Camellia Varieties: 23 Different Types of Camellia You’ll Love

Looking to add some camellias to your garden this season, but aren't sure which to choose? There are many different types of camellias, so picking just one can be a bit difficult! In this article, gardening expert Melissa Strauss walks through her favorite camellia varieties, with names and pictures of each!

camellia varieties

If you’re looking for a hardy, low maintenance flowering shrub that blooms during the cooler months, the camellia is a magical plant with wide reaching appeal. Hailing originally from the continent of Asia, camellias now play a starring role in many gardens in the Southern United States, and throughout zones 7-10, with a few varieties that can be grown as far North as zone 6 (we will talk about 3 of these beauties).

While they are native mainly to China, Japan and Korea, throughout the 1900’s researchers from all over the world have bred some of the most dazzling hybrid varieties, to achieve new color and petal formation combinations, as well as breeding selectively for cold hardiness. From Australia, New Zealand and the USA, all the way to a splashy variety bred in Italy, these specimens are some of the most beautiful and versatile flowering plants you will find.

Boasting more than 250 known species and upwards to 3,000 hybrid varieties, it’s incredibly difficult to pick just one variety of camellia So, we’ve put together a comprehensive list of our favorites, with each camellia chosen for its unique appearance and growth habits. You’ll find the camellias on this list are comprised of a wide berth of colors, petal formations and plant zone versatility. Ready to learn more? Let’s dig in!

‘April Blush’

C. japonica ‘April Blush’
April Blush prefers to grow in partial shade, and blooms profusely throughout the season.
Scientific Name: C. japonica ‘April Blush’
  • Plant Type: Evergreen
  • Geographical Origin: China
  • Plant Size: 4’-10’ tall and 3’-7’ wide
  • Sun Exposure: Partial shade, filtered light
  • Plant Zone:  6-9

April Blush is another evergreen shrub variety that will survive colder temperatures. It is slow growing, topping out between 4-10 feet, and likes partial shade, as well as protection from wind in colder climates. April makes a lovely hedge and blooms freely during the season.

April Blush blooms from Winter through Spring. Its flowers are large and ethereal, a pale blush pink set against dark green leaves. The sizeable blooms are semi double petal form and open fully to reveal graceful, golden stamens.

‘Australis’

C. japonica ‘Australis’
Australis produces beautiful bright red peony-shaped flowers.
Scientific Name: C. japonica ‘Australis’
  • Plant Type: Evergreen
  • Geographical Origin: Australia
  • Plant Size: 6’-12’ (potentially up to 25’) tall and 6’-10’ wide
  • Sun Exposure: Partial sun to full shade
  • Plant Zone: 7-9

A popular red variety and a winner of the Award of Garden Merit from the Horticultural Society, this is a stunning plant. Australis is a late bloomer, but when she blooms it’s a sight to behold.

Growing up to 12’ tall and with a spread of up to 10’, this variety covers itself in large (5”) bright, rose red, peony form blossoms. Bright yellow stamens peek out from among the ruffled and irregular center petals creating a warm, lit from within glow. A wonderful specimen!

‘Ballet in Pink’

Ballet in Pink Variety
Ballet in Pink produces delightful orchid-pink flowers with peony petals.
Scientific Name: Camellia x williamsii ‘Ballet in Pink’
  • Plant Type: Evergreen
  • Geographical Origin:  North Carolina, USA
  • Plant Size: 8’-10’ tall and 4’-6’ wide
  • Sun Exposure: Morning sun, afternoon shade
  • Plant Zone: 7-9

This particular variety is an all-around dazzling bloomer. Right around the time that the famous ballet, The Nutcracker Suite is being performed by companies around the world, Ballet in Pink explodes with a profusion of flowers that may outdo the rest of the varieties on this, and quite possibly, any list. Ballet will top out around 10’ tall and loves a partially shaded spot in the garden.

The blooms on this variety are large (4’-5’) and bountiful, appearing on every node of a healthy plant. This camellia blooms in bright pink with peony petal formation, yellow stamens are sprinkled in among the ruffled inner petals. 

The buds form in clusters, and if you want to encourage larger flowers, plucking all but one bud per cluster will achieve this purpose. Don’t worry about thinning out too many buds, the blooms on this camellia are plentiful and beautiful. This camellia is a true performer.

‘Black Lace’

C. reticulata X williamsii ‘Black Lace’
Black Lace produces bright, velvety red flowers that bloom from mid-winter.
Scientific Name: C. reticulata X williamsii ‘Black Lace’
  • Plant Type: Evergreen
  • Geographical Origin: Mississippi, USA
  • Plant Size: 6’-10’ tall and 7’ wide
  • Sun Exposure: Dappled shade, tolerates more sun when mature
  • Plant Zone: 7-9

This variety of c. Japonica sounds a bit different than it appears. Not black at all, this camellia sports brilliant, velvety red blooms from mid-Winter through Spring. These prolific blooms take on a formal double petal form, making them look like a brilliant, fully opened red rose.

Black Lace is slow growing, taking up to 10 years to reach a mature height of about 6’, though it can reach upwards to 10’ over time. It is hardy and blooms profusely if it is planted in a spot with slightly acidic, well-drained soil and filtered sunlight.

‘Black Magic’

Black Magic
This magnificent variety of camellia will enchant everyone with its magical dark red flowers with black veins.
Scientific Name: C. japonica ‘Black Magic’
  • Plant Type: Evergreen
  • Geographical Origin: California, USA
  • Plant Size: 10’-12’ tall and 8’-10’ wide
  • Sun Exposure: Filtered sun to shade
  • Plant Zone: 7-9

I simply can’t imagine a list of recommended camellias that doesn’t include Black Magic. This glorious variety is certain to cast its spell over every passerby with its stunning flower show, which takes place in Winter, and continues into the early Spring months.

Black Magic’s foliage resembles that of a holly bush, dark, serrated leaves are unusual and create a perfect backdrop for the real star of the show, its enchanted blooms. Black magic has truly magical flowers.

The petals are deep crimson and veined with black. These blooms have a ruffled, double petal formation, and some say they look quite a bit like high end artificial flowers as the petals themselves have a glossy appearance in addition to their otherworldly color.  In case you couldn’t tell, I am a big fan of Black Magic.

Image Credit: Megan Hansen via Flickr (Image use allowed with attribution)

‘Bonnie Marie’

C. japonica x williamsii ‘Bonnie Marie’
Bonnie Marie blooms with delightful bright pink flowers from November to April.
Scientific Name: C. japonica x williamsii ‘Bonnie Marie’
  • Plant Type: Evergreen
  • Geographical Origin: Georgia, USA
  • Plant Size: 8’-10’ tall and 6’-8’ wide
  • Sun Exposure: Sun to partial shade
  • Plant Zone: 7-9

Bonnie is a wonderful addition to the garden with its extra-long blooming season. Bonnie Marie will bloom from November until April with her delightful flowers that will shine extra bright in partial shade.

Reaching about 10’ in height, this camellia fits beautifully with a Japanese magnolia canopy and an azalea foundation, together these three would keep you flush with pink blossoms from Mid-Fall through late Spring!

Bonnie’s blooms come in anemone petal form. It’s very large blooms (5”) are a delicate pink, with darker veining, and the ruffled center petals are sprinkled with dark yellow stamens. Fully opened it has the appearance of a perfect pink garden rose, without the thorns. This variety makes wonderful cut flowers.

‘Brushfield’s Yellow’

Brushfield’s Yellow
This is one of the most impressive yellow camellias that produces creamy white flowers with bright yellow stamens inside.
Scientific Name: C. japonica ‘Brushfield’s Yellow’
  • Plant Type: Evergreen
  • Geographical Origin: Australia
  • Plant Size: 10’-16’ tall and 6’-10’ wide
  • Sun Exposure: Morning sun, filtered sun
  • Plant Zone: 7-9

There are only a handful of camellias with yellow flowers, and Brushfield’s just may be the most spectacular. This camellia plant will top out around 15’ at maturity, and likes to live predominantly in the shade, although they will tolerate a few hours of the morning sun.

Brushfield’s Yellow has dark green, glossy foliage which beautifully compliments its signature blooms. Its blooms are a creamy white outside in a single petal form, surrounding a peony-like cluster of buttery yellow inner petals. Bright yellow stamens are centrally visible up close, and from afar create a radiating ombre effect.

‘Debutante’

C. japonica ‘Debutante’
Debutante produces incredibly dreamy flowers in ballet pink.
Scientific Name: C. japonica ‘Debutante’
  • Plant Type: Evergreen
  • Geographical Origin: Georgia, USA
  • Plant Size: 6’-8’ tall and wide
  • Sun Exposure: Full shade to filtered sun
  • Plant Zone: 7-9

Possibly one of the most well-known and loved variety of Camellia is the aptly named Debutante. The Debutante bloom is truly dreamy flower, a full peony petal formation in ballet pink makes this a perfect corsage flower.

These fluffy pink confections resemble a rose or peony and begin blooming early in the season, in Fall. They make excellent cut flowers with their generous number of large, pale pink, ruffled blooms. Debutante is a member of the c. Japonica variety. It is on the smaller end of the scale for this variety, coming in at just around 8’ when mature.

Desire’

C. japonica ‘Desire’
This is a fast-growing camellia with flowers that have a gradient effect from dark to pale pink and white.
Scientific Name: C. japonica ‘Desire’
  • Plant Type: Evergreen
  • Geographical Origin: Japan
  • Plant Size: 6’-12’ (potentially up to 25’) tall and 6’-10’ wide
  • Sun Exposure: Morning sun, afternoon shade
  • Plant Zone: 7-10

The name says it all, once I laid eyes upon the mesmerizing blooms of this camellia, I had the instantaneous desire to have one for myself! The plant itself is a faster growing camellia and reaches about 10’ tall at maturity.

It appreciates partial to full shade and in the off season is a particularly handsome landscape element with its deep green dense foliage. But it is those blooms that are something to dream about.

The first outer petals are a deep rose shade, which is lovely on its own. They open to reveal an ombre effect gradient from dark, to pale pink to pure white at the center of their formal double petals. To top it off, these blooms are 4” in diameter! Breathtaking!

‘E.G. Waterhouse’

Camellia x williamsii ‘E.G. Waterhouse’
This pink variety of camellia blooms in early winter with perfectly formed, double, pink flowers.
Scientific Name: Camellia x williamsii ‘E.G. Waterhouse’
  • Plant Type: Evergreen
  • Geographical Origin: Australia
  • Plant Size: 9’-12’ tall and 6’-9’ wide
  • Sun Exposure: Partial shade, out of afternoon sun
  • Plant Zone: 7-9

Named for Eben Gowrie Waterhouse, an Australian Germanic scholar turned plant breeder in retirement, this is a pink variety that deserves recognition. Waterhouse is another long bloomer, with flowers showing up in early Winter and lasting through the late Spring months. It is a fair-sized plant, reaching upwards to 12’ and works nicely as a tree or espalier.

The blooms on Waterhouse are about the most perfect things you will ever lay eyes on. Perfectly formed, formal double, medium pink blooms open fully to reveal a small cluster of barely visible stamens, just a suggestion of them really. Blooms are medium in size and their long stems make them perfect for cutting.

‘Irrational Exuberance’

C. japonica ‘Irrational Exuberance’
Irrational Exuberance produces pink double flowers with bright white margins and deep red veins.
Scientific Name: C. japonica ‘Irrational Exuberance’
  • Plant Type: Evergreen
  • Geographical Origin: Alabama, USA
  • Plant Size: 4’-5’ tall and 5’-6’ wide
  • Sun Exposure: Morning sun, afternoon shade
  • Plant Zone: 7-9

The only one on the list that has varying petal formations, Irrational Exuberance is surprising and delightful. Its medium to large blooms appear in formal double, double rose, and peony petal forms.

The blossoms are variegated, with bold white edges, and deep red veining bursts out from the center. A smattering of yellow stamens mingle with the red of the inner petals.

Exuberance is a slow grower that spreads, so it needs some surrounding space, or it may encroach on other nearby plants. Topping out at 4’-5’, it can grow wider than it does tall by 1’-2’. This variety was hybridized in Fairhope, Alabama, and blooms mainly in the Spring.

‘Jean May’

C. sasanqua ‘Jean May’
This early flowering variety has delightful delicate, pale pink flowers with light yellow stamens.
Scientific Name: C. sasanqua ‘Jean May’
  • Plant Type: Evergreen
  • Geographical Origin: Florida, USA
  • Plant Size: 10’ tall and 6’ wide
  • Sun Exposure: Partial shade to part sun
  • Plant Zone: 7-9

Jean May is a popular, early blooming variety of sasanqua, that needs partial shade in the early years, but can survive in full sun once it matures. Compact and reaching 6’-10’ tall, it makes a lovely privacy hedge or espalier.

Jean’s flowers are delicate and breathtaking. It blooms abundantly in shell pink that is pale and nearly translucent at the outer edges and darkens to a lovely coral shade in the center, where a few irregular petals mingle with light yellow stamens to give the appearance of being lit from within. This award-winning camellia is graceful in form and has a pleasing fragrance as well.

‘Lavinia Maggi’

C. japonica ‘Lavinia Maggi’
Lavinia Maggi produces very large flowers of a unique coloring, white with fuchsia patches.
Scientific Name: C. japonica ‘Lavinia Maggi’
  • Plant Type: Evergreen
  • Geographical Origin: Italy
  • Plant Size: 6’-12’ tall and 6’-10’ wide
  • Sun Exposure: Partial shade to part sun
  • Plant Zone: 7-10

Lavinia is a dazzling star of the garden. Its extra-large (5’) blooms show off in profusion from mid to late season making this a focal point in any surroundings. The flowers are uniquely colored, white with fuchsia splashes painting the inner part of formal double petals.

This is another shade loving shrub, and it grows to about 10’ tall with an 8” spread. Lavinia Maggi is another winner of the Royal Horticultural Society’s Award of Garden Merit. The only species on the list that was cultivated in Europe, this Mediterranean variety is a specimen to be proud of.

‘Les Jury’

Camellia x williamsii ‘Les Jury’
This camellia cultivar has won the Royal Horticultural Society’s Award of Garden Merit for its incredible deep crimson flowers.
Scientific Name: Camellia x williamsii ‘Les Jury’
  • Plant Type: Evergreen
  • Geographical Origin: New Zealand
  • Plant Size: 10’ tall and 6’ wide
  • Sun Exposure: Partial to full shade
  • Plant Zone: 7-10

Les Jury is another winner of the prestigious Award of Garden Merit of the Royal Horticultural Society. It prefers shade and when kept out of direct sun it will produce legions of blooms, many in clusters.

This camellia is one the smaller side so it’s very versatile, and blooms from January to April in the Northern Hemisphere.

The blooms produced by Les Jury are a deep crimson set against delicate foliage that appears red in its new growth, so this is a camellia that puts on a show year-round. The blooms are large (4’) and formal double petal formation, another camellia that resembles a rose, this is a gorgeous specimen.

‘Margaret Davis’

 C. japonica ‘Margaret Davis’
This unusual flower resembles a carnation, has a dense formation of creamy white and bright pink petals.
Scientific Name: C. japonica ‘Margaret Davis’
  • Plant Type: Evergreen
  • Geographical Origin: Australia
  • Plant Size: 16’ tall and 13’ wide
  • Sun Exposure: Filtered sun, morning sun
  • Plant Zone: 7-9

Ms. Davis is a Camellia Hall of Fame winner named for the founder of The Garden Club of Australia. Known as the rose of winter, Camellias are thought to resemble this most popular flower, but a glance at Margaret Davis may remind you of another popular cut flower, the sweet carnation.

The Margaret Davis is a unique bloom that begins with a creamy white center ruffled around a sprinkling of yellow stamens. The edges of the petals, however, are splashed with bright pink and rose red.

These beauties have a full peony petal formation, making them dense and sturdy, so they make good cut flowers and look stunning afloat in a crystal bowl on your dining room table.

‘Professor Charles S. Sargent’

C. japonica ‘Professor Charles S. Sargent’
This is another incredibly beautiful variety of red camellia with densely ruffled petals.
Scientific Name: C. japonica ‘Professor Charles S. Sargent’
  • Plant Type: Evergreen
  • Geographical Origin: Massachusetts
  • Plant Size: 15’ tall and 10’ wide
  • Sun Exposure: morning sun, afternoon part shade
  • Plant Zone: 7-9

Professor Sargent is as distinguished as it sounds, with a truly unique petal formation. Named for the one-time director of the Arnold Arboretum of Harvard University, the Professor is a beautiful red camellia variety with a unique tight peony petal formation. These densely ruffled petals range in color from rose pink to a deep red color. One flower boasts up to 230 petals!

Its many layers of dense crimson petals make this a particular standout on any list of camellia varieties. Professor has a moderate growth rate and averages 15’ tall and 10’ wide at maturity, although it can grow larger over time, the growth will slow around this size.

‘Ruby Wedding’

C. japonica x williamsii ‘Ruby Wedding’
Ruby Wedding blooms with bright red double-petaled flowers.
Scientific Name: C. japonica x williamsii ‘Ruby Wedding’
  • Plant Type: Evergreen
  • Geographical Origin: New Zealand
  • Plant Size: 5’-6’ tall and 4’-5’ wide
  • Sun Exposure: Partial to full shade
  • Plant Zone: 7-10

Ruby Wedding is a smaller Camellia, reaching about 5-6’ tall by maturation, which is generally about 10 years. It has a nice long blooming window, which can start as early as November and last all the way through April.

Ruby’s name comes from the bright red, Peony to Anemone, double petal blooms it produces. You will want to gaze at these beauties daily, and thanks to its compact size Ruby Wedding is quite versatile in the garden.

‘Setsugekka’

C. sasanqua ‘Setsugekka'
Setsugekka produces white ruffled flowers with bright golden stamens.
Scientific Name: C. sasanqua ‘Setsugekka’
  • Plant Type: Evergreen
  • Geographical Origin: Japan
  • Plant Size: 8’-10’ tall and wide
  • Sun Exposure: Partial shade to part sun
  • Plant Zone: 7-10

Setsugekka has a unique growth habit in the camellia world in that is has a slight weeping tendency, making it a wonderful candidate for espalier. White, ruffled double petals open to reveal fully visible, bright golden stamens.

The flowers of this variety are smaller and less showy than some others on this list, but they have the additional distinction of omitting a pleasing fragrance. It is a low maintenance and vigorous variety and is on the tall end for the sasanqua varieties.

The petals are delicate and fall easily, so these blooms are better left intact, and do not make good cut flowers. The bright side of this is that they do not require deadheading.

‘Shi Shi Gashira’

C. sasanqua ‘Shishigashira’
Shi Shi Gashira blooms with large bright pink flowers with golden stamens.
Scientific Name: C. sasanqua ‘Shishigashira’
  • Plant Type: Evergreen
  • Geographical Origin: Japan
  • Plant Size: 4’-5’ tall and 6’-8’ wide
  • Sun Exposure: filtered sun to part sun
  • Plant Zone: 7-10

Shi Shi Gashira is a variety that produces excellent cut flowers! Long branches with clusters of large, hot pink blooms are impressive to behold outdoors and in. These flowers have semi-double petal formation, The center is ruffled with complimentary clusters of well-defined, golden stamens peeking through the pink petals.

Shi Shi is an early bloomer, so blooms begin in the Fall. It is a smaller camellia, topping out around 5’, and has lots of large, lovely flowers during the blooming season. This is a low-maintenance variety that enjoys the partial shade.

‘Silver Anniversary’

C. japonica ‘Silver Anniversary’
Silver Anniversary has elegant white, semi-double flowers and dark green glossy foliage.
Scientific Name: C. japonica ‘Silver Anniversary’
  • Plant Type: Evergreen
  • Geographical Origin: California
  • Plant Size: 4’-5’ tall and wide
  • Sun Exposure: Partial shade to dappled sunlight
  • Plant Zone: 7-9

This variety of c. Japonica is a beacon of understated elegance. Its graceful, white, semi-double petal blooms begin to appear after the New Year and last through early Spring. It is a winner of the Royal Horticultural Society’s Award of Garden Merit, and it is not difficult to see why.

This shrub’s delicate white flowers practically glow against a background of deep green, glossy leaves. This variety makes a lovely privacy hedge. It likes dappled sunlight, particularly in its early years, but will tolerate a bit more sun once mature.

‘Snow Flurry’

Camellia x olifera ‘Snow Flurry’
This variety is incredibly cold hardy and produces snow-white flowers.
Scientific Name: Camellia x olifera ‘Snow Flurry’
  • Plant Type: Evergreen
  • Geographical Origin: Maryland, USA
  • Plant Size: 5’-7’ tall and 3’-5’ wide
  • Sun Exposure: Part Shade
  • Plant Zone: 6-9

This variety gets its name from its unique tolerance to cold weather. Snow Flurry is one of very few camellias that will grow well as far North as zone 6. This variety also sheds its own spent petals, making the gardeners job easier, because there is no need to deadhead this plant.

Technically considered to be of the peony petal formation, Snow Flurry’s blooms consist of 12 outer petals in a snow-white color. In the center, there is a cluster of yellow to white petaloids mixed in with visible yellow stamens. It has leathery, dark green foliage that complement its soft white blooms.

‘Winter’s Star’

Camellia oleifera ‘Winter’s Star’
Winter’s Star produces pale purple-pink flowers with bright green foliage.
Scientific Name: Camellia oleifera ‘Winter’s Star’
  • Plant Type: Evergreen
  • Geographical Origin: Washington, DC, USA
  • Plant Size: 4’-6’ tall and 5’-7’ wide
  • Sun Exposure: Partial shade, filtered sun
  • Plant Zone: 6-9

Pollinators love this pale violet pink bloom with its single petal formation and dense, showy pile of pollen rich stamens. The fair blooms stand out nicely against glossy, bright green foliage. The leaves are lightly serrated and large.

Winter’s Star only blooms for 4-6 weeks, but the flowers are a sight to behold, and they are very low maintenance as they drop their own petals eliminating the need for deadheading.

‘Yuletide’

C. sasanqua ‘Yuletide’
These rich red flowers with golden stamens begin to bloom towards the end of autumn.
Scientific Name: C. sasanqua ‘Yuletide’
  • Plant Type: Evergreen
  • Geographical Origin: China and Japan
  • Plant Size: 8’-10’ tall and 6’-9’ wide
  • Sun Exposure: Partial shade to part sun
  • Plant Zone: 7-10

The name is evocative of the rich reds, greens and gold tones of Christmastime, and the flower does not disappoint. Yuletide is a plant of the variety c. Sasanqua. The sasanqua is somewhat shorter and shrubbier than its popular cousin c.

Japonica and has a hardy rootstock making them a great foundation for grafting other species. They are also more tolerant of sunlight and can handle quite a few hours of direct sunlight during the day.

Yuletide begins to bloom near the end of Fall, leading directly into the Winter holiday season, and it certainly looks the part. This camellia boasts large, bright red, single petal formation blooms with thick clusters of golden yellow stamens. All of these beautiful blooms are set against a lush foundation of glossy, bright green leaves.

Final Thoughts

There are a seemingly endless number of varieties of camellia. Whether you are looking for a tree to take center stage in your winter landscape, a beautiful blooming privacy hedge, or gorgeous cut flowers to enjoy inside your home, camellias are a wonderful addition to any garden.

With relatively little maintenance and proper planting conditions, a camellia will last a lifetime and provide hundreds of thousands of blooms to your landscape. It would be hard to choose just one favorite, but hopefully this list has provided a good jumping off point for discovering the many beautiful cultivars available!

SHARE THIS POST
rhododendron bloloming tips

Shrubs

14 Tips For Beautiful Blooming Rhododendrons This Season

If you are trying to keep your rhododendrons blooming as long as possible, you are in the right place! Rhodies are beautiful blooming shrubs, but there are some actions you can take to keep them blooming even longer. In this article, gardening expert Jill Drago gives you her top tops to ensure your Rhodies are blooming all season long!

grow azaleas

Shrubs

How to Plant, Grow, and Care For Azaleas

Thinking of adding some Azaleas to your garden this season but aren't quite sure where to start? Azaleas are one of the most popular shrubs you can grow, behind Hydrangeas and Rhododendrons (which Azaleas are just a variety of). In this article, gardening expert and flowering shrub enthusiast Jill Drago teaches you how to plant, grow, and care for Azaleas in your garden!

lilac varieties

Shrubs

Lilac Varieties: 25 Different Types of Lilac Cultivars

Trying to decide what lilac variety to plant this season, but can't pick without a little help? Lilacs have over 25 species, with thousands of cultivars, so it can be hard to settle in and pick the perfect shrub. In this article, certified master gardener Liz Jarosz shares her favorite lilac cultivars you can plant in your garden this season.

hibiscus varieties

Shrubs

41 Different Types of Hibiscus Varieties For Your Garden

Planting hibiscus in your garden can be a challenge if you don't know what type of hibiscus to plant! There are many different varieties, with different colored flowers that can grow across many different hardiness zones. In this article, we examine our favorite types of hibiscus varieties for your home or garden space!

Perennial Shrub in Garden

Shrubs

61 Perennial Shrubs For Your Home and Garden

Thinking of planting some perennial shrubs but aren't sure which ones will best fit your home or garden space? There are many different options for perennial shrubs, so picking the right one can be a bit confusing. In the following article, we examine over 60 of our favorites, to help you find the perfect match for your garden this season.

Red Flowering Shrub Bush

Shrubs

Red Flowering Shrubs: 21 Red Flower Bushes For Your Garden

Thinking of adding some red flowering shrubs to your home garden? There are many different bushes with red flowers to consider when thinking about adding them to your garden space. In this article, we take a deeper look at our favorites, with names and pictures of each!