Daisy Varieties: 34 Different Types of Beautiful Daisies

Thinking of adding some daisies to your home garden or flower patch this season? There are many different types of daisy varieties, so picking the right one can be a bit of a challenge! After all, who wouldn't love to plant them all? In this article, we look at our favorite daisy varieties that you can add to your garden this season, with names and pictures of each!

daisy varieties

Daisies are one of the most popular perennial flowers planted in garden beds and in pots around the world. These low maintenance flowers come in a variety of different colors, and are quite easy to grow. There are over 20,000 different daisy varieties, providing plenty of options for just about every gardener.

Daisies are considered “tender perennials” which means they are typically treated as annual flowers, because they aren’t hardy for winter. Daisies don’t like frost, but will return year after year in the proper hardiness zones, once planted and if properly cared for.

With so many different daisy varieities, how do you know which one is the best fit for your garden? Fear not, dear gardener, we have you covered! Keep on reading to check out our favorite daisy varieties and determine which of these beautiful flowers will look great in your home, garden, or greenhouse!

Annual Townsend Daisy

Townsendia Annua
Annual Townsend Daisy is a species of annual herb in the family Asteraceae, is one of the taller of this generally low-growing genus.
Townsendia Annua
  • Plant Type: Annual
  • Geographic Origin: Texas
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun
  • Plant Size: 6 inches tall
  • Plant Zone: USDA 3-9

This is a taller member of the Townsendia genus, which are typically shorter and low-growing plants.

It has narrow leaves that can grow up to an inch long, and its growing season is from April to September. These leaves are typically short and have a dark green color that grows mostly along the plant’s stems.

You can find occurrences of Annual Townsend Daisies in the four corners area of west and south Texas. They can grow in various desert conditions, including up in the mountains.

The flowerheads have white florets that start as pink buds and several yellow disc florets.

Barberton Daisy

Gerbera jamesonii
For normal development and growth, the Barberton Daisy needs high humidity.
Gerbera jamesonii
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: South Africa
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Sun
  • Plant Size: 2-3 feet
  • Plant Zone: USDA 8-11

The Barberton daisy is a popular flower worldwide because of its striking contrast coloring that fades from white to orange to red when flowering.

It has an average need for water, but it is pretty versatile in terms of the water it can consume. It can take any water or soil pH and grows and blooms throughout the year.

To get the most color out of a Barberton daisy, you will want to provide a medium moisture environment that is nutrient-rich and well-drained. It also prefers to be grown in chalk, sand, or loam soil types.

Blue-Eyed African Daisy

Arctotis grandis
Blue-Eyed African Daisy flowers belong to one of the brightest representatives of garden plants. Along with luxurious-looking dense greenery, they have magnificent buds.
Arctotis grandis
  • Plant Type: Perrenial
  • Geographic Origin: South Africa
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun
  • Plant Size: 2 feet tall
  • Plant Zone: USDA 8a-11

This daisy gets its name from its distinct eye in the center of the flower that is grey to bright blue surrounded by a yellow ring in a white flower.

This color scheme makes it look like the flowers are pairs of blue eyes sticking out of the ground. These flower buds close up during later times of the day or cloudy weather but respond to warmth and light by opening fully.

They are not equipped to survive harsh winters but can cope with dry conditions and less than ideal soil.

Blushing Daisy

Gerbera viridifolia
Blushing Daisy is a stemless perennial herb with lavender flowers that appear very early in spring.
Gerbera viridifolia
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: South Africa
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun
  • Plant Size: 1-2 feet tall
  • Plant Zone: USDA Zone 8-11

This daisy is a hybrid version of the Gerbera family that produces a beautiful mauve purple flower and a dark center.

It is stemless and grows lots of brown roots that are somewhat throng-like. This daisy attracts honeybees and is found in stony soil or grasslands in South Africa.

The blushing daisy can even be found on mountain slopes and damp areas where it enjoys growing in medium or high rainfall conditions.

It flowers during springtime but will sporadically throughout the year. It grows best in full sun conditions where it can grow uninterrupted during the day.

Botterblom Marigold Daisy

Arctotis arctotoides
Botterblom Marigold Daisy is a fast-growing plant with butter-yellow daisy flowers. Its leaves extract does have anti-bacterial properties.
Arctotis arctotoides
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Namibia, Lesotho, and South Africa
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun
  • Plant Size: 1 Foot
  • Plant Zone: USDA Zone 9

This fast-growing daisy comes from South Africa and is composed of light green stems and leaves that give way to a cheerful yellow daisy flower that flowers nearly year-round.

It has a purplish-brown underside of its petals, and the flowers buds close on cloudy days or when the sun is not shining as brightly.

Botterblom Marigold Daisy is a very hardy plant, and its colors can last for several days when picked as a vase flower. It takes around a month to grow tiny brown seeds that drop to the ground.

These seeds are happy in most soil types, including clay and sand.

Cape Daisy

Arctotis fastuosa
Cape Daisy prefers fertile, well-drained soil, and blooms almost all summer and fall.
Arctotis fastuosa
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: South Africa and Namibia
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun
  • Plant Size: Between 1 and 3 feet tall
  • Plant Zone: USDA Zone 4-11

This daisy is also known as the Monarch of the Veldt or the Zulu Prince daisy.

It has become known for attracting pollinating insects like bees due to its nectar and pollen-rich flowers. It doesn’t attract birds or butterflies, but it does attract a variety of beneficial insects in addition to bees.

Cape daisies have a tender hardiness, meaning it does not do well in cold temperatures. Its flowers open and respond to sunlight and warmth and make for great front flowers for patio displays.

They range in color from white to bright red and are quite vibrant.

Cream African Daisy

Arctotis stoechadifolia
Cream African Daisy is resistant to heat, short-term drought and slight frost.
Arctotis stoechadifolia
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: South Africa
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun
  • Plant Size: 1 foot
  • Plant Zone: USDA 8a-11

This flower was first described in the scientific literature in 1767 by Peter Jonas Bergius as growing in the dunes and under dry conditions.

It has wooly hairs that are grey or green and gets its name from the white and creamy flowers that bloom during spring and summer times.

Each of the showy flowers has a steel blue eye complemented by a surrounding yellow ring that gives it a striking appearance.

Desert Star Daisy

Monoptilon bellidiforme
Desert Star Daisy, commonly known as Mojave Desertstar, is a small, mounded annual forb in the sunflower family.
Monoptilon bellidiforme
  • Plant Type: Annual
  • Geographic Origin: Southwest United States
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun
  • Plant Size: 0.2 inches
  • Plant Zone: USDA Zone 9-10

Also known as the small desert star, this daisy is an annual plant native to the southwestern deserts of the United States.

It forms from a taproot and starts growing flat on the ground, with yellow or green stems. Desert star daisy has small green leaves and is an overall tiny plant, never growing to be more than a centimeter in length.

It can be white or rose-tinged, with a yellow center and a blue tint. It has solitary flower heads produced in ray and disk floret varieties.

Dwarf Townsend Daisy

Townsendia minima
Dwarf Townsend Daisy is a bush up to 2 inches tall with branched stems and small white flowers.
Townsendia minima
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Utah
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun
  • Plant Size: 1-2 inches
  • Plant Zone: USDA 3-9

This plant is commonly observed from the beginning of April through the 2nd week of August in its native Utah. It is often found in forests, but it can also thrive in rocky soil and grasslands.

Lesser sightings are observed in disturbed land, cliffs, and brushy vegetative soil.

It flowers with many petals that range from white to indigo or pink tint. When these petals bloom, the ray petals range from 8 to 21 on average.

The native growing environment is restricted to a small area known as Bryce Canyon in southwest Utah. It gets its name from its small size due to its growing environment of exposed cliffs.

Easter Daisy

Townsendia incana
Easter Daisy has two forms. There is a compact form with a slightly domed cushion of silver leaves and almost stemless white flowers, and a less compact form with the same flowers but on smaller stems.
Townsendia incana
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Nevada and Wyoming
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun
  • Plant Size: 1-5 inches
  • Plant Zone: USDA 3-9

The Easter Daisy is a low-growing perennial and produces several bent short stems.

These daisies like open and exposed locations with rocky or sand soils. They have relatively large flowerheads for their sides, though the rosette holding the flower head is generally wider.

They have a somewhat dense amount of white hair lying against the surface of their leaves and sport reddish-brown stems.

It is winter hardy when planted in USDA zone 6-9, meaning it can survive well during winter months provided it gets proper nutrition and rainfall. It can survive in temperatures as low as -10F.

English Daisy

Bellis perennis
English Daisy is a very hardy plant that easily adapts to the conditions that exist in different places.
Bellis perennis
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: South Africa
  • Sun Exposure: Shade to Light Sun
  • Plant Size: 6-12 inches
  • Plant Zone: USDA Zone 4-8

This daisy is the classic daisy design that many people think of when the word daisy is heard. The English Daisy is also known as the lawn daisy because of how often it is seen growing on lawns.

This flower enjoys shady conditions and cooler weather between April and June during outdoor growing. These daisies can propagate so quickly that in the United States, many people consider them like weeds and can be a nuisance to other plants.

It flowers in a wide range of colors, including blue, white, pink, and red.

One unique thing about the flowers that sets them apart from other daisies is that the outer petals have a purplish highlight color that makes them stand out.

Gloriosa Daisy

Rudbeckia hirta
Gloriosa Daisy has tubular purplish-gray flowers and yellow reed flowers with a convex receptacle.
Rudbeckia hirta
  • Plant Type:
  • Geographic Origin: North America
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun
  • Plant Size: 1-3 feet
  • Plant Zone: USDA Zone 3-7

The Gloriosa Daisy is a summer and fall flowering daisy with a brilliant yellow flower and a dark brown pistol.

It is also known as a black-eyed Susan, getting this nickname to its pistil’s darker presentation. It can turn from a dark purple shade to a deep burgundy color which appears black from a distance.

This flower reseeds very enthusiastically, so it is easy to keep growing year after year in the wild or in the garden.

The seeds propagate at 70 degrees Fahrenheit, so you want to ensure that they can grow during these temperatures. The Gloriosa Daisy is also drought-tolerant, but it will still appreciate regular watering.

Golden Marguerite Daisy

Anthemis tinctorial
Golden Marguerite Daisy is a biennial plant and is drought tolerant as it is native to the Mediterranean.
Anthemis tinctorial
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Europe and Asia
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Light shade
  • Plant Size: 1-3 feet
  • Plant Zone: USDA Zone 3-7

The Golden Marguerite Daisy is native to many places in Europe and West Asia but has also been naturalized in North America.

People view this daisy as the “bread and butter” of perennial gardens because of how much of a popular staple it is.

It owes much of its popularity to its attractive golden-yellow flowers that contrast nicely with its tendency to have deep green stems and leaves. It is an eye-catching daisy.

These daisies are evergreen in mild climates and are very pleasant to smell because they emit a pleasant herb fragrance that smells like chamomile.

The Golden Marguerite likes a full sun environment in dry to medium soil like its yellow color.

These flowers can tolerate poor soils and dry conditions, but you will lose a lot of the luster it gets in the color of its flowers if you don’t supply it with proper flowering conditions.

Grass-Leaved Daisy

Leucanthemum graminifolium
Grass-Leaved Daisy is a clump-forming, herbaceous perennial, native to France, with dark green basal leaves and white flower heads that bloom in summer.
Leucanthemum graminifolium
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: France
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade
  • Plant Size: 1 foot
  • Plant Zone: USDA 6-9

As its name suggests, the grass-leaved daisy has stems and leaves that are dark green and grass colored.

Like most daisies, it is a low-maintenance plant and is highly recommended for beginner gardeners.

The grass-leaved daisy has dark green basal leaves supported by wiry stems. It produces white flower heads with a bright yellow pistol during the summer.

It can be targeted by Aphids and leaf eelworms, so take precautions when planting this daisy to ensure that the flower is encouraged to continue flowering.

This flower will require multiple prunings during its growing season because it can produce dead heads regularly that will need to be trimmed to encourage multiple flowerings.

Hooker’s Townsend Daisy

Townsendia hookeri
When grown in a pot, Hooker’s Townsend Daisy requires little moisture in winter.
Townsendia hookeri
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: North America
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun
  • Plant Size: Under 6 inches
  • Plant Zone: USDA Zone 3-9

Part of the collection of Townsendia flowering plants known as easter daisies, the Hooker’s Townsend Daisy is native to North America and is mainly seen in the Rocky Mountain corridor.

It has grown natively in Idaho, Wyoming, North Dakota, South Dakota, Colorado, Nebraska, Utah, and many others, including Canadian provinces like Yukon, British Columbia, and Alberta.

Its habitat primarily consists of growing on slopes and gravel exposures. It particularly enjoys growing in road cuts and other ground disturbances.

It is notable for its hairy strigose and linear leaves and its ability to produce stemless flowers in a cream and light pink color.

Jone’s Townsend-daisy

Townsendia jonesii
Jone’s Townsend-daisy is a very rare species, that grows in the southwestern districts of Utah and also in the state of Nevada.
Townsendia jonesii
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: the Western United States and Canada
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun
  • Plant Size: 2 inches tall
  • Plant Zone: USDA 3-9

The Jone’s Townsend-daisy has stems that live in sparsely vegetated soil. These daisies prefer grasslands, sagebrush steppes, woodlands, and dry forests.

They can also be seen in valleys and sometimes but rarely in alpine environments.

They are seen in a swath of areas across the western United States, including Nevada, Utah, Oregon, Arizona, and Wyoming. The North-Western parts of Canada are also home to this daisy variety natively.

They produce flower rays in blue or violet colors, and their disk corollas can get up to 0.2 inches long. They typically bloom in a white color during April, May, and June.

Karoo Marigold Daisy

Arctotis venusta
Karoo Marigold Daisy has white petals with a grayish-blue underside and a core surrounded by a yellow circle. The flowering period is from April to October.
Arctotis venusta
  • Plant Type: Summer Annual
  • Geographic Origin: Karoo and other parts of South Africa
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun
  • Plant Size: 1-2 feet tall
  • Plant Zone: USDA Zone 8a-11b

This daisy grows in drier summer conditions with a moderate amount of rainfall. It takes root in disturbed areas like sandy or rocky soil and roadsides.

Europeans started cultivating the flower in their botanical gardens about a hundred years ago. They found it easy to cultivate and grow large flowers which resulted in many hybrid species of Arctotis venusta being produced.

Bees are the primary pollinator of this daisy variety. It is a popular daisy choice among gardeners in Europe, America, and Africa who propagate the plants themselves.

Last Chance Townsend Daisy

Townsendia aprica
Last Chance Townsend Daisy is about 1 inch tall with tiny rosettes of gray leaves and almost stemless yellow flowers. This species is included in the list of plants that are threatened with extinction.
Townsendia aprica
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Utah
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun
  • Plant Size: 0.5 – 1 inch
  • Plant Zone: USDA 6

This plant is a rare daisy species variety that is currently threatened and in danger of dying out. It is a stemless daisy, and its leaves and flowers come out at ground level.

It is quite a small flower that hand orangish-yellow ray florets. Since it is endangered, its only native population is thought to be a small area in Utah. Coal mining operations disturbed its natural habitat as it would often grow over coal seams.

There have only been 15 known occurrences of this daisy and only about 6000 total plants discovered in the wild.

Mohave Desert Star Daisy

Monoptilon bellioides
Mohave Desert Star Daisy is an annual small low herb that is native to California, with flower heads of white rays surrounding a yellow central disk.
Monoptilon bellioides
  • Plant Type: Annual
  • Geographic Origin: Southern California and Western Arizona
  • Sun Exposure: Sun to Partial Shade
  • Plant Size: 0.4 inches tall
  • Plant Zone: USDA Zone 9-10

This daisy loves dandy or gravel-covered desert flats and prefers to bloom in the first half of the year.

It is a small plant with white ray flower heads that sometimes have a reddish tint.

It does well with winter desert rain and will bloom in the spring if it can absorb enough water. They grow in a way that obscures the surface of the ground and are considered wildflowers.

Even if they don’t get enough water, they are adapted to drought and are considered drought tolerant. Mohave Desert Stars make a great flower candidate for xeriscaping, a planting style used with little or no irrigation.

Namaqua Marigold Daisy

Arctotis hirsuta
Namaqua Marigold Daisy flowers are orange, yellow and white tones, formed from spring to mid-summer.
Arctotis hirsuta
  • Plant Type: Annual
  • Geographic Origin: South African Western Cape and Northern Cape
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun
  • Plant Size: 1-2 feet tall
  • Plant Zone: USDA Zone 8

This African daisy is known for attracting birds with its bright yellow and orange flower color. It also owes this bird attracting factor to its size and life cycle as an annual spring flower.

The seeds of the Namaqua Marigold are very lightweight, which helps disperse them far through the wind. They are often found in the wild on sandy flats and slopes near coasts and capes.

By the time summer arrives, it already has seeds buried in the ground, waiting for favorable conditions. It is pretty adaptable to summer temperatures for this reason.

Oxeye Daisy

Leucanthemum vulgare
Despite the fact that Oxeye Daisy is very similar to ordinary chamomile, from a botanical point of view, these are different plants.
Leucanthemum vulgare
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Europe
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade
  • Plant Size: 1-3 feet
  • Plant Zone: USDA Zone 3-8

The Ox-Eye Daisy is a free-flowering plant that blooms for four weeks, from the later part of spring until the middle of summer. It used to be known under the scientific name Chrysanthemum leucanthemum but was later reclassified to represent its taxonomy better.

It likes a full sun environment and growing in dry to medium soil habitats. This daisy has superior resistance to crop diseases and can thrive in a wide variety of different environments.

It can also tolerate deer, rabbits, drought conditions, and salt. Butterflies are most drawn to this flower which helps contribute to this flower being low maintenance.

Painted Daisy

Tanacetum coccineum
Painted Daisy has tubular flowers that are painted in white, red and all shades of pink. Flowering occurs in May and June.
Tanacetum coccineum
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Asia
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun
  • Plant Size: 2-3 feet
  • Plant Zone: USDA Zone 3-7

The Painted Daisy is capable of flowering in vibrant colors for weeks at a time in a garden or wild setting. It has a rifle of petals surrounding its dense pistil center, which is typical of daisies.

These daisies get their name for the watercolor and painterly shade of colors that they flower. You may see magenta, white, red, and yellow Painted Daisies that blossom brilliantly and vibrantly in the summer or fall.

They are a favorite flower of butterflies and make great additions to butterfly gardens, though be aware that the leave sap of painted daisies is toxic to humans and some of their pets.

They don’t require complicated upkeep work and won’t spread too aggressively in a garden setting.

Parry’s Townsend Daisy

Townsendia parryi
Parry’s Townsend Daisy has purple flowers on stems up to 12 inches all.
Townsendia parryi
  • Plant Type: Biennial
  • Geographic Origin: California
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun
  • Plant Size: 10-12 inches long
  • Plant Zone: USDA 4-7

Native to California, the Parry’s Townsend Daisy has spread far to cover other places in North America and can be found on different continents as well.

It has fleshy and hairy leaves and produces flowers with lavender florets and yellow disk florets.

As a California native flower, it has a high tolerance for low water conditions. It does well during light conditions and wants total sun exposure, which means at least 6 hours of continuous, direct sunlight every day.

You will want to avoid shade spots with this daisy as it needs direct sunlight to bloom in early summer conditions.

Portuguese Daisy

Leucanthemum lacustre
Portuguese Daisy is an easy-care ornamental flower for the home garden.
Leucanthemum lacustre
  • Plant Type: Perrenial
  • Geographic Origin: Portugal
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun
  • Plant Size: 1-3 feet
  • Plant Zone: USDA 4-9

This daisy is only found natively growing in Portugal but is popular throughout the rest of the world.

It stands between 1 and 3 feet tall, can grow in various conditions, and is a generally low-maintenance flower that can thrive in less than ideal conditions.

It produces a white flower with a golden-yellow pistil, much like the rest of the Leucanthemum tribe that it is a part of.

Aside from making an excellent addition to any flower garden, people often use Portuguese Daisies in cocktail recipes which is a dark red drink that people partake in during the holidays.

Purple Coneflower

Echinacea purpurea
Liliput Daisy is very widely used in non-traditional and official medicine, as well as in ornamental gardening.
Echinacea purpurea
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin:
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Part Shade
  • Plant Size:15-18 inches tall
  • Plant Zone: USDA Zone 3-8

The lilliput daisy has a unique look thanks to its rose-pink florets and reddish eye color that gives it a very color coordinated and appealing look.

It blooms during the summer months of June and August and is popular among gardeners who like to show flowers.

It is easy to grow and low maintenance, and attracts birds, butterflies, and other helpful insects.

The Liliput daisy can tolerate a vast number of soil types, including dry, clay, and shallow-rocky soil. This tolerance also extends to drought, humidity, and poor soil.

When growing this flower, you should divide clumps to reduce overcrowding and remove spent flowers to keep their appearances.

Renoster Marigold Daisy

Arctotis acaulis
Renoster Marigold Daisy – this species is a perennial and has a strong taproot.
Arctotis acaulis
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Cape Provinces in South Africa
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun
  • Plant Size:½ – 1 foot tall
  • Plant Zone: USDA Zone 9

The Renoster Marigold is a part of the daisy family that is stemless. The name acaulis in Greek means “without a stem” in English.

In ancient times the grey felt that grows underneath its leaves was scraped from the flower and used as a way to help start fires.

It is an easy-to-grow plant that is also fast growing. It likes a sunny position without too much water and plenty of space.

Cutting off old flower heads is a way to increase the flowering time. It is a very showy daisy, thanks to this long flowering time and the range of bright colors it comes in.

Rothrock’s Townsend Daisy

Townsendia rothrockii
Rothrock’s Townsend Daisy has huge, pale lilac, daisy-like flowers on arcuate stems 3 inches tall, almost cupped.
Townsendia rothrockii
  • Plant Type: Perrenial
  • Geographic Origin: Colorado
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun
  • Plant Size: 2-3 inches
  • Plant Zone: USDA 6-9

This plant is a rare alpine Daisy that lives in snow-melt areas in colorado.

It has short stems for the size of the flower that they have to support and grows nicely in a rock garden. It needs good water drainage to grow efficiently.

Planting the seeds during the winter gives you the best chances to benefit from a cold spell that will break their tendency to stay dormant and get a headstart on early spring growing.

They are hardy and can survive cold temperatures but are currently vulnerable due to warmer climates and more motorized recreation in the area trampling them.

Shasta Daisy

Leucanthemum x superbum
Shasta Daisy has numerous snow-white flowers with delicate thin petals that are a fantastic sight.
Leucanthemum x superbum
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: California
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun
  • Plant Size: 1-3 feet
  • Plant Zone: USDA Zone 4-10

This breed of daisy was created by crossing the best characteristics of an oxeye daisy, Portuguese daisy, and English daisy.

It is attractive to butterflies, and they are thankful for their help with pollination. It can also resist influence from deer and rabbits as well as drought.

These qualities were bred into the Shasta Daisy to help make it low maintenance and easily cared for addition to any home garden.

It produces white flowers that also have gold to butter yellow eyes. It got its name from the white snow of Mount Shasta in California, where it was conceived.

Showy Townsend Daisy

Townsendia florifer
Showy Townsend Daisy has stems up to 6 inches tall, which are crowned with white to bright pink flowers.
Townsendia florifer
  • Plant Type: Annual
  • Geographic Origin: Western United States
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun
  • Plant Size: 6 inches tall
  • Plant Zone: USDA 3-9

This daisy has flowers that bloom in white and pink colors during June, but it grows during the months of April, May, June, July, and August.

It is commonly found in the wild in Idaho, Montana, Oregon, Utah, Wyoming, and across the rest of the Western United States.

The Showy Townsend Daisy likes dry and open spaces in the plains and foothills. It is often seen growing with sagebrush.

The flower produces one to multiple ascending stems that measure 2-6 inches in height and are covered in short hairs. It makes a hairy fruit called achene that has stiff straight bristles.

Southern Daisy

Bellis sylvestris
Most Bellis are cold intolerant, but perennials can tolerate temperatures as low as -7ºC.
Bellis sylvestris
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Central and Southern Europe
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun
  • Plant Size: 1-2 feet
  • Plant Zone: USDA Zone 5-10

The southern daisy lives in meadows and clear woods, commonly in Mediterranean regions. It possesses roots that creep through the soil, securing nutrients and producing leaves in a dark green hue.

Its leaves are spoon-shaped, and when it flowers during the autumn season, it produces a fruit called an achene.

The southern daisy has more oversized heads and petals than other members of its Bellis genus. The leaves, petals, and flower buds are all edible and have a sour taste.

People use the extract of these flowers as a skin tonic that can treat cuts and scrapes and lighten freckles.

Sunrise Daisy

Echinacea paradoxa
Sunrise Daisy is a beautiful plant that reach a height of up to 2 meters, and which has large yellow flowers that attract many beneficial insects.
Echinacea paradoxa
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: North America
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Light Shade
  • Plant Size: 2-3 inches
  • Plant Zone: USDA Zone 3-9

The sunrise daisy is a bright yellow flower that gets its name to its resemblance to the early morning sun. The center of the flower starts out green but eventually turns into a nice gold color.

It blooms during nearly the entire summer and loves the full sunlight but can tolerate light shade conditions when necessary.

It is a beautiful flower to hummingbirds, butterflies, and birds because of its long-lasting bloom period and tolerance to many adverse conditions.

The sunrise flower can thrive in dry and clay soil and rocky soil under drought conditions.

Swan River Daisy

Brachyscome iberidifolia
Swan River Daisy is a graceful, highly branched, usually annual plant with purple or blue reed flowers that bloom from June to October.
Brachyscome iberidifolia
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Australia
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun
  • Plant Size: 1 to 3 feet
  • Plant Zone: USDA Zone 9-11

The swan river daisy is a beautiful flower with foliage that grows in gray-green. The flower colors it can produce include lavender, blue, yellow, and white.

Its flowering season is from the middle of the summer to the end of fall, and to get the most color out of your flowers, you will want to grow them in moist and organic-rich soil.

It can be grown quickly thanks to its low-maintenance growing conditions that make it easy for beginner gardeners to get breathtaking and vibrant flowers.

The Swan River Daisy can grow in challenging conditions like sandy or clay soil or cliff and rocky outcroppings.

Wyoming Townsend Daisy

Townsendia alpigena
Wyoming Townsend Daisy has a colorful range of flower shades from white to pink, dark purple, or light blue.
Townsendia alpigena
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Western United States
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun
  • Plant Size: 6 inches
  • Plant Zone: USDA Zone 3-9

Part of the genus is named after David Townsend, an amateur Pennsylvanian plant scientist, and botanist from the 1700s.

It likes to grow on steep slopes and just outside of thick forests in alpine conditions.

The Wyoming Townsend Daisy stands at 6 inches tall and produces many bright and beautiful colors, including bright yellows and deep purples.

It has been used by the native Navajo people of the Wyoming region as diuretics, and the leaves are made into tea to treat coughs and colds.

The seeds can also be pressed into baking oil that is used for baking or is fed to livestock like cattle, sheep, or pigs.

Rough Burr-Daisy

Calotis scabiosifolia
Commonly known as the Rough Burr-Daisy, is the upright perennial to 18 inches high with striking purple/mauve or white color flowers.
Calotis scabiosifolia
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Australia
  • Sun Exposure: Full Sun to Partial Shade
  • Plant Size: 12-18 inches
  • Plant Zone: USDA 4-8

This daisy is hairy and grows with creeping stems, commonly seen in Queensland, Victoria, and eastern Australia. It flowers throughout most of the year, but you will primarily see flowering done in the spring.

Rough-burr daisy has sharp-toothed basal and stem leaves and produces fruit that has burrs on them. It prefers to grow in woodland or grassland habitats, but it can thrive without too much trouble in other environments.

It does the best growing in heavy clay soils. Full sun exposure does wonders to bring out the white or mauve flowering colors, but it can do okay in the shade.

Final Thoughts

As you have seen, there are so many colors and varieties of daises to choose from, each one widely ranging in color and size. Gardners love them for their bright colors and how generally easy they are to grow, and admirers of daisies see these flowers as symbolizing innocence and purity.

These flowers may seem simple to some, but that is precisely what makes them so wholesome. They are easy to grow, and make a welcome addition to just about any garden, regardless of color or theme.

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