: Viburnum spp.
  • Plant Type: Shrub
  • Geographic Origin: North America
  • Plant Size: 3 – 20 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Partial to full sun
  • Plant Zone: 2 – 9

Viburnum shrubs have a long bloom time, from early spring through the end of June. During those months, flat-topped or snowball-like flowers form on the ends of its stems, according to the variety you choose. Its foliage also varies, ranging from smooth to velvety or rough.

Make sure to map out where you want to plant your Viburnum shrub, as it won’t transplant well once it takes root. Luckily for those adverse to pruning, this shrub doesn’t need much pruning maintenance.

Weigela

Weigela florida
At the beginning of summer, the Weigela bush is completely covered with red, pink, cream, white or yellow bell-flowers.
Scientific Name: Weigela florida
  • Plant Type: Deciduous shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Asia
  • Plant Size: 6 – 10 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 4 – 8

Calling all hummingbird and butterfly lovers! The Weigela shrub is a magnet for these creatures, as it boasts small, tubular flowers packed with nectar. The flowers grow individually along the shrub’s stems, with leaf accents emerging.

Plant it in acidic, moist soil to encourage Weigela to have a full bloom in the early summer. It grows thick foliage, making for an excellent privacy hedge.

White Oakleaf Hydrangea

Hydrangea quercifolia
White Oakleaf Hydrangea is a light-loving plant but also prefers partial shade. In very shaded areas, the crown stretches, thins and blooms worse.
Scientific Name: Hydrangea quercifolia
  • Plant Type: Deciduous shrub
  • Geographic Origin: Southeastern United States
  • Plant Size: 4 – 8 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Partial to full sun
  • Plant Zone: 5 – 9

If you’re looking for flowering bushes that have a good tolerance to dryer conditions, the White Oakleaf Hydrangea is an excellent option. Despite the word “white” in its name, this shrub also comes in pink flower varieties. Furthermore, you can choose between single or double petals.

White Oakleaf Hydrangeas are hardier than many other hydrangea varieties. We recommend pruning this shrub every summer so that you can cut away old wood without nipping off any live stems.

Winter Jasmine

Jasminum nudiflorum
Winter Jasmine blooms in winter and until spring with small flowers, 1-2 cm in diameter, bright yellow color, emitting a pleasant aroma.
Scientific Name: Jasminum nudiflorum
  • Plant Type: Deciduous shrub
  • Geographic Origin: China
  • Plant Size: 4 – 15 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Partial to full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 10

Winter Jasmine doesn’t have the fragrance of other Jasmine flower varieties, but its gorgeous yellow flowers make up for it. Blooms take place in the late winter. In fact, its flowers emerge before its leaves.

Mealybugs and aphids sometimes plague Winter Jasmine. So, you can help this shrub build resistance to such situations by occasionally applying insecticidal soap. They grow in many soil conditions, including chalk, sand, and clay.

Witch Hazel

Hamamelis virginiana
Witch Hazel blooms from late September – early October until the onset of cold weather.
Scientific Name: Hamamelis virginiana
  • Plant Type: Perennial shrub
  • Geographic Origin: North America
  • Plant Size: 10 – 20 feet tall
  • Sun Exposure: Partial to full sun
  • Plant Zone: 3 – 9

Yes, the Witch Hazel plant is the same ingredient in pharmaceutical medicine and is one of the only legal non-prescription American plants. But growing Witch Hazel as a shrub in your yard is an excellent way to add color during the fall and winter. Its spidery-like flowers come in yellow, and its leaves turn a yellowish-orange in the fall.

Unlike many plants, Witch Hazel’s fruit and flowers show up simultaneously. It grows best in loamy or silt soil with plenty of nutrients, although it’s not picky about soil pH.

Final Thoughts

There are many different flowering bushes and shrubs to fit a range of growing needs, flower colors and styles, and maintenance requirements. When choosing an area to plant your shrubs, we recommend seeking out places with partial or full sunlight, as this is a requirement for most of these plants. If you have any doubts about your soil quality, your local garden center will be able to equip you with the tools to test it.

So, we’ll leave it in your hands now. With so many options to choose from, we imagine you have a list of shrubs that you’re interested in introducing to your property.

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Short Perennials

Plants

61 Low Growing Perennial Plants For Garden Edges and Borders

Are you thinking of adding some shorter perennial plants to your garden edges or borders? In this article, we examine 61 of our favorite perennial plants that are smaller in stature. These plants will return year after year, and give your garden a great look with the foliage that's closer to the ground.

Flowering Vines

Plants

25 Best Flowering Vines For Your Home and Garden Space

Trying to decide which flowering vine is the perfect fit for your home garden space? Picking the right flowering vine can make all the difference when it comes to the look and feel of your garden. In this article, we take a look at our favorite vines that produce flowers, with the names and pictures of each of them!

Hosta Companion Plants

Plants

27 Hosta Companion Plants For Shady Garden Areas

Hostas are extremely versatile plants, and can add some lovely ground cover to your yard or garden. But what plants grow best with them in the garden? Which ones look the best together? In this article, certified master gardener and hosta enthusiast Laura Elsner examines the best companion plants for hostas in your garden.