Dahlia Varieties: 64 Different Types of Dahlia Cultivars

Dahlias are some of the most beautiful perennial flowers you can add to your garden. But which types of dahlias should you add this season? While the flower lover in me says add "all of them," there simply just isn't enough room to do that. There are thousands of dahlia cultivars you can plant, so we've selected some of our favorites to show you how beautiful these flowers can be!

White Dahlia With Pink Variety

Dahlias are a beloved flower among gardeners because of their versatility. They come in many colors, shapes, designs, and sizes, totaling into the hundreds in terms of their variety. So, unless you’re savvy in horticulture, it’s easy to not recognize certain flowers that belong to the Dahlia hybrida species.

Examples of some of the many types of Dahlias that we’ll be covering here include:

  • Cactus
  • Semi-cactus
  • Pompon
  • Anemone
  • Collarette

Some Dahlias have a single ring of petals, while others have double flowers. All Dahlias have origins in Mexico, Central America, and South America. However, some modern varieties have roots in regions that don’t traditionally grow these plants.

Despite the many Dahlia varieties, these flowers share the same preference for sandy, well-drained soil and full sun that lasts 6 – 8 hours per day.

If you live in warmer climates (USDA zones 8 – 11), you can cut your Dahlias at the end of each season and wait for them to grow the following year. Otherwise, you’ll need to remove your Dahlia bulbs and store them inside during the winter to keep them in their naturally perennial state.

Without further ado, let’s explore some of the best Dahlias that you can consider growing this season. Between 42 species and hundreds of dahlia hybrids, the plants below serve as a taste of the many options available.

A La Mode

A La Mode
The A La Mode produces orange flowers with white tips, and need a regular supply of fresh air.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘A La Mode’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Central and South America, Mexico
  • Plant Size: 5’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

A La Mode Dahlias produce stunning orange and peach flowers with white tips that span up to six inches. They excel growing in containers and garden beds alike. If you have lots of deer, you won’t have to worry about them eating these Dahlias.

To encourage root growth and promote drought resistance, aim to water A La Mode Dahlias every 2 – 3 days once you see them sprouting. Then, they’ll need periodic watering during their growing season.

Alfred Grille

Alfred Grille
The Alfred Grille has double large flowers of pink-orange color with a yellow center.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Alfred Grille’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Central and South America, Mexico
  • Plant Size: 3’ – 4’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

From July until the first frost, you’ll get to enjoy the Alfred Grille Dahlia’s brilliant salmon-pink flowers with a bright yellow center. These plants are showy, as they have long, thin petals that resemble a sea anemone.

An attractive feature of the Alfred Grille Dahlia is that the flowers remain perched straight on the stem, even in heavy rain. So, you won’t have to worry about them drooping. Furthermore, they have an excellent vase life while serving as a great border plant.

American Dream

American Dream
The American Dream prefers well-lit areas with loose fertile soils.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘American Dream’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Central and South America, Mexico
  • Plant Size: 3’ – 4’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

The American Dream is yet another head-turning Dahlia variety. It boasts massive double flowers that can span as much as ten inches in width. They’re always pink, and you’ll be able to admire their raspberry stripes if you get close enough.

If you love showing flowers, growing American Dream Dahlias are an excellent choice, given that they’re notorious for winning awards. When growing these Dahlias, keep them protected from wind and their soil moist.

April Dawn

April Dawn
This April Dawn Dahlia flower of amazing color will take its rightful place in any garden collection.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘April Dawn’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Central and South America, Mexico
  • Plant Size: 4’ – 6’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

April Dawn Dahlias fall under the “decorative” category, as they have a double flower that often contains attractive wavy petals. In some cases, the petals have a formal appearance with an even petal distribution, and other times the petals have a more informal arrangement.

As with most Dahlias, the April Dawn variety is toxic to several animals, including dogs, cats, and horses. We recommend planting them in groups of five to give your garden a color pop.

Arabian Night

Arabian Night
Arabian Night Dahlia has become the result of selection and differs from other numerous varieties in a rich wine-red hue of inflorescences.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Arabian Night’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Holland
  • Plant Size: 36” – 40”
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

Arabian Night Dahlias have a rich red color that’s so deep that it almost looks like it turns black near the center. These plants are excellent bloomers, producing 4-inch wide flowers starting in June, often with inward curving petals.

If you live in a hot climate, it’s okay to offer Arabian Night Dahlias light shade. However, they thrive in full sun. Like most Dahlias, this species will produce even more flowers if you cut the dead ones.

Arlequin Decorative

Arlequin Decorative
Arlequin Decorative Dahlia is one of the most spectacular and long-blooming flowers that are grown in the garden.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Arlequin Decorative’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Central and South America, Mexico
  • Plant Size: 36” – 48”
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

The hybrid Arlequin Decorative Dahlia became registered in 1951. Since then, it’s become a popular favorite among gardeners, who gush over its 6 – 8 inch flowers. The petals range from a yellowish-red to a deep variegated red.

Arlequin Decorative Dahlias grow best in soil with a pH between 6.1 – 7.5. You can easily propagate these plants by dividing their rhizomes, bulbs, or tubers from stem cuttings, and they grow well as an annual or perennial.

Aurora’s Kiss

Aurora’s Kiss
Aurora’s Kiss Dahlia flowering is quite long, which lasts from mid-summer until the first autumn frosts.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Aurora’s Kiss’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Canada
  • Plant Size: 4’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

Aurora’s Kiss is one of the Dahlia varieties that fall under the “Ball” category because of its round, pom-pom-like shape. It has short petals that curve inwards, forming an almost honeycomb look when you stare at it from above.

The Aurora’s Kiss flowers come in a deep red color, and they flower from midsummer to autumn. We recommend using a fertilizer with potash to encourage this plant to bud regularly. Deadheading old flowers are also helpful.

Autumn Sunburst

Autumn Sunburst
Autumn Sunburst Dahlia is an ornamental variety of a perennial plant, which is perfect for group plantings.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Autumn Sunburst’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Mexico, Colombia, Central America, United States
  • Plant Size: 3’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

Autumn Sunburst Dahlias get their name for having beautiful orange and red petals that fade into pale yellow tips. The flowers have a full appearance between being double flowers and having a ruffled texture that makes them look more voluminous.

These plants thrive if you plant them in the late spring. You can then expect their 8 – 10-inch flowers to remain in bloom from mid-summer to the first frost.

Bishop of Llandaff

Bishop of Llandaff
Bishop of Llandaff Dahlia is quite hardy species of dahlia, can tolerate partial shade, and blooms from July to October
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Bishop of Llandaff’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Mexican central plateau and highlands
  • Plant Size: 34” – 38”
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun or partial shade
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

The Bishop of Llandaff Dahlia produces a brilliant red flower atop deep purplish-green stems. Although the petals are a solid color, they have thin yellow pieces that frame a dark center. Unlike many Dahlias, the Bishop of Llandaff is hardy enough to tolerate partial shade, although it’s best to plant them in full sun.

You should aim to plant these Dahlias 1.5 – 2 feet apart to ensure they have plenty of room to grow and bloom, which occurs from July to October.

Blithe Spirit

Blithe Spirit
This beautiful flower has a red center, with white tips.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Blithe Spirit’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Holland
  • Plant Size: 2’ – 3’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

The Blithe Spirit Dahlia resembles an exotic tropical plant with solid, bright red petals that have a generous amount of brilliant white tips. These decorative plants had their start in 1962 and have lovely rich green foliage.

You should plant Blithe Spirit Dahlias in neutral to mildly acidic soil. Since these are sterile plants, you’ll need to propagate them by removing their rhizomes or tubers from stem cuttings.

Boogie Woogie

Boogie Woogie
Boogie Woogie Dahlia is unpretentious in care, when the basic recommendations are followed, she will delight with good growth and lush buds.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Boogie Woogie’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Central and South America, Mexico
  • Plant Size: 36” – 40”
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

The Boogie Woogie Dahlia falls under the “anemone” variety of Dahlias because their flowers look like sea anemones. Boogie Woogies have a bright pinkish-purple underlayer of petals. The Petals then transform to yellow, with hints of light pink throughout, forming a beautiful blend that some people call a skirt-like look.

Boogie Woogies require only average soil quality to grow. It’s best to plant them in the spring so that they have time to flower for the summer.

Checkers

Checkers
To stimulate the growth of Checkers Dahlias, it is recommended to regularly fertilize and prune old flowers.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Checkers’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Mexico, Colombia, Central America
  • Plant Size: 3.5’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

The decorative Checkers Dahlia has a round shape and a color pattern resembling a checkers board. It always has red and white colors, with some varieties having red petals with small white tips and others with more white.

In either case, Checkers Dahlias will turn heads if you plant them in your garden or use them as cut flowers in your home. We recommend using a potash-dense fertilizer and deadheading old flowers regularly to encourage new flower growth.

Chimborazo

Chimborazo
Suitable soil for Chimborazo Dahlia planting should be well-drained, well-drained and high in nutrients.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Chimborazo’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Central and South America, Mexico
  • Plant Size: 4’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

Chimborazo Dahlias fall under the collarette category, and they have an almost Lilly-like shape. The first layer of petals has a dark red color and lay mostly flat away from the yellow center. A second white and red-streaked layer then emerges upwards, cradling it.

You should ensure your Chimborazo Dahlias have access to adequate water and well-draining soil, as these can be tender plants. They also grow best if you plant them facing the south or west.

Cornel

Cornel
Cornel Dahlia – the shape of the flower is very similar to the ball. the petals are half-length folded into a tube.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Cornel’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Holland
  • Plant Size: 4’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

Cornel Dahlias make for an attractive fall wedding bouquet, as their flowers have a scarlet red to deep peachy color and form symmetrical round balls. Unlike many of the Dahlia varieties we’ve discussed, Cornel Dahlias produce flowers with a maximum 3.5-inch diameter.

However, they grow in beautiful clusters, making your garden or border appear full. Since Cornel Dahlias are relatively late bloomers, they’re an excellent flower to plant if you’d like some color around your yard later in the season.

David Howard

David Howard
In order for the dahlia plants to get sick less, experienced flower growers advise planting them in a new area every year.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘David Howard’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Holland
  • Plant Size: 30” – 40”
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

Calling all lovers of the color orange! The David Howard Dahlia boasts peachy orange downward-facing petals that form a puffy ball-like appearance, turning to a dark orangish-red in its center. These flowers sit atop dark purple-green foliage, making their color even more prominent.

To make a unique flower arrangement in your home, cut the stem of your David Howard Dahlias close to the flower. Then, place them in a wide tray with some water and let them float around as a table center.

Doris Day

Doris Day
The dahlia flower hates drafts but requires a well-ventilated and lighted place.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Doris Day’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Holland
  • Plant Size: 3.5’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

The Doris Day is a cactus variety of Dahlia that produces soft but spikey-looking pink and red petals. It has dozens of these petals, which splay outward and slightly upward, forming gaps that make a circular appearance.

If you live in a cooler climate, remove your Doris Day tubers after the first frost. Then, keep them in a cool, dry place before planting them in a pot in March and outdoors at the end of May.

Dutch Explosion

Dutch Explosion
Dutch Explosion Dahlia is a magnificent large-flowered cactus variety. The petals have a special shape, they are folded into a tube, and the tip is pointed, so the flower looks special.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Dutch Explosion’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Central and South America, Mexico
  • Plant Size: 3 – 4’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

Yet another cactus Dahlia, the Dutch Explosion, looks like an explosion of pink and white colors. Its ornate petals are long and splay out theatrically from the flower’s yellow-ish center. You can expect its flowers to grow 4 – 6 inches in diameter.

We recommend planting Dutch Explosion Dahlias in groups of at least five. That way, it’ll make up for the relatively smaller flower diameter, helping to bring even more color to your garden. Despite the spiny appearance of this plant, it has a velvety feel, so you don’t have to worry about it injuring pets or children.

Edinburgh

Edinburgh
Edinburgh Dahlia is a heat-loving plant, so it is better to choose a sunny place for planting.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Edinburgh’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: United Kingdom
  • Plant Size: 36” – 48”
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

The aptly named Edinburgh Dahlia originates from the United Kingdom, where botanists created this decorative Dahlia variety to have a full flower appearance. It has a deep purplish-red color that starts at the base of each petal which transforms into pinkish-white tips.

Edinburg Dahlias produce 10-inch flower heads that will continually bloom throughout the season if you cut away old flowers.

Franz Kafka

Franz Kafka
Franz Kafka Dahlia likes moist soils without stagnant water.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Franz Kafka’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Holland
  • Plant Size: 2’ – 3’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

The pompom appearance of Franz Kafka Dahlias will delight cheerleaders and nature lovers alike. These three-inch round flowers have a honeycomb appearance, boasting dozens of small upward cupped petals.

Franz Kafka Dahlias have a dandelion-like appearance because they sit atop tall stems with dark green leaves at their base. However, no one would dare call this plant a weed, for it has an alluring decorative nature.

Frigoulet

Frigoulet
For planting Frigoulet Dahlia, it is not recommended to use the soil on which asters or flowers susceptible to fungal diseases were previously grown.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Frigoulet’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Central and South America, Mexico
  • Plant Size: 4’ – 5’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

“Striking” is a word that many people say when they see the Frigoulet Dahlia for the first time. It has long, narrow tube-like petals that start out a deep red at the base and taper out into streaky white and red tips. These flowers sit on dark brownish-red stems, giving them an even more unique look.

You’ll need to ensure you keep Frigoulet Dahlias well-watered and plant them away from areas that receive strong wind. Their tubers store best in temperatures between 45 – 70 degrees Fahrenheit.

Garden Show

Garden Show
Garden Show Dahlia has pale pink petals with glowing red markings and a large yellow center.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Garden Show’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Central and South America, Mexico
  • Plant Size: 2’ – 3’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

The Garden Show Dahlia is just what it sounds like—its flowers will truly steal people’s attention. These classy flowers have a base of white and red-streaked petals. Then, as the petals get close to the center, they change to a peachy orange color and take on a rippled texture.

Despite how delicate they look, these are hardy plants. So, you don’t have to worry about heavy rains making the flowers droop. Like so many Dahlias, you’ll want to keep Garden Show Dahlias out of your pets’ mouths, as they have toxic parts.

Gerrie Hoek

Gerrie Hoek
Gerrie Hoek Dahlia flowers are fully double, the petals are pink, and a yellow tint is visible inside the inflorescence.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Gerrie Hoek’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: The Netherlands
  • Plant Size: 4’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

Gerrie Hoek is the type of Dahlia you’ll want to bring to a girl’s baby shower. Its flowers boast a beautiful soft pink color with hints of yellow around its center. The blooms themselves span up to six inches.

We recommend planting Gerrie Hoek in the spring, ensuring you cover the bulbs with two inches of well-fertilized soil. Although these flowers have a water lily look, they only need moderate amounts of water and well-draining soil.

Happy Single First Love

Happy Single First Love
Happy Single First Love Dahlia is an upright plant, branched, with strong stems.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Happy Single First Love’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Central and South America, Mexico
  • Plant Size: 2’ – 3’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

The Happy Single First Love Dahlia produces single flowers with peachy orange petals. Additionally, a ring of bright red frames its brown and yellow center. So, although it doesn’t appear as full as many other varieties of Dahlias, the Happy Single Love Dahlia showers gardens with color.

You’ll get to enjoy the 4-inch flowers on the Dahlia against a backdrop of deep green foliage with a purple hue. Because these are relatively lower-growing plants, they’re an excellent fit for balconies and garden beds.

Henriette

Henriette
Henriette Dahlias can be planted outside only after warm weather has set in and the soil has warmed up sufficiently.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Henriette’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Vermont
  • Plant Size: 3’ – 4’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

The Henriette is a semi-cactus Dahlia with a subtle but beautiful soft salmon pink color. Its intricate petals form narrow, downward-facing tubes with petals that curve upward. The result is a full-looking flower show, with each flower growing up to six inches.

You can expect Henriette Dahlias to bloom starting in July. Kids will have fun playing with their petals, which roll out, unraveling to be two-thirds larger than their apparent width.

Holland Festival

Holland Festival
Holland Festival Dahlia develops well on fertile soils, and tolerates sandy ones, but the wetlands do not allow them to reveal themselves in all their glory.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Holland Festival’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Central and South America, Mexico
  • Plant Size: 3’ – 4’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

Holland Festival Dahlias are one of the Dahlia varieties with a pinwheel-like appearance because they grow vertical on their stem. Because of their massive flowerheads, people informally classify them as dinner plate-style flowers.

As with most Dahlias, the Holland Festival blooms from July to October. You can increase the chances of getting more blooms during this time by removing withering flowers. We’re sure you’ll love the paper-like and delicate appearance of their petals.

Honka Surprise

Honka Surprise
A layer of mulch on the surface of the soil will protect against slugs and excessive rapid drying of the soil, and will also help get rid of the need for weeding and loosening the soil.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Honka Surprise’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Central and South America, Mexico
  • Plant Size: 2’ – 3’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

It’s easy to overlook the Honka Surprise as being part of the Dahlia family, given that they only have a single layer of eight petals that spread away from their yellow center, leaving lots of gaps.

These plants fall under the orchid Dahlia category, and they have involuted florets that can extend to at least two-thirds of their length. Since the deep pink and white flowers only grow up to four inches in diameter, we recommend planting many Honka Suprise plants to boost your garden’s color.

Jan Van Schaffelaar

Jan Van Schaffelaar
Jan Van Schaffelaar Dahlia is a pompom dahlia variety with deep pink dense flowers.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Jan Van Schaffelaar’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Central and South America, Mexico
  • Plant Size: 2’ – 3’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

The Jan Van Schaffelaar Dahlia is a mouthful to say, but it’s worth seeking out this species if you’re looking for round, pink button-like flowers. Some people lovingly call this plant a lollipop, for their 2 – 3-inch flowers that raise from a straight stem above its leaves appear this way.

In botanical terms, Jan Van Schaffelaar are a pompon Dahlia. That means its flowers have a spiral arrangement, and they have double blooms. You should keep these plants well-watered, as they don’t tolerate drought.

Jomanda

Jomanda
Jomanda Dahlia produces beautiful salmon-colored flowers.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Jomanda’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: The Netherlands
  • Plant Size: 3’ – 4’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

Jomanda is part of the ball Dahlia variety. They produce round, symmetrical salmon-colored flowers. The color is nearly solid, except the salmon lightens around the petal frames. These summer bloomers make excellent medium-sized borders.

If you’re trying to figure out what to pair Jomanda Dahlias with, I recommend flowers that contain deep reds or purples. They pair beautifully with other Dahlia varieties in these colors.

Karma Bon Bini

Karma Bon Bini
Karma Bon Bini Dahlia produces inflorescences-baskets of red-orange color with a yellow center.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Karma Bon Bini’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Mexico and South America
  • Plant Size: 4’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

Karma Bon Bini Dahlias offer a stunning contrast of color, with yellow petals that finish splay out into deep reddish-orange tips. They have four-inch flowers, with many blooms per plant, helping to create a full look in your garden without having to plant excessive amounts of them.

It’s best to keep Karma Bon Bini Dahlias in full sun, although they won’t die if they have a run-in with partial shade. These cactus Dahlias will continue to produce flowers until the first frost of the season.

Kelvin Floodlight

Kelvin Floodlight
Kelvin Floodlight Dahlia is a tall variety that forms huge flower baskets of a yellow, not very saturated shade.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Kelvin Floodlight’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Central and South America, Mexico
  • Plant Size: 36” – 48”
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

The Kelvin Floodlight gets its name because these are species of Dahlias that have 12-inch pure yellow flowers, making them resemble lights in your garden. To further add to their floodlight-like appearance, the flowers grow within dark green foliage, highlighting their bright yellow.

Because of its large flowers that twist and turn to give this plant a delicate appearance, the Kelven Floodlight Dahlia is one of the most prized decorative Dahlias for the American Dahlia Society

Kilburn Rose

Kilburn Rose
Watering should be plentiful 1 or 2 times in 7 days, however, make sure that the soil is not waterlogged, because rot can appear on the root system quite quickly.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Kilburn Rose’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Central and South America, Mexico
  • Plant Size: 4’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

The Kilburn Rose Dahlia produces a deep pink double flower and belongs to the waterlily category. Although the Kilburn only has a single color, numerous veins crisscross over its petals, giving it an attractive texture.

You can begin staking the Kilburn Rose Dahlia starting in June. You can expect to see flowers begin forming within a month, although you should deadhead these plants regularly to maximize bud production.

Lilac Time

Lilac Time
During the growing season, Lilac Time Dahlia needs top dressing 2 times a month, using both mineral and organic fertilizers.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Lilac Time’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: England
  • Plant Size: 3.5’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

There’s nothing like the deep purple color of lilacs, and the Lilac Time Dahlia mimics just that. However, no one will mistake this Dahlia for a true lilac, given that it produces large double petal flowers that sit upright on individual stems.

Unfortunately, for people who love the smell of lilacs, the Lilac Time Dahlia produces little scent. In fact, this is typical of Dahlias, which are mostly fragrance-free.

Magenta Star

Magenta Star
Magenta Star Dahlia produces purple star-shaped flowers with a yellow center.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Magenta Star’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Central and South America, Mexico
  • Plant Size: 5’ – 6’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

The Magenta Star is one of the Dahlia varieties that’s a classic for your garden and flower arrangements. It produces starry flowers with eight single petals that overlap with each other.

What makes the Magenta Star so striking and an award winner is that it has a magenta base with soft white streaks throughout its petals. It’s impossible to miss its center, though, which boasts yellow pollen around a dark center.

Melody Dora

Melody Dora
Melody Dora Dahlia is a bright representative of composite perennials that reproduce by tubers. The flower is very lush, 10-15 cm in diameter, with yellow petals and a red center.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Melody Dora’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Central and South America, Mexico
  • Plant Size: 18” – 24”
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

Melody Doras are an excellent type of Dahlia for fall flower arrangements. They have a soft beach color with hints of purple veins. Their buds are particularly attractive, with a greater concentration of purple color.

The decorative Melody Dora grows well in containers and gardens alike, given that they’re relatively short for a Dahlia plant. You should aim to plant it in the spring once the soil reaches 60 degrees Fahrenheit.

Moonfire

Moonfire
To get larger and more spectacular flowers, it is recommended to resort to pruning.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Moonfire’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: The Netherlands
  • Plant Size: 24” – 36”
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

If you’re looking for a single flower Dahlia that will complement—but not overpower—the other plants in your garden, the Moonfire is an excellent choice. It contains light orange petals with a deep orange splash around its yellow and brown flower center.

The flowers only grow three inches wide, and they’re relatively sparse, sitting atop tall stems. So, they’re great for mixing with other flower varieties. You can also use them as cut flowers, as they maintain a long vase life.

Moor Place

Moor Place
Throughout the season, in tall varieties, it is recommended to cut off the growing side shoots, which can be used as cuttings.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Moor Place’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Central and South America, Mexico
  • Plant Size: 30” – 36”
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

Moor Place Dahlias produce such a dark purple flower that almost looks black from afar. As a result, they’re an excellent choice for mixing with other lighter-colored ball Dahlia varieties.

Since Moor Place Dahlias have long stems, they’re wonderful for putting in vases or as a bouquet. These plants start to flower as early as 80 days from planting, and it’s best to choose firm flower heads if you plan on cutting them, as they’ll have a longer life.

Mystic Illusion

Mystic Illusion
Mystic Illusion Dahlia looks great in flower beds, and along borders and other fences, and can also be grown in containers or flower pots.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Mystic Illusion’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Central and South America, Mexico
  • Plant Size: 18” – 36”
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

Mystic Illusion Dahlias excel at adding color to gardens, as they have bright yellow petals with cute button brown centers. These Dahlias perform beautifully as potted plants, given their short size and ability to produce many compact flowers.

You should ensure your Mystic Illusion Dahlias get a minimum of four hours of sun each day, although they prefer six hours. These plants hold up well in the heat and attract a variety of butterflies.

Newaukum Honey

Newaukum Honey
Newaukum Honey Dahlia has soft peach flowers with yellow accents closer to the base of the petal.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Newaukum Honey’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: United States
  • Plant Size: 4’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

The informal decorative Newaukum Honey Dahlia produces showy five-inch blooms with petals that cascade down like a waterfall. They come in a peach color, with yellow accents closer to the petal base. They also have a deep peachy orange color in their center.

Newaukum Honey Dahlias didn’t make their way into the world until 2008, but they’ve quickly become a gardener’s favorite. You’ll need to ensure you plant this Dahlia in soil with a pH between 6.1 – 7.5.

Night Butterfly

Night Butterfly
Night Butterfly Dahlia – flowers are dark red with white frills.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Night Butterfly’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Mexico, Central, and South America
  • Plant Size: 2’ – 3’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

Get ready to watch guests do a double-take as they arrive at your house, passing your Night Butterfly Dahlia plants. These Dahlias put on a colorful show. They have a deep maroon base with smaller white and pink-accented petals that protrude around a deep yellow center.

The Night Butterfly Dahlia grows flowers as little as two inches in diameter. However, they have sturdy stems and petals, meaning that a summer thunderstorm won’t damage them.

Peaches n’ Cream

Peaches n’ Cream
Peaches n’ Cream Dahlias are tall flowers that feature superb buds of delicate peach hue with red, yellow, cream and pink strokes all over.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Peaches n’ Cream’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Mexican central plateau and highlands
  • Plant Size: 46” – 54”
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

If you’re picturing pink and orange flowers after reading the name Peaches n’ Cream, you’re spot-on. However, the color of this particular Dahlia variety varies more than you might expect, as it can range from more of an orange hue to light pink.

You should plant Peaches n’ Cream Dahlias in well-draining soil and take care to ensure they don’t dry out. They’re a popular plant among garden-friendly insects, and they make a great low-lying border.

Pianella

Pianella
To promote Pianella Dahlia growth, keep them away from windy places.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Pianella’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: United States
  • Plant Size: 18” – 24”
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

Pianellas belong to the cactus Dahlia variety, and they come in many colors. These plants have petals that would typically be wide. However, they curl downwards, creating lots of space between the petals and making them resemble a cactus.

As with other Dahlia cactus varieties, the Pianella feels soft to the touch. It’s ideal as a statement plant, so choose where you plant it wisely. Keeping it away from windy spaces is best to promote flower growth and health.

Pink Giraffe

Pink Giraffe
Pink Giraffe Dahlia has wonderful flowers with pink and white stripes.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Pink Giraffe’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Central and South America, Mexico
  • Plant Size: 1’ – 2’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

Picture a giraffe with its dark and light brown stripes. Now, imagine those stripes have altering colors of pink and white or purple and white. That’s what the Pink Giraffe Dahlia looks like.

The alternating colors of the Pink Giraffe’s narrow, upward turned petals make it an award-winning plant in many competitions. Because it’s a lower-growing Dahlia variety, plant it in an area where other plants won’t block its flowers, which bloom from July until the first frost.

Plum Suprise

Plum Suprise
Plum Suprise Dahlia has petals of dark red tubular shape, forming a ball.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Plum Surprise’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Central and South America, Mexico
  • Plant Size: 3’ – 4’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

Plum Surprise is another variety of pompom Dahlias. Despite its name, Plum Suprise boasts petals with more of a deep red color rather than the purplish-black color of most plums. Nevertheless, this is a showy plant that most passersby will appreciate, given that each petal forms a tube-like shape, collectively forming a ball.

We encourage you to plant your Plum Surprise Dahlias in a sunny place and ensure it receives occasional fertilizer. Removing dead flowerheads is also crucial for blooming success.

Purpinka

Purpinka
Purpinka Dahlia has deep purple flowers that attract many bees and butterflies.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Purpinka’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Mexico
  • Plant Size: 15”
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

With so many Dahlia varieties, it can feel repetitive (albeit true) to call each one unique, but the Purpinka stands out among the varieties of Dahlias for its mass of tubular petals atop a single flat layer of petals.

Purpinka Dahlias are a deep purple color, and they thrive in moist but well-draining soil. You can expect them to attract an array of bees and butterflies. Should you wish to use its flowers in vases, pick the ones that are already in full bloom.  

Purple Flame

Purple Flame
Purple Flame Dahlia blooms from summer to autumn with fiery purple flowers.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Purple Flame’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Central and South America, Mexico
  • Plant Size: 3’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

Although the Purple Flame Dahlia is a pure purple color, it has deeper purples on its underside that offer an attractive contrast with its top petals. Therefore, you’ll get to enjoy a two-toned color while maintaining the purple vibe you’re going for in your garden.

Purple Flame Dahlias start blooming in the mid-summer, and they produce flowers that grow nearly five inches in diameter. Their leaves and stems are a standard green. Purple Flames have a fast growth rate as long as you plant them in well-drained and fertilized soil.

Purple Splash

Purple Splash
Since the dahlia has a hollow stem and strong wind or rain can break it, it is necessary to tie the dahlia to a stake.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Purple Splash’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: United States
  • Plant Size: 36” – 48”
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

Purple Splash Dahlias have a lighter purple flower color with dark parable streaks. They have papery petals that form thick flower heads, but the petals aren’t in a perfect circle, which gives them more character.

These flowers are a favorite among people putting together flower arrangements, as Purple Splash Dahlias have a good vase life. It’s crucial to ensure these Dahlias have plenty of water, for they’ll die in a drought.

Rothsay Reveller

Rothsay Reveller
Rothsay Reveller Dahlia is an excellent flowering plant for borders or hedges.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Rothsay Reveller’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: United Kingdom
  • Plant Size: 4’ – 5’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

Rothsay Reveller Dahlias resemble the Checkers Dahlia, except they have a smoother and longer blend of two-tone colors, making them ideal if you don’t want your garden to look too busy with color patterns.

Because Rothsay Revellers can grow up to five feet high, they make an excellent border or hedgerow flowering plant. However, they also do well in pots, as long as you keep them trimmed. It’ll be easy to do so, given that you’ll need to keep their old flowers cut back to spark new bud growth.

Santa Claus Dinner Plate

Santa Claus Dinner Plate
Santa Claus Dinner Plate Dahlia perfectly tolerates heat and blooms from mid-July until the very frost.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Santa Claus Dinner Plate’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Central and South America, Mexico
  • Plant Size: 3.5’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

You might want to find a nickname for the Santa Claus Dinner Plate Dahlia if you don’t want your kids to think that Santa Claus comes to your garden in the summer. It’s a shame that these plants don’t grow in the winter, though, given that their white and red-streaked flowers look like candy canes fit for Christmas.

The reality is that you’ll get to enjoy these striped flowers from July to October. Expect deer to turn their heads at them, while bees and butterflies will be glad to spend time around them.

Scura

Scura
The best place for dahlias in the garden will be the south side of the house, as well as near groups of taller plants, also from the most illuminated side.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Scura’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Central and South America, Mexico
  • Plant Size: 1’ – 2’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

The Scura Dahlia is an excellent choice if you’re looking for a more delicate flowering plant that mixes well with other flowers. Because of its small stature, botanists classify it as a “dwarf” Dahlia variety. And that goes for its flowers, too, which only grow up to one-inch wide.

Not only will the Scura’s dark orange flower petals offer a pleasant color touch to your garden, but its dark greenish-purple leaves will too. You can expect this single-flowered Dahlia to produce flowers until the first frost.

Seattle

Seattle
Seattle Dahlia produces massive double flowers of bright yellow.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Seattle’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Mexico, Central, and South America
  • Plant Size: 36” – 48”
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

Thanks to its massive double flowers, the Seattle Dahlia family also belongs to the dinner plate Dahlia family. Its name is ironic for notoriously rainy Seattle, as it has bright yellow petals that someone seemingly dipped the tips of in white paint.

In some cases, the Seattle Dahlia’s flower petals might even be wavy. You should ensure this plant doesn’t spend much time in frosty conditions. Otherwise, it’ll kill the tubers, making it impossible for them to grow back the following year.

Stacy Rachelle

Stacy Rachelle
The soil in the area allocated for dahlias should be permeable and differ in looseness of the structure, and fertility.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Stacy Rachelle’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: United States
  • Plant Size: 8”
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

In 1993, the Stacy Rachelle Dahlia became an officially new Dahlia variety. Since then, it’s stolen the show of many gardens for people wanting to incorporate purple colors. The Stacy Rachelle Dahlia’s flowers grow on thick, straight stalks and almost resemble sunflowers in how they perch on top of them.

Nevertheless, because these plants grow less than one-foot high, they’re an excellent option for pots. Just make sure to use a minimum of a 3-gallon pot per plant.

Strawberry Ice

Strawberry Ice
Strawberry Ice Dahlia has a very long flowering period. This species has strong stems that do not break even in strong winds.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Strawberry Ice’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Central and South America, Mexico
  • Plant Size: 48” – 60”
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

It’s easy to see where the Strawberry Ice Dahlia gets the word “ice” in its name, given that its flowers have whitish-yellow accents. That said, this flower’s base color is far closer to pink than red. Depending on the type you choose, you might get a Strawberry Ice Dahlia with an open-centered flower.

To help your Strawberry Ice Dahlias maximize their flower production, cut away dead and dying flowers regularly.

Sunshine

Sunshine
Sunshine Dahlia loves water, they need to be watered daily (especially if the summer is dry), at the end of the summer watering is reduced.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Sunshine’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Central and South America, Mexico
  • Plant Size: 18” – 24”
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

Yes, you really can grow sunshine in your garden. The Sunshine Dahlia boasts deep yellow petals as a base color. But a bright orange color splashes a thick ring around the center of this single-flower plant, making its dark brown center stand out even more.

Sunshine Dahlias produce lots of nectar, meaning you can expect a lot of butterflies to hang around them. Each bloom lasts at least four weeks, and you might even see some hummingbirds around them.

Surprise

Surprise
The acidity of the soil should be slightly positive or neutral.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Surprise’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Central and South America, Mexico
  • Plant Size: 3’ – 4’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

If you want to choose one of the Dahlia varieties that will bring a surprise and smile to those who pass it as it turns from a tight blossom to a showy mass of wavy petals, the Suprise Dahlia is an excellent choice. The light pink to peach-colored petals form an 8 – 10-inch flower that sits atop a thin, dark brown stem.

Since you’re likely familiar with the cactus Dahlia species by now, it probably comes as little “surprise” to you that the Surprise Dahlia belongs to this family once you see its soft but spiny-looking petals.

Taratahi Ruby

Taratahi Ruby
Taratahi Ruby Dahlia produces pale red flowers, 10-12 cm in diameter, which harmonize well with other plants.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Taratahi Ruby’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: New Zealand
  • Plant Size: 4’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

If you’re looking for a ruby red flower to complement your white-sided house, the Taratahi Ruby is an easy choice. Its flowers grow up to five inches in diameter, which is in the middle of the range for Dahlias. However, its long stems ensure that this flower grows above its dark green leaves.

You can expect the Taratahi Ruby flower to grow fast, so map out where you want to plant it since it’s not a good idea to transplant it after it takes root.

Teesbrooke Audrey

Teesbrooke Audrey
Teesbrooke Audrey Dahlia produces white-purple flowers with a yellow center.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Teesbrooke Audrey’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Central and South America, Mexico
  • Plant Size: 35” – 40”
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

The Teesbrooke Audrey Dahlia, which also goes by the name Collarette Dahlia, is a spring-like flower with large, flat petals striped in light pink and white. It then has a second layer of smaller, primarily white flower petals that emerge from its bright yellow center.

If you wish to keep your Teesbrooke Audrey bulbs for the following year at the end of the flower cycle, dig up the tubers. Then, keep them indoors in a dry, dark place with a room temperature of around 60 degrees Fahrenheit.

The Phantom

The Phantom
The formation of tubers in flowers requires a large number of nutrients and sufficient moisture.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘The Phantom’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Mountains of Mexico and Central America
  • Plant Size: 3’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

The Phantom is an anemone-style Dahlia that has dozens of narrow tube flowers. These dark red tubes congregate closely together, and their irregular-shaped edges give them a spongy-looking texture. A ring of eight flat light pink petals frames the bottom of the tubes, which form a ball shape.

Many Phantoms flower on the early end for Dahlias, as you might even see some blossoms in June. You can plant them from March to May in moist but well-draining soil.

Totally Tangerine

Totally Tangerine
In open ground, dahlias can only be planted after the threat of a return of frost has passed and the soil warms up well.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Totally Tangerine’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Central and South America, Mexico
  • Plant Size: 2’ – 3’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

We won’t lie and say that you could mistake Totally Tangerine Dahlias for being actual tangerines, but their orange and pink hues offer somewhat of a resemblance to this fruit. They’re a single-flower plant that produces a breathtaking amount of blooms if you plant them in full sunlight.

Once the Totally Tangerine Dahlia takes root, it’s a quick process for them to get to blooming maturity. At that time, a lot of pollinators will arrive, taking advantage of pollen from the 3 – 4-inch flowers.

Vulcan

Vulcan
Vulcan Dahlia has colorful flowers and a long flowering period, which will continue from the formation of the first buds, usually in late June – early July, and continues until frost.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Vulcan’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Mexican central plateau and highlands
  • Plant Size: 44” – 52”
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

The semi-cactus Dahlia Vulcan variety looks like it has prickly flowers from afar. But upon closer inspection, you’ll see that they’re merely soft petals. There’s another reason why you’d want to get close to the Vulcan, though—the striped Vulcan variety has completely red petals on one half of the flower and yellow and red spotted petals on the other half.

You can also purchase standard Vulcan varieties, which come in solid red and orange colors. Its leaves are attractive with a semi-round shape and glossy texture.

Waltzing Mathilda

Waltzing Mathilda
Waltzing Mathilda Dahlia – its petals have a curved irregular shape intertwined with each other.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Waltzing Mathilda’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Central and South America, Mexico
  • Plant Size: 1’ – 2’
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

We dare you to not get the song “Waltzing Mathilda” in your head as you shop for this Dahlia of that very name. You could even go as far as to say that the petals of the Waltzing Mathilda look like they’re dancing, for they have a curved irregular shape as they intertwine with each other.

The flowers grow up to four inches in diameter and boast an attractive combination of yellow, orange, and coral colors.

Wizard of Oz

Wizard of Oz
Wizard of Oz Dahlia is a heat and sun-loving plant that prefers moist soils without stagnant water.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Wizard of Oz’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Holland
  • Plant Size: 32”
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

Your inner child will delight at the sight of Wizard of Oz Dahlias, with their soft pink color and honeycomb-shaped petals. They’re an excellent choice to plant with other Dahlias in the pompom family, as they, too, boast 2 – 3-inch ball-like flowers.

While Wizard of Oz Dahlias makes excellent bouquets, they grow in a bouquet-like way, with a single flower sitting atop a long stem and the stems congregating closely together.

Yankee Doodle Dandy

Yankee Doodle Dandy
Yankee Doodle Dandy Dahlia is a low-growing, compact and bushy plant with long, dark pink petals streaked with white.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Yankee Doodle Dandy’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Central and South America, Mexico
  • Plant Size: 20” – 24”
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

The Yankee Doodle Dandy Dahlia has an outer ring of long dark pink petals with stripes of white. The flowers then have a white accent, thanks to a smaller inner ring of petals. Both of these petal layers frame a bright yellow open center.

Since Yankee Doodle Dandies are a short, compact, and bush-like plant, they’re an excellent Dahlia for pots. They flower best in full sun with plenty of potash-rich nutrients. It’s best to hold out planting these flowers until late May in most destinations.

Yellow and Red Striped Dinner Plate

Yellow and Red Striped Dinner Plate
Yellow and Red Striped Dinner Plate Dahlia has flowers with unique color patterns matching red and yellow.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Yellow and Red Striped Dinner Plate’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Mexican central plateau and highlands
  • Plant Size: 36” – 48”
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

We’ve come to yet another fun dinner plate Dhalia variety. The Yellow and Red Striped dinner plate comes in an array of unique color patterns, depending on the type you buy. Some flowers have a yellow base with streaks of red, whereas others are the reverse. In contrast, you can buy these Dahlias with a fairly equal combination of red and yellow speckles.

The Yellow and Red Striped Dinner Plate Dahlias grow on individual stems from bushy plants. They have dark green leaves and stems, allowing their flowers to be the star of the show.

Yellow and White

Yellow and White
Yellow and White Dahlia produces gorgeous yellow flowers with white tips.
Scientific Name: Dahlia ‘Yellow and White’
  • Plant Type: Perennial
  • Geographic Origin: Central and South America, Mexico
  • Plant Size: 36” – 48”
  • Sun Exposure: Full sun
  • Plant Zone: 6 – 11

Rounding off our top Dahlia favorites is the Yellow and White Dahlia, which comes in two dominating colors. The first type has primarily yellow petals and white tips. Alternatively, you can purchase primarily white petals with yellow close to the center rather than the tips.

The dinner-plate-sized Yellow and White Dahlia prefers lots of sunlight and access to high-quality fertilizer. You should offer them a moderate amount of water and ensure that their soil drains well to avoid root rot.

Final Thoughts

Whether you’d like a short Dahlia plant to compliment your flower garden or a taller type to serve as a colorful hedgerow, there’s a near-endless number of Dahlia varieties.

As long as you plant your Dahlias in conditions that are suitable for their needs, you can expect them to thrive. So, we encourage you to visit your local nursery and get to work planting the Dahlias that stood out to you in this article.

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